tarquel

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About tarquel

  • Rank
    The Well-wisher
  • Birthday 11/02/1979

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  • MSN
    nharmsworth@tarquel.net

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  • OS
    Windows 8.1 x64
  1. Hi all Planning to setup a (well, two really) super beast(s) of a MS SQL server. We have a pretty beefing Dell PowerEdge R710 that was running as part of a VMware ESXi/vSphere cluster, but now due to it being replaced with R810's, is free for this purpose. It uses SAS hotswap drives - up to 6 - and can do all the usual RAID levels. We really want to go for SSD's but, despite my googling at least, I'm not turning up much info about what would be the best setup to use. As far as native SSD's with SAS interfaces on them, there seems to be virtually no options. Have only really found: http://www.span.com/index.php?cPath=73_490_1475 but is pretty high in the pocket department (expected to some degree i know). I'm informed that Seagate are bringing out a SAS type of SSD next month but dont have the details to hand on that. Was wondering whether anyone out there has set up a SQL server with RAIDed [say a RAID 5 or 10) using SSD's or anything similar to what we are planning that might be able to suggest anything? Was also wondering if there was a way to use the existing caddy's we have, and somehow put a normal SATA SSD with some sort of adapter etc. [Excuse the lack of technical specifics here - i'm just thinking out loud while in a meeting about something else ] Cheers
  2. Hmmm.... Even though the motherboard supports flash drive booting, it doesnt mean that XP Setup will automatically see it though. I have seen it appear as another drive [when you come to repartitioning section of setup for example] on some systems, and on some I havent - where all of these systems support USB flash drive booting. It may sound silly but try placing the files at the root of the USB flash drive, plug the drive into one of the usb slots that are at the back of the motherboard and nearest to the PS2 connections [dont ask me why, but its woth a shot] and then turn on the computer and see if thats any better. Also, flashing your BIOS to the latest version may help the USB flash drive support. Of course, one of the best ways would be to slipstream drivers into your XP CD instead as mentioned in the above posts Regards Nath.
  3. Indeed [and I like your Avatar Mordac ]... Nath.
  4. @Jakebo - care to show me where it says you can do then? This is why I said what I said - the short answer is no. *IF* you had a Volume License Agreement and a Volume license of Vista then yes, you can use the previous version.... however, as the OP states that he/she bought the Dell PC with Vista on it, that is a OEM license and as such, does not give you any "previous version" rights.... But I'll take it all back if you can show me where I'm wrong. @ TheFlash428: No problem. It does seem strange they dont give the option but i guess they may not be able to with any new line product - but I cant say what the license agreement of a Royalty OEM is, as I'm not one naturally hehe Like I said and Jakebo said, your best bet is purchasing a OEM of Windows XP - although you will generally need to buy a mouse or something to go with it, as they are meant to be sold only with hardware. At least then you'll still have your Vista license ready for when your ready to take the plunge within the company. Depending on how many computers, servers, and MS software you have in the company, you might want to look at Volume licensing, as there are quite a few options to consider Regards Nath
  5. The short answer is no, it wouldnt be legal I'm afraid. If its a OEM license [i.e. it came with the laptop - you have the Vista COA stuck to the bottom of the laptop for example] then its for that OS, and that OS alone. If the laptop came with XP, and you purchased an upgrade to Vista [or got it via the Express Upgrade scheme] then I dont see why you couldn't install the laptop with a fresh copy of the XP that came with the laptop, but if not, then no, you cant install a copy from another machine. The OEM license is for that machine and that machine only alas. Regards Nath.
  6. Thanks Iceman.... but he's already tried the Repair option.. And yep, I've mentioned the problem of not having the Windows ME media But yes, the best way is a clean install indeed. Nath.
  7. Hi again. Havent got the time at the moment to answer you fully on this one - about to go and finish building a Core 2 Duo beast of a computer for a graphic designer / friend of mine - but I will say that like I said, because of the radically different hardware, chipse & CPU, I highly doubt its possible to achieve option 3. Option 2 is feasible [i've never - that I remember - actually upgraded a OS to XP, so I'm not sure whether exactly how it works]. If the XP Upgrade CD boots, then it should be the best bet, although you will need some 3rd party program to repartition further and squeeze / move things around to free up enough space. Option 1 may work, but will likely cause you problems down the way and further. Another option is to get hold of the Windows ME media - providing the machine in question has a COA attached to the chassis or with the manuals / CDs - and then you could install Windows ME cleanly, and then perform the upgrade I'll be back later. Regards Nath.
  8. Surprised no one has mentioned it [unless my eyes are failing me] but as you mentioned you have an up-to-date AV product, remember to use [a few] different repuatable Anti-Spyware products also just in case i.e. Windows Defender, Spybot - S & D, SpywareBlaster, and Ad-Aware SE Personal Edition. As they are all free, its worth a try It only take one small bit of spyware to cling on to 100% cpu usage and slug-mode will take place hehe Failing any spyware problems, it could be a multitude of H/W problems that you may or may not be able to find out without wiping your HDD [use the tool's from the manufacturer of the HDD first] and installing XP freshly If you still have problems, then its most likely to be faulty hardware. Regards Nath.
  9. Hello fellow welsh person and welcome to MSFN. Am I right in thinking that he bought a XP Upgrade CD pack, instead of a OEM CD pack? In either case, while upgrading from ME to XP may have worked, when changing the motherboard, I've noticed from the specs of either motherboard that the chipset [as you would expect] vary significantly, and this will ultimately be the reason XP has stopped booting up. An in-place repair of windows [which is what was suggested by the colleague of his] *can* work sometimes, but more often then not - especially in this set of vastly different changes - it was doomed to fail I think I would say that his best is to take the HDD out and either put it in a external USB caddy, or mount it as a slave drive in a working pc, so that he can get all the stuff off it he wants, as unless you are all prepared to put alot of work into it [which still may not work at the end of it], it will likely never boot again until he wipes it clean and starts with a fresh install of XP. If you want a chat on messenger, just send me a message [although make it later as currently I have no messenger access at work] Regards Nath.
  10. My suggestion is that if you are on a domain, the admin need to setup a WSUS server [effectively a local Microsoft Update server] on a member server which means you can leave Auto Updates On, and they can pick and choose which updates to allow installation of, and which not to. Its very easy to setup Cheers Nath.
  11. With the possible exception of .net 3.0, I would expect them to be built into Vista i.e. so you wont need to install them in Vista. I've never seen them as a option when using Windows Update in Vista so at this time I'd say that they are either included, or the install packages aren't released for Vista yet. Nath.
  12. Just to clear this up for everyone.... The topic starter is refering to a commercial version of xpcreate that GM no longer [that I am aware of] sells, in order to use it in a commercial sense. This, of course, doesnt mean that the commercial user [in this case, the topic starter's PC shop] of XPC can distribute the created CD [to a customer] - of course not, as that would be a breach of both the XP EULA & the MS SB OEM EULA, but so long as all it does is slipstream and "add functionality" that doesnt remove components or hack the installation, that is perfectly legal. The topic starter would have to "sysprep" the machine also to comply with the System Builder's EULA too - that the machine is provided to the customer "sealed". So, in short, yes - i cant see a problem in using a slipstreaming program to add legitimate hotfixes, Service Packs, and other updates - along with drivers also - into a install of XP, so long as you dont remove components or alter or use modified MS files in the process,and that you dont distribute the resulting CD. Only original hologramed media & COA fitted to the computer can be distributed along with this installed system. Hope that makes sense. Nath.
  13. No, what the other people that have replied to the topic are saying is that you install the first CD unatendedly - all that CD contains, is Server 2003 SP1. You can then use the folder/files from the 2nd CD to create a atuomated install that will run AFTER the first setup has taken place - such as in the GUIRunOnce for example. Manually trying to combine the two cd's [i'm guessing this is what you are trying to do from what you have posted] is unlikely to work - at least, I dont know anyone who has done it successfully, if it is even possible. If you didn't understand the commands you listed in the following post you made [ http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?act=ST...70&t=86777# ] then you are unlikely to suceed in trying to manually combine the two together that may or may not work. Read up on the unattended stuff on the third link at the top of the page [underneath Microsoft Sotware Forum Network] will help you understand those commands. Sorry if i sound nasty - is isn't meant to sound that way. Oh, and please dont bump your thread after two hours of waiting. You'll likely annoy people which will result in them not helping you hehe Cheers Nath
  14. Its got to be the classic's - C&C mainly - on the PC for me I think. I can't think of any other game [except possibly Final Fantasy Online] that comes close to the sheer amount of hours my friend & I have played that game for. Nath.
  15. As i just implied from my edit, it did work initially, but for some reason, vista setup just ignored it after a while lol Nothing to do with the answer file i dont think, as the same answer file worked fine on a floppy. Nath.