dencorso

Supervisor
  • Content count

    7,417
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    46

dencorso last won the day on February 25

dencorso had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

454 Excellent

1 Follower

About dencorso

  • Rank
    Iuvat plus qui nihil obstat
  • Birthday

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://

Profile Information

  • OS
    XP Pro x86
  • Country

Recent Profile Visitors

5,649 profile views
  1. Wow! Thanks! It also runs OK on my machine. And I can see it does somewhat more than required, as it searches all disks, not just one. But, for sure, I'll have to study it some more to understand it enough to be able to propose any changes... Those WMI commands are fully above my head.
  2. BACKGROUND: My client was hit by a crypto ransomware. The machine has Windows 8.1. However, his disk was partitioned and all datafiles were in disk D:, which is FAT-32. I have created a copy of the D: disk, from which I have already recovered some files still intact, so I have reason to believe the ransomware was not able to encrypt the whole contents of that disk. The folder I recovered contained assorted .jpg .gif .doc .docx and .pdf files, all of them intact, and all those types of files are usually targeted by that malware. However, some other files did get encrypted. I verified that when .pdfs are encrypted they keep the name but the %PDF signature at their 1st four bytes disappears. I intend to do a fast evaluation of how far did the encryptation go, so I thought of transversing the D: tree looking for .pdfs inside each folder, and when found check their 4 1st bytes and output the fully qualified file name to a text log, folowed by "OK" or "BAD". However, to do such a task with a .cmd requires much more ability at batch writing than I do command. Would you please help me, at least, get started? Thanks a lot in advance.
  3. Not really. In case it needs more than about 3.3 GiB 64-bit adressing would be required. But no game able to run on 98SE ever needed even half that much, ever, really.
  4. On the Add-ons Manager, click on the gear icon on top, then on "Check for Updates", and it should start downloading.
  5. Because IE 11 is not supported in 8... I see it on 7 every time I start IE 10, after a fresh reboot...
  6. If they run 10 x32, they ought to run 7 x32 even better. You sure they don't?
  7. Wow! Thanks! I'll test it as soon as I get home! You rock!
  8. Ditto! I'd like to import .cer or .crt files from a for loop command line. Please advise.
  9. Well, I can offer you some further clarifications: links to official MS servers are OK, links to the Internet Archive image of official MS servers and to Digital River (which actually is MS, too) are also OK, when existing, but anything else is "unauthorized redistribution", and hence, against our Rule #1. Please notice that the reason that rule exists is not so much to protect MS's interests, or to hamper our members' freedom, but to actually protect MSFN from trouble. Thank you for your understanding!
  10. That's indeed great news!
  11. Well, if we could identify it, we could lower its priority ourselves... I'll sure give it a shot once I get home... I have 4 machines still to update, anyway. But bear in mind lowering the priority will make it even slower.
  12. Same here (under 1 min). But that's old news. Everytime MS "fixes" it but at the next "Patch Friday" the way too long delay is back again... In case MS knows how to fix it (I doubt it by now), they clearly don't want to fix it (and a POS machine can wait for more than 1h before getting updates automatically, of course, so that's no big deal). Oh, well...
  13. It took 90min to find the updates for my alternate XP installation on the same i7 3770k... this time I hadn't previously installed the latest ie8 update... So, it really seems to be of little influence, if any, this time around.
  14. Cry rivers?
  15. Nobody reads my posts... snif! BTW, non-MS simple Silverlight Tester.