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Windows News
Microsoft adds H.264 video support to Chrome

Google recently announced that its Chrome web browser will stop supporting the H.264 video format. At Microsoft we respect that Windows customers want the best experience of the web including the ability to enjoy the widest range of content available on the Internet in H.264 format.

Today, as part of the interoperability bridges work we do on this team, we are making available the Windows Media Player HTML5 Extension for Chrome, which is an extension for Google Chrome to enable Windows 7 customers who use Chrome to continue to play H.264 video.

We believe that Windows customers should be able to play mainstream HTML5 video and, as we’ve described in previous posts, Internet Explorer 9 will support playback of H.264 video as well as VP8 video when the user has installed a VP8 codec.

We are committed to ensuring that Windows customers have the best Web experience, and we have been offering for several years now the extremely popular Windows Media Player plug-in for Firefox, which is downloaded by millions of people a month who want to watch Windows Media content.

We also recently provided an add-on for Windows 7 customers who choose Firefox to play H.264 video so as to enable interoperability across IE, Firefox and Chrome using HTML5 video on Windows.

For many reasons - which you can read about on other blog posts here and here - H.264 is an excellent and widely-used video format that serves the web very well today. As such, we will continue to ensure that developers and customers continue to have an optimal Web experience.

The software can be downloaded from Microsoft's website.

Source: MSDN Blogs


1 Comments

Photo
CoffeeFiend
Feb 04 2011 03:09 AM
Thanks to Microsoft for making sure H.264 works in IE, Chrome and Firefox (it already works on Safari and mobile devices with video acceleration). For the ~1% others, there's always H.264-played-by-Flash.

Finally, the one good quality, standard format works everywhere, and with video acceleration most of the time :thumbup