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About CylonWolf

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  • OS
    Windows 7 x86
  1. Yes and no. The advantage of having ALL the devices involved (the PC, the converter and the disk) powered by the same PSU is that you won't have the need to ground everything together in order to avoid possible ground loops (and consequent gibberish on the terminal). Having a separate power supply implies the need for accurate grounding, but it is easier to remove power off the disk. With a single PSU, you simply pull off the disk power connector, then switch off the PC and reboot and re-connected it (and this is more or less likely to take the suggested 60 seconds). Please consider also (see the recommended guide by CarterinCanada: ) how the actual powering off of the disk drive may be needed or may be needed not. jaclaz Thanks for this...between this reassurance and CarterinCanada's guide (a great guide by the way) I just succesfully reset my drive and Im backing up as we speak . Hopefully itll finish copying all of the files before the drive experiences anymore issues Very exciting to see what files I had forgotten about that are on this drive. Thanks again everyone involved in putting this guide together!
  2. Hi, I apologize in advance if Im asking something thats been posted somewhere, but Ive not seen anything regarding it so far. I have my adapter setup, Ive did the loopback test to make sure everything is working with it, so basically ready to start the actual procedure. The adapter is USB powered (its this one:, so no need to hook it up to the power supply. What Im particularly nervous about is powering the HDD. My plan was to use the same power supply that is in my terminal computer...power off the computer, plug everything in, and power back on before proceeding... but if I need to power cycle the drive at some point, this could be an issue. Is it much better to use a stand alone power supply to power the HDD only?
  3. Hey guys, so Ive finally gotten around to getting the parts needed to (hopefully) fix my drive. However, I want to clarify one thing that I cant find the answer to before I proceed. Even after reading the stickies and whatnot, I still cant say with 100% certainty that my drive is a victim of this firmware issue, although Im pretty certain this is the case. If its actually some other issue that provides the same symptoms, will I damage the drive by doing this? I guess at this point maybe it doesnt matter, either I get my data back or I dont, but I do have to wonder.
  4. I feel bad asking this because Im sure its been covered in 160 pages, but here goes anyhow: I had a Seagate 750GB HDD disappear in Windows last week. Doesnt appear in BIOS either, and noticed when it was hooked up (Ive unhooked it for now) that the HDD light was on solid. From what Ive been able to find out on the issue, this sounds like the BSY state bug. However, Seagate tells me that based on my serial number, my drive is not affected...they say there is a firmware update available, but my drive is not affected by this particular firmware issue. The person I spoke with believed I probably just had a failed drive...talked like they had identified all HDDs affected by this issued, but from what I have found in this thread, it sounds like theyve been a little less than honest on this issue. My question is, will the method mentioned on this board work for me, or is my only chance of recovery through a data recovery service?