TorontoOntario

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  1. Hi! Just to let you know: ST31000340AS SD1A 9QJ1FWYF I did the fix here ... thank gawd for this Forum! Everything worked fine afterwards. Suddenly, last week the HardDrive began to studder an' shudder and within 48 hours finally failed entirely. During my Google Search to discover if anyone else had suffered a similar fate, I was surprised to learn that many are now coming out of the woodwork with the same issue ... it failed ... fixed it ... upgraded Firmware ... HardDrive COMPLETELY died a month 'er so later. When I say COMPLETELY DIED ... that's it exactly. Where before the fix, BIOS would not recognize the HardDrive; now I have a problem where BIOS recognizes the HardDrive but Windows stalls out when the HardDrive is being loaded at StartUp ... and, occasionally when the HardDrive manages to get past the Windows StartUp, it remains inaccessible due to an "IO Error". An attempted recovery using PTTD and also other reliable Recovery Software miserably failed. I am not a Hard Drive Mechanic, but as near as I can tell after two days of trying to solve the mess so that I could maybe recover the data is this: The HardDrive continues to spin ... no clicking noises as experienced before the Fix as described in this Forum ... but the Sectors evidently have become inexplicably/completely corrupted. When attempting to restore the Partition Data using EASEUS Partition Recovery Wizard, the "time required" indicated over five hundred hours needed. My math tells me this is something like twenty days. After 5 hours of operation, the time had hardly changed ... so, obviously a lost cause. After I had fixed my HardDrive according to the instructions here, I asked if it was necessary to discard the HardDrive and the answer was "No". All the same, I was saving up some money to purchase a new HardDrive so that I could back-up the newly fixed one. At this point, a month or so later, I unfortunately ran out of time ... the HardDrive has completely and utterly failed. And, I am not the only one stating this experience on the Web. So, if I was a person who fixed their Seagate HardDrive by using the instructions here, I would make plans ASAP to back it up ... don't wait like I did ... it could suddenly fail again ... and much worse a failure than earlier experienced.
  2. Hi! Just to let you know: ST31000340AS SD1A 9QJ1FWYF I did the fix here ... thank gawd for this Forum! Everything worked fine afterwards. Suddenly, last week the HardDrive began to studder an' shudder and within 48 hours finally failed entirely. During my Google Search to discover if anyone else had suffered a similar fate, I was surprised to learn that many are now coming out of the woodwork with the same issue ... it failed ... fixed it ... upgraded Firmware ... HardDrive COMPLETELY died a month 'er so later. When I say COMPLETELY DIED ... that's it exactly. Where before the fix, BIOS would not recognize the HardDrive; now I have a problem where BIOS recognizes the HardDrive but Windows stalls out when the HardDrive is being loaded at StartUp ... and, occasionally when the HardDrive manages to get past the Windows StartUp, it remains inaccessible due An attempted recovery using PTTD and also other reliable Recovery Software miserably failed. I am not a Hard Drive Mechanic, but as near as I can tell after two days of trying to solve the mess so that I could maybe recover the data is this: The HardDrive continues to spin ... no clicking noises as experienced before the Fix as described in this Forum ... but the Sectors evidently have become inexplicably/completely corrupted. When attempting to restore the Partition Data using EASEUS Partition Recovery Wizard, the "time required" indicated over five hundred hours needed. My math tells me this is something like twenty days. After 5 hours of operation, the time had hardly changed ... so, obviously a lost cause. After I had fixed my HardDrive according to the instructions here, I asked if it was necessary to discard the HardDrive and the answer was "No". All the same, I was saving up some money to purchase a new HardDrive so that I could back-up the newly fixed one. At this point, a month or so later, I unfortunately ran out of time ... the HardDrive has completely and utterly failed. And, I am not the only one stating this experience on the Web. So, if I was a person who fixed their Seagate HardDrive by using the instructions here, I would make plans ASAP to back it up ... don't wait like I did ... it could suddenly fail again ... and much worse a failure than earlier experienced.
  3. There are a lot of misunderstandings going on on this topic, your question may be the occasion to attempt clearing some of them. jaclaz Thanks for replying to the question I was asking. MUCH appreciated!
  4. EXACTLY! This is the identical configuration I used to remedy my HardDrive too. Worked like a charm for me on first try. Needless to say: the critical ingredient was the communication parameters to use through HyperTerminal. We owe a tremendous gratitude to the person who started this Thread. I am sure that it has saved alot of people a helluva lot of grief; not to mention a near cost-free ability to recover their data. I have a question which you might be able to clarify for me: I can't seem to decipher from the photo how you managed to connect to the Adapter ... was it via Serial or USB Port?
  5. Hi! I am asking this question only so that I don't have to search through this entire Thread for the answer ... ummm, are there people actually reporting that regardless of following the instructions here that their HardDrive never recovered? And, if so, what was the reason given for such a circumstance? I thought that the HardDrives were failing only because of a Firmware fault and that the remedy was to 'unlock' the busy state in order to update the Firmware. Are these HardDrives also failing because they are basically a bad product too? Is anyone recommending that the HardDrive be remedied only to enable recovery of the data to a entirely new HardDrive and ditching the Seagate altogether? Thanks!
  6. I got the one Gradius recommended from Sparkfun. I powered the hard drive by the sata power connector from a pc, as the dell laptop I used is the only system I have with a serial port. Could it be that the 2 aa batteries arent putting out enough power? Tester shows ±3.2V. I was just worried about accidentally shorting out and killing my drive.. more. So, it does appear from what you are saying that everything is connected properly; meaning to say your Adapter and HardDrive is powered up an' stuff. Did you first try a Loop-Back test (dry run) prior to actually connecting the RX/TX to the HardDrive? In this way you can begin to isolate any problem step by step. You first confirm that your Adapter is functioning properly by the Loop-Back test. The HyperTerminal Loop-Back test is explained in this Thread at some point. Once you know that your Loop-Back test was successful, then you know that there is no problem with the Adapter. After successfully testing your Adapter via Loop-Back, the other hic-up you might experience is that you have the RX/TX wires to/from the Adapter (to HardDrive) incorrectly reversed. So, switch 'em on the HardDrive if this hic-up occurs. Then power-up your HardDrive and go for the Hyper-Terminal-Ride and everything should work as advertised. It gets kinna' konphuzin' when you say that your SATA HardDrive is being powered by connecting to a PC while using the Serial Port which is located on your LapTop. I have no idea if there might be possible voltage tolerance/compatibility issues between a PC PowerSupply and that of a LapTop. Your original Post was asking about the PCB heating up. I never had a reason to investigate this issue when I was doing my own remedy and so I can't be of much help to you on that one. Where are you located in Canada? I am in Toronto/Ontario
  7. Hi! Yes, it does appear that you have the Adapter hooked up correctly. You have two issues to resolve: 1. Power to the Adapter 2. Power to the HardDrive. Problem I have is comprehending how you decided to power-up your HardDrive. I myself powered the Adapter from the computer's Power Supply (via the on-board Molex Connector) which is standard on every computer which can supply to both IDE and SATA Drives. This meant that I did not have to use batteries. This is the Adapter I used: Pololu Deluxe Serial Adapter http://www.robotshop.ca/pololu-serial-adapter.html My failed HardDrive was powered up by using the computer's standard SATA Power Connector which I plugged in as normal. I had two wires connected to the RED and BLACK power supply (those which feed into a Molex Connector; aka: IDE power supply connector). These two wires (RED/BLACK) then connected to their respective feed on the Adapter which is RED to VCC and BLACK to GROUND. RED is POWER and BLACK is GROUND. DO NOT USE THE YELLOW WIRE and additional black wire which is also part of the Molex Connector. Since my ASUS MotherBoard had a COM 1 Serial Port (unused/dormant) I connected a Serial Header to it which had a male end which I then inserted to the female end of the Adapter. That's how I myself rigged things up. It's rather easy if you remove the side panel off your Computer Case and connect to both the power and serial port which might already be available there. Then it's only a matter of purchasing the Adapter and some appropriate wiring/connectors. The real nuisance I found was hooking up the actual wiring itself. It's better to buy wiring like these described below rather than messing around with solder an' whatever. SFE Break Away Headers - Straight http://www.robotshop.ca/sfe-straight-pin-headers.html NetMedia 10" Jumper Wire Kit http://www.robotshop.ca/netmedia-10inch-jumper-wires.html SFE 170mm F/F Premium Jumper Wires http://www.robotshop.ca/sfe-170mm-ff-premi...mper-wires.html SFE 170mm M/M Premium Jumper Wires http://www.robotshop.ca/sfe-170mm-mm-premi...mper-wires.html Things can get confusing when reading all the instructions contained in this Thread because there are varying computer configurations which people have. For instance, some might have a COM Port (Serial Interface) on their MotherBoard but need to purchase a Serial Header to connect to it like this: http://www.frontx.com/pro/cpx102_2.html Others may not have the COM 1 Serial Port and so have to go the alternative using something like this: Sabrent 1 Ft USB 2.0 to Serial DB9 Male RS-232 Cable Adapter http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/Sea...63&CatId=77 Some might find connecting to the live power supply on their computers somewhat risky and awkward and so might have to obtain a battery similar to this: CR2032 Battery http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/Sea...&CatId=2623 Anyways, sorry for the long story; I am just trying to be helpful to anyone reading this Thread.
  8. Ummmm, there are FOUR connections to the Adapter: (1) RX (2) TX (3) GND (4) VCC [power] Numbers 1 & 2 above connect from Adapter to HardDrive Numbers 3 & 4 above connect from Adapter to power-supply As for your question about PCB 'getting hot', I really don't know as I never had a need to investigate while conducting my own procedure.
  9. Hi! The first thing I said to myself after reading your Post was, "Too bad yer not livin' closer to Canada". Anyways, about the parts you were askin' 'bout: Maybe you should have detailed your configuration more specifically in your Post. Everything but the communication parameters to the HardDrive (HyperTerminal) will vary depending on your computer configuration. What everyone must first do is determine their computer configuration; after all, when it's all said and done, the remedy can only be accomplished entirely by communicating directly with your HardDrive and it's the configuration of your computer which will determine how you are going to 'wire-everything-up' in order to do this. So, there are two configuration questions which everyone must resolve first: 1. Am I using a Serial Port or a USB Port to connect to the Adapter? 2. Am I using the on-board power source of my computer (Molex) or the alternative of a Battery PowerSupply. Unless you can answer these two questions first, you cannot proceed to the next step of connecting/communicating with your HardDrive. It's all quite simple, really. Everything is quite simple to remedy the HardDrive; but you must first answer the two questions I outlined above. In my particular case, I used the Serial Port and the on-board power supply. I never had to solder anything nor did I require the use of a BreadBoard/ProtoBoard. Nor did I use a battery power-supply. So, how 'bout telling us the answer to the two questions first and then maybe I can send you the parts as you requested; but I don't want to be sending you a part that is incompatible to your configuration.
  10. Hello! From Toronto/Canada I reported my successful Seagate HardDrive fix to http://www.mapleleafmountain.com/seagatebrick.html and he suggested that I also report it here; including the fact that I am quite willing to sell the required peripherals to anyone requiring them to remedy their Seagate as per the Thread (at the same cost that I myself have paid for them). You can easily price these components at robotshop.ca where I originally purchased them. Alternatively, I am willing to remedy your Seagate HardDrive for a small fee if you are local to Toronto. I say 'local' to Toronto meaning that you can avoid the cost of shipping your HardDrive to me by simply delivering it to my door. It may be that you could stay throughout the fix and leave with your HardDrive afterwards. The fix shouldn't take more than, say, 30 minutes at most. But this is just a hurried idea that I thought I should throw in here ... I haven't really thought it through much. But after reading here about all the instances of people trying to negotiate through the instructions and having to source the required parts/peripherals to conduct the remedy, I figured that I could construct a ready-made configuration here where a person could simply drop in and hook up their failed drive to a pre-configured System and do the HyperTerminal communication and be on their merry way. Anyways, all that I can say is that the instructions indexed here as well at the mapleleafmountain Site are more than sufficient to allow anyone to remedy their HardDrive. You really don't need me nor anyone else to hold your hand through it all. There is no need to be intimidated nor discouraged by the task. Trust me, it can very easily be done by following the instructions in this Thread. When my own was remedied, all my data/files reappeared completely intact. Afterwards, I perfomed the Seagate Firmware Upgrade as instructed here too. My HardDrive suddenly failed and was not at all recognized by BIOS nor OS. I am running with Windows 2003 Enterprise x86; Intel Pentium 4 640, 3200 MHz. I plugged in a Serial Port Header to the Serial Connector which was native to my ASUS MotherBoard; the PowerSupply was sourced through a Molex Connector; I used a Pololu Deluxe Serial Adapter from http://www.robotshop.ca/pololu-serial-adapter.html to communicate to the HardDrive using HyperTerminal. This sure beats shipping your HardDrive to Seagate in the USA and hoping they leave your confidential data/files intact. THANK YOU TO ALL WHO MADE THE EFFORT OF CREATING THESE INSTRUCTIONS.