WinOutreach4

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About WinOutreach4

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    Windows 7 x64
  1. Hi Rajeshjohn, RunSynchronous is not a component of Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup. It is a component of Microsoft-Windows-Deployment. I would recommend that you use the Windows System Image Manager (WSIM) to create and edit your answer files, as this cannot happen when using WSIM. It also has a validation feature to help ensure the file is structured properly. Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro The Springboard Series on TechNet
  2. MDT can work from a regular workstation, either by putting all data on the USB/DVD or you can just have the boot image on the USB/DVD and MDT will pull the data across the network from the deployment share. Since you state that you are just learning, I’ll leave a few links for you. These two videos are a great introduction to MDT: Deployment Day Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012 Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced In addition, there are many articles and videos on the Deploy Windows 7 and Deploy Windows 8 pages of the Springboard Series on TechNet to help learn about deploying Windows. There are also many videos on Channel 9 about deploying Windows. Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
  3. Both Synchronous commands are set to <Order>1</Order>. They can't both be first, one of them must be order 2. This can be seen in the examples on the Order page of the Unattended Windows Setup Reference on TechNet. You may want to use the Windows System Image Manager to create your unattend files, as the validation feature can help catch errors. The Windows SIM is a part of the WAIK and WADK. Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team - IT Pro The Springboard Series on TechNet
  4. Tripredacus is correct… the server needs to be setup before you can do anything remotely. Even then, unless you are using System Center Configuration Manager, someone would have to hit F12 to start the PXE boot process. Please see the TechNet article ‘Zero-Touch, High-Volume Deployment’. If Configuration Manager is not an option, you will have to go with a 'Lite-Touch deployment'. It would be possible (using MrJinje’s easy way) to setup the server image in MDT, then mail a bootable USB key with the media that MDT creates loaded on it, then walk them through booting to USB and anything that you are not able to automate. In the Video ‘Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced’ at about the 27 minute mark, using a UFD (USB Flash Drive) is discussed. Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro The Springboard Series on TechNet
  5. Have you checked any of the log files to see if there are any errors? This ‘Ask the core Team’ blog post gives locations for MDT log files. Also, The TechNet article ‘Understanding Failures and Log Files’ shows the locations of various log files created by Windows Setup that may help find the issue. I’d recommend using the SLSHARE setting in your deployment share rules to automatically collect all the MDT logs in your deployment share for ease of troubleshooting. If you search for SLSHARE in the MDT help files, it explains how to set it up. The only other thing I can think of is that maybe there is an answer file in a higher priority location. The TechNet article ‘Methods for Running Windows Setup’ has a chart with the implicit answer file search order that will show you where to check. Just out of curiosity, did you capture the image with a sysprep and capture task sequence in MDT, or some other method? Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro The Springboard Series on TechNet
  6. If you use the Windows System Image Manager (WSIM) that is built into the ADK, it will show you where it is possible to add the components. Some can go in several of the passes, but where you put them depends on exactly what you are trying to do. For your example of the tutorial where settings were put in the PE pass (assuming they were language settings), that automates the setup language selection. So you would not see the language selection screen any more during the beginning of a deployment. You would have to also add it in the OOBE pass to set the deployed OS language. It may be in your best interest to also install the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT). MDT is a free task based deployment solution that uses the tools in the ADK (and more) to simplify deployments. You do not need to write your own answer files, as MDT will build it for you based on the settings you specify in the task sequence. It can also manage device drivers and install other software during the deployment process. These two videos area great introduction to MDT: Deployment Day Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012 Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced If you also have a Windows Server, MDT can use the WDS role to deploy over the network using PXE booting. More information on MDT and the ADK are available on the Deliver and Deploy Windows 8 page of the Springboard Series on TechNet Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
  7. According to the TechNet article "How to Split a Windows Image (.swm) File to Span Across Multiple DVDs": In Windows 8, Windows Setup does not support installing from split .wim files. However, you can use DISM to apply the image to the destination computer with the /Apply-Image option. The TechNet article 'Image Management Command-Line Options' shows the DISM command line options with examples. For this issue, the example shown is "Dism /apply-image /imagefile:install.swm/swmfile:install*.swm /index:1 /applydir:d:\" More helpful information about using DISM with Windows 8 can be found on the Deliver and Deploy Windows 8 page of the Springboard Series on TechNet. Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
  8. The Productkey setting can also be placed in the WindowsPE pass (you didn't post your real product key on a public forum, did you?). This TechNet article explains the difference in the two locations as: "Use the ProductKey setting in the Microsoft-Windows-Setup component to specify the Windows image to install during Windows setup… And later: " Use this ProductKey (specialize pass) setting to specify a different Product Key to activate Windows." So you should be putting the product key in the WindowsPE pass to select the image to install and activate. The ProductKey setting in the Specialize pass will be used to try to activate Windows if it is different from the one in the WindowsPE pass. The specialize pass ProductKey should not be needed. More information on Unattended deployments can be found on the Springboard Series pages on TechNet. Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
  9. Unfortunately, the previous methods you used in conjunction with previous operating system deployments to copy the task bar icons from one image to another will not work the same when it comes to imaging Windows 8. This can be seen in the TechNet article Basic Windows Deployment Step-by-Step Guide, under section 3.2 'Customize the default user profile' where it states: "Note that items that are pinned to the taskbaror to the Start screen are not copied to the default user profile." Setting the pinned items to a customized default setting would have to be done in another manner, such as scripting. This TechNet forum thread links to a script written for Windows 7 / Windows Server 2008R2, however another forum member tested and claims it works on Windows 8 / Windows Server 2012. Furthermore, the TechNet article DoNotCleanTaskBar also states that this setting was only used to copy deskbands, which is a customized toolbar that can be added to the taskbar. With that said, this setting will not be able to pull the pinned taskbar items to the default user profile. More information about deploying Windows 8 can be found on the Deliver and Deploy Windows 8 page of the Springboard Series on TechNet. David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
  10. If you use Setup.exe to install Windows Vista to the C drive of a machine, and then capture that image, it will resolve the issue for you. This MS support article explains this. Basically, running setup solves this issue upon install, but applying the image with Imagex does not. Creating a custom image (even if you don't customize anything) and using that for your deployment should solve this issue. Another suggestion would be to only have one partition on the disk but assign it as D in your Diskpart script. Lastly, older versions of the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit used Setup.exe to apply the images, while MDT 2012 Update 1 does not, as shown in this TechNet blog article. So If you use the link to download MDT 2010 Update 1, and set that up with your Vista image, it will install without this error. Further information on deploying Windows can be found onthe Springboard Series on TechNet. Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
  11. The easiest method to add language packs to your deployment image is to use DISM to mount the offline image and add the language packs. This TechNet article explains in detail: How to Add and Remove Language Packs Offline. While it is possible to use the unattend file to install language packs, the Multilingual Deployment Overview lists a number of items to consider before choosing a specific method of installation. For example: "If you add a language pack to a Windows image in a Windows PE environment, you must add page file support to Windows PE". Adding packages through the unattend file happens in theWindows PE environment during the Offline Servicing pass, so this method would be more complicated than just adding it to the offline image with DISM. More information about using DISM and deploying Windows 8 can be found on the Deliver and Deploy Windows 8 page of the Springboard Series on TechNet. Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
  12. As a Microsoft representative, I cannot comment on 3rd party imaging tools. However, you might also want to take a look at the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) for your imaging and deployment needs. MDT is a free solution that uses file based imaging rather than sector based imaging. It also manages device drivers, packages and software outside of the image. This allows you to update those items without recreating your images. MDT can also be used with DVDs or USB drives, or over the network using WDS or SCCM. A great video to show you how powerful and flexible your deployments can be with MDT: DeploymentDay Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012 Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
  13. If your company has Volume Licensing with Software Assurance, then you already have access to the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP). MDOP has several tools to help IT Pros, one of which is the Diagnostic and Recovery Toolset (DaRT). DaRT includes 14 tools including Locksmith (for resetting passwords), Defender to scan for viruses while Windows is offline, File Restore to recover deleted files, Crash Analyzer and more. With DaRT, you can create a bootable image that can be used from USB, CD, DVD, deployed locally to workstations, or via network boot. There are many articles and videos that will help you at the Diagnostic and Recovery Toolset page of the Springboard Series on TechNet. Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
  14. Another method to accomplish your goals would be to use the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) for your deployments. MDT allows you to run 'PostInstallation' tasks. This will allow your scripts to run during the deployment process while not having to modify your answer file at all. In addition, MDT can install software, updates and manage device drivers for you. No need to keep separate images for different departments based on software needs. Applications groups can be configured and selected at deployment to configure the image as needed. MDT can also deploy Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, Server 2003, 2008, 2008 R2 and 2012. This allows you to manage all of your OS deployments in one convenient tool. It also integrates with WDS for PXE deployments and multicasting, and SCCM for Zero-Touch installations. This short video (4:21) will give a quick overview of how MDT can help you save time and effort in your deployments: Deployment Workbench in Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 More information about the benefits of MDT can be foundon the Deliver and Deploy Windows 7 page of the Springboard Series on TechNet. Hope this helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT pro
  15. The AuditSystem and AuditUserpasses only work when you are booting into AuditMode . TechNet has this article that explains How Configuration Passes Work. It also explains that non-boot-critical drivers can be installed in the OfflineServicing pass as well, and this is explained further in the Understanding Device Drivers and Deployment article and in the Add and Remove Drivers Offline article. This latter article also has an XML example that pulls the drivers from the network, so there is no need to inflate the size of your image with drivers for all of the possible hardware you might use. I would also like to re-iterate my suggestion above to look at MDT. MDT can manage device drivers for all of your hardware and will install the appropriate drivers upon deployment for you without needing to put all drivers into the image. Also, if a new version of a driver is released, you simply make the change in MDT, rather than loading your image, changing the driver and re-capturing the image. Hope this Helps, David Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro