ChunkDog

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About ChunkDog

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    Your Comp, My Bitch!
  • Birthday 12/31/1981

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  1. The only software that I've come accross that can convert a dynamic disk back to basic reliably is Paragon Partition Manager. Hope that helps you out
  2. I have to agree on this, as it is just dumbing down the users, and making the technicians jobs harder. All though, Vista would search a folder created with the customers backup after a reinstall too, so maybe it might of made our jobs easier, lol. I have to totally disagree here. I use the Windows Key all the time, and allows power users to navigate the OS quicker, if you take advantage of it. Just take for instance "Windows Key + E" to open Windows Explorer, or "Windows Key + R" to open the run command, just those two alone used by someone knowledgeable, can navigate to any area of the OS with the keyboard much quicker than using the GUI. If anything, they should extend on it, and add even more shortcut keys, and allow them to be remapped too.
  3. Wow, thanks for all the replies. I was considering Hex Editing the BIOS to add the custom serial number, then flashing the board, but I'm afraid that the BIOS image would not be reconstructed correctly for use in flashing. I know about changing the Logo, witch we plan on doing, but how do companies like DELL and HP put a serial number in their BIOS images? or is there something else in play for them to achieve this.
  4. Hi, I work for a small computer company that builds quite a few systems. Our systems are of course custom built, and each one has a serial number on the case witch is used to track the system. Now we would like to add the machines serial number to the BIOS or the Windows installation. We are using Everest to generate reports on the system's we build and service, and would like that custom serial number to show up in these reports. Thanks in advance for the help.
  5. Well, I put everything back to stock speeds, and am no longer getting the problem, but i have had a crash to desktop once after an hour of gameplay, but that's minor, and probably just a bug. I will report back as to what I oc'ed was the problem, though I think it was the CPU. Thanks for the help.
  6. I'm running the latest ATI Drivers, and I also used Driver cleaner after using the ATI Uninstall Utility just to be thorough. I'm Also running an Abit motherboard with an 865PE chipset from Intel.
  7. Ok, well here it goes: I just recently upgraded my graphics card from a Radeon AIW 9700 Pro 128mb to a Radeon X850Pro 256mb, both are AGP. The switch went flawless, or so I thought, and started fragging away. Well, I noticed a strange problem that seemed random at first, but on further inspection noticed that it would more than likely happen when the X850Pro was rendering fog type effects, like dust, of smoke, but occasionally would happen just because. Now the problem is that my frame rate will just all of the sudden drop tremendously, and the only way to alleviate the problem is to restart the system. After noticing this behaviour, I started to troubleshoot. First I tried Task manager, but that was no help, so then I tried Process Explorer. Basically Process Explorer was showing me 50% CPU utilization with the "Hardware Interrupts". I have tried turning off "Allocate IRQ For VGA" in the BIOS, but that had no effect. I was trying to find a program that would monitor or log Hardware Interrupts in real time, so as to narrow down the device causing the problems (Although I'm sure it's my new graphics card). Any Help would be great, thanks. I just tried flashing my BIOS, and this in turn reset the CMOS settings. Still having the same Problem. My System: Abit IS7 P4 3.06ghz (oc'ed to 3.58ghz) 2x 512mb Corsair XMS LLP (2-2-5-2) at 1:1 with FSB Radeon X850 Pro (oc'ed to 540 core, 550 memory) not the stock cooler of course Creative Audigy 2 Platinum WD 250gb IDE
  8. I thought I'd bump this because I want more people to see it. Sorry if this against the rules
  9. I believe changing your drive to a Dynamic Disk will give you this functionality also, but you might want to research into it further before making that decision to upgrade a disk to a Dynamic one, because it is not reversible.
  10. heres a nice utility called "Control Registration Utility" that works very well, it's a GUI front end for Microsoft's REGSVR32, and makes it easy to see whats registered, and then unregister the crap you dont want.
  11. Thank you far all the replies, good stuff. I have finally found a correct way to do it. PSEXEC is needed, and some knowledge about windows. Basically the problem I was having before when using PSEXEC was that when you load windows explorer, it inherits permissions from the original copy loaded when logging into the system. For example, If I log into the system as "user", the first copy of explorer is loaded with "user" account's privileges, so when running explorer again to view Windows Explorer, it has to inherit the permissions from the originally loaded explorer.exe, wich in this scenario is "user". The workaround is to logon normaly, then end the task "explorer.exe", then load a command prompt for the PSEXEC command. Now we cxan load explorer.exe with local system rights with the command: psexec -s -i -d c:\windows\explorer.exe This will reload explorer with system rights. Give it a try!
  12. Well, I tried to search the forum about this, but came up dry. I would like to be able to run programs on an nt system using the local "System" account. I have tried out psexec from sysinternals, but it does not seem to work for my needs. I mainly would like to run Windows Explorer using the system account, and a few other thiongs as well. Any help or ideas would be great. Thanks in advance. Title Edited - Please follow new posting rules from now on. --Zxian
  13. I've been using this for a while now, and it's been awsome so far, and it's free.
  14. I didn't give it too much thought, but I think there cousins, or it's a trick question to confuse you.