BudwS

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BudwS last won the day on June 23

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  1. Some of the small people have a computer skill set greater than the Lord of the Castle. This was a tablet laptop and the display was rotated 180 degrees. The Lord did not know that was possible. A short seminar was required for the Lord. Perhaps it was an "Oh-Oh" moment for the small ones as well like "What did we do?" and "How do we fix this." and "I hope they don't find this before we go home." I have the occasional impulse to see what happens when a different key is pushed. Sometimes it's a learning experience and sometimes it's "Oh C***." This time it appears to be a "No harm, no fault" moment. The Deep Impression moment was that the password was reset. That was the learning experience for me. Didn't know that could be done on a none server connected computer.
  2. Grandchildren and nieces and nephews of a young age. Other details are not known. Pure speculation may be required.
  3. A Win 10 feature that was new to me: A Win 10 neighbor had small visiting relatives and when they went home the Win 10 laptop could not be logged onto with the normal password. If one is logged onto Win 10 with a Microsoft password then a server password reset feature is available. Working at a university this feature was used quite a lot for users who logged onto the server. By using the Win 10 online password reset, using Safari on the iPhone, the laptop password was reset and the neighbor was very happy with Microsoft. The appropriate security procedure worked to verify that the password reset was actually requested by the laptop owner. Had not thought about logging on to a Win 10 system with an online Microsoft logon was like logging onto a university server computer. To me, this made a "Deeper Impression."
  4. A good day for crap: 2 out of 2 computers updated to 16241 on their first try. OK, several hours to complete this task is a little long. OK, one computer looked like it was searching for an available source to download the update before the download actually started. OK, why does the CPU run close to 100% before the update seems to really start. OK, I'm impressed that the update software can drive the storage device at close to 100% thru-put for long periods of time. Seems like a lot of activity just to accomplish the update? OK, the restart takes a long time, too. Other than a few "OKs", Win10, 16241 is running "OK." Arizona, a lot of rain actually made it to the ground. OK!
  5. Except in Phoenix, AZ with the "Heat Dome" that suspends the "where" and the "why for" with "certainty" as we all know,,,,, Who knew that water could fall out of the sky? Except here it looks like the water is falling but then it isn't! This "flux" thing is difficult to understand. Probably an OS (Outer Space) thing.
  6. Some good crap: The Dual Boot PC, Win 7/Win10 Dell, is now updated to Win10, 16237. Did an iso clean boot to an old release, 15063, and wiped the Win10 HDD as part of the process. (Each OS has its own HDD) Had used BCDEDIT to verify the dual boot controls which got changed to reflect the new Win10 information. Today's load of crap is fertilizer. Monsoon Arizona: Water falling from the sky, now that's a change! Still don't understand why the update runs the CPU at close to 100% at some periods and the HDD at close to 100% at other periods? Or why it takes several hours to complete? It's probably just a computer thing.
  7. Perhaps, we need to follow the money that MS gets from advertising and marketing hooks set in W10. And what about data tracking? The W10 computer doesn't have to compute as long as money is generated by the background software that gathers information to sell or provides advertisement to market products. The money trail explains a lot when trying to understand why things are done the way they're done today. Conspiracy theory? No, just marketing protocol. My computer that refuses to update to the next W10 release is becoming more valuable every day. Arizona: Maybe it's just the heat. (Monsoon may start over the weekend!)
  8. Mixed Crap: 2 out of 3 computers updated W10 Insider Preview to 16232. One was an SSD and one was an HDD. One came from 16226 and one came from 15025. Both took several hours to complete the update. The third computer tried 5 times times to update to 16232, 4 times from 16226 and 1 time from 16216 but never completed the update. The end result of the update was that the computer was back at the release that it started from after several hours on each try. This may be the smart computer that refuses to upgrade to another questionable Win 10 release? This is a dual boot, Win 7/Win 10. The computer is now running WIndows 7 Pro as the main choice. Yup, more Arizona heat.
  9. Yes, I'm wondering the same thing. WarpDisk is now bookmarked on that computer. Thanks, the future is now.
  10. I agree with your opinion. However, in the real world, Tucson, Arizona, schools and learning have been allotted a very low priority. Also, the directive of the Technology Department at the school stated that no teachers, students and some computer technicians were to change any settings on the computer classroom equipment, hardware or software. Perhaps Arizona education attitudes are what has put Arizona close to the bottom on the list of states in the US. Perhaps a donation from another country would help us out? On the bright side, at least some of the students have iPhones and iPads that they use at home instead of the old PCs at school. Remember, we're talking Arizona with temperatures high enough to hurt students brains (115-120 degrees) and maybe the politicians brains as well. I remember the one room school house that I attended that had no computers at all but that was before computers. We were not concerned about "boot times" at all. Wow, we've come a long way in 65 years. Now I understand that slow computers are crap but the students and teachers still don't get to speed up there slow computers. Even if I gave the school an SSD they would refuse to install it because of the "policy." Yes, that's crap but this is the crap forum.
  11. SSD: The Windows 7 Pro Dell Latitude E5410 laptop: 40 seconds from push power on button to usable desktop. This is the system that the Win 10 computers are compared against. This computer when it had an HDD took over a minute to make the same boot up. I started replacing HDDs with SSDs about 5 years ago, both PATA and SATA, both Apple and PC. The results have always been the same, SDD computers have been 5 to 10 times faster than HDD computers. Slow is Crap when using computers! As an aside, I've seen students in a computer classroom spending 5 to 10 minutes waiting for their HDD PCs to boot up to a usable device. That's a lot of wasted learning time in class.
  12. One example of power on to W10 desktop usable: Both computers have W10, 16226 Insider Preview. 1. SSD. Apple MacBook, Late 2006. 2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo. 4 GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM. Power on to Apple host; select Startup device BootCamp and Restart; logon to W10 and Desktop is usable. Time: 2 minutes 45 seconds. 2. HDD. Dell Inspiron 1720, Ship date, 5/28/2008. 2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo. 4 GHz 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM. Power on to dual boot; select W10. logon to W10 and Desktop is usable. Time: 4 minutes 35 seconds. Yes, a simplistic comparison but gives an indication of the value of the SSD. Crap differential, about 2 minutes waiting for the HDD to spin. (Arizona: 106 degrees, nice cool down)
  13. W10 Crap Update or Downdate, Whichever: No problems to report on the 2 W10, 16226 test computers in the last 4 days. No, wait. Both have been powered off. I guess that tells you something. (Arizona: 115-120 degrees)
  14. Ghostery is an Invasive meter that can be used with a browser to see how many invaders are trying to use your computer. A few sites have logged up several hundred invasive strikes. So far, MS sites seen to be facilitating invasiveness the most. However, there are other sites that count up into the hundreds as well. Perhaps Ghostery could be used as a Crap meter?
  15. Perhaps I have been mistaken for another computer person. At present my only real PC computer has Windows 7 Pro installed on it. If I need to use Windows, that is the computer of use. Even the Dell laptop used for the Windows 10 Insider Preview has a dual boot Windows 7 Pro for intelligent computing when needed. Invasive is a word reserved for Windows 10. I don't lock down W10 as much as NoelC except when I power down the W10 computer.