lcoughey

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About lcoughey

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  1. You now need to get a full sector-by-sector clone of the drive. I recommend using ddrescue, as it logs the unread sectors, allowing for multiple passes and can pickup where it left off, if you have to reboot the system. Edit: After you get the cleanest clone of the drive possible, then you can then run data recovery software against the stable drive.
  2. aha, I suspect that your problem is much larger than a firmware issue. In this case, if your data is important to you, send it to a qualified data recovery lab for an assessment...before it is too late. This implies a problem with the drive spinning. Could be a problem with the motor itself, or the PCB.] This implies that the heads are unable to read/write the drive. It could be because the drive is not spinning, at least not to full speed. Or, it could be that the heads are bad. Again, get a professional to assess the drive...otherwise, just get your warranty replacement. This is not a DIY job. Good luck! Luke
  3. Mork, We can definitely do, as can many other labs around the world. Just to fix the firmware issue, we charge $300cdn. If you want us to do further testing on the drive to ensure that the drive is stable, as well as transfer the data to another drive supplied by you, we do that for $500cdn. My company website is in my signature, if you want to contact me. Good luck!
  4. My guess is that the data recovery centre that you sent it to is trying to justify over charging for the service to repair your drive. There is a chance that there is media damage on the drive, but not very likely in this case. I've seen labs quote over $2500. The sad part is, people pay it.
  5. I agree that of the data on the drive may have more value for time than dollars. Ironically enough, many of theses Seagate fixes we have done were for personal users who just wanted access to their precious photos again. We did have a few users with these drive setup in a RAID 0 and they were very happy to pay $300 for a simple drive repair than $600 or more for the RAID recovery.
  6. It is nice to see that there is a DIY work around for these drives. However, I can also see that it can be frustrating. I work for a data recovery company and we offer to do the fix (without any further testing or mirroring of the drive) for $300...and it is a same day service. As most of you are doing the DIY solution because you can't afford to pay the big bucks of the big data recovery labs...or even the $300 we are charging, I'm curious to know what kind of price you would find reasonable to have your drive fixed so that you can access your data again. Perhaps, if your suggestions are doable, we'll make an adjustment to the pricing of this service.