JASpurrier3

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About JASpurrier3

  1. Well, I tried OSCDimg before and it did not work. The reason is CDImage v2.52 compresses the file a little differently than all the rest. The length of the ISO made is exactly the same as OSCDimg, but there are random little bytes that are changed. I actually viewed it in a Hex editor. The signatures are also different. CDImage v2.52 puts a string in the ISO that says, "Contact jmaxson or arunku". OSCDimg v2.45 puts in a string inthe ISO that says, "Contact danlo or nathann". That and other minor differences are the reason I need the Official Version of CDImage v2.52.
  2. Haha. OK, let me try a new approach. 1. I have an ISO of Microsoft Vista Files. 2. I want to decompress those files. 3. I want to then compress those same files and create an ISO. 4. I want the NEW iso to contain the same MD5 as the OLD iso. I can only do that with the official CDImage v2.52. Where is CDImage v2.52? I see no reason why I can't create an ISO myself with the exact same MD5 if I am using the exact same file and the exact same tool. (I DON'T HAVE THE TOOL!) (This has nothing to do with specific releases, my example was to make it EASIER to comprehend.) Any questions? Let's pretend I have the official MSDN release of Vista! That does not change my question, method, or even original examples of code from my first post. Why are we fighting about this? *****MY QUESTION: Does anyone have the official CDImage v2.52?*****
  3. My sincere appologies to you, LLXX. -JASpurrier3
  4. Haha, this is great. A real moderator is going to close this Thread because a bunch of forum users, consisting of a Senior Technician and Senior Member, feel like presenting opposition toward topics that contain even the smallest unfavorable attribute among all things. I do not mean to slander ANYONE because that is not the kind of person I am. I also do not wish to be apart of the Computing Community for reasons related directly to the kind of behavior exhibited here. I am not the kind of person who goes around MSFN looking for posts to criticize other members. Up until now, I have been shown kindness and support from this site. I would like to thank MSFN for creating a website dedicated to Microsoft. I attribute almost all of my range of abilities in Unattended Installs and Windows components to this site because it is one of the most comprehensive resources on the internet. You, the people of MSFN, have been given a great opportunity to spread information to others less informed than yourselves and to learn from others who have much experience in the field. By posting these responses on the thread, you are showing me and the entire MSFN community how superior you think you are to us. There is no more room in this world for arrogance and you are just living up to our unwanted reputation. We, the Real Computer Users, are looked upon as anti-social, conceited human beings. Why is it that everytime the topic of computers comes up, every single PC Guru has to let everyone else around know the extent of his or her knowledge. To tell you the truth, NO ONE CARES. If you have an insecurity that can only be eased through Arrogance, we, the computer users, will be doomed to fail socially for the rest of time. Stop challenging other people to knowledge battles because in the scheme of life, IT DOES NOT MATTER. We are taught from Preschool, "Love your neighbor and yourself." I know no one is perfect and I am the first to admit I am not perfect, but until we get over the Need To Impress Other People, we will always be known as "Computer Geeks." I don't know about you, but I don't want that title. I have fought my whole life to live past the reputation preceeded by so many others. I will not be a "Computer Geek" because my Love of Life Comes First. I don't care if I know more about Computers than you. I don't care if you know more about Computers than me. Life is too short. Thanks for treating me as the world treats you. -JASpurrier3
  5. LLXX, thanks for the info. I saw the other Thread and it was under the wrong category. My question has nothing to do with "Multi-Boot CD/DVDs", but thanks for the concern. The other thread is also filled with outdated posts, why add on to an already dead topic in the wrong category? Nitroshift, thanks for you concern with Warez, but I do not condone the use of warez. Either way, it doesn't matter which version of Vista I use because they all have the same data at the same offsets. The BillGates version is Pre-RTM anyway; it's like using a Beta or Release Candidate which is not warez. Anyone else have anything constructive to say about CDImage v2.52?
  6. Ok, I know there is a REAL CDImage v2.52 out on the internet somewhere. I have studied the ISOs and found out that CDImage v1.47 and OSCDIMG v1.45 are similar (almost the same). I am working with the Official MSDN (not Billgates!) release of Vista. I decompressed all of the files and then used CDImage and OSCDIMG to compress the files into a UDF iso. The ISO sizes are exactly the same, but the actual data in them is not the same. First, after making the basic changes in version and date (1.47->2.52), I compared the files and found many different changes. My Command: CDImage.exe -lLRMCFRE_EN_DVD -t11/02/2006,12:00:00 -h -u2 -o -m -betfsboot.com C:\LRMCFRE_EN_DVD LRMCFRE_EN_DVD.iso Is this correct? A few changes between the two versions: Offset: 8B875h MSDN: 6c1be000MS UDFBridge Mine: L R M C F R E _ E N _ D V D Offset: 8B919h MSDN: CDImage UDF media Mine: Sample UDF 1.50 media Offset: 8B93Dh MSDN: Contact jmaxson or arunku Mine: Contact danlo or nathann Now, searching through the rest of the ISOs, all of the files contained within are "marked" at the same offsets, but minor byte strings all around are changed (around 4000). I was wondering if this could be due to the version of the UDF (current version in CDImage is 1.50, other programs go up to 2.6) or just due to little "hashes" that makes each version of CDImage unique. I also tried compressing the same group of files a second time with all of the same settings and the ISO had the exact same MD5. So, time does not affect the actual makeup of the ISO. Is there anyone with some suggestions? My goal is to harness the ability to compress the group of Vista files myself and still have the same MD5 on the ISO as the original.
  7. OK, here is my problem. I have decompressed ALL of the Windows XP SP2 INF files. I have removed them according to what I want to keep. In a nut shell, I have kept 240 files from the 809 files. They are basically the settings INFs like accessor.inf, all of the services, and All of the generic drivers. This process took me about 4 hours because I looked through every inf file. I would like to know the best way to go through all of the removed inf files and remove their corresponding drivers from Driver.cab. I am trying to write a program in C# to automate this process, but I am having trouble finding all of the files inside of the INFs. I am willing to spend time on this, I would just like to know the most efficient and secure way to remove all unneeded drivers with no left over files. When I install Windows, I manually install and update every driver myself so I have no need for the drivers. I would also like to know if anyone has a CORE file list with the inf files and the files in Driver.cab that are not drivers. I would like to keep all components, services, and settings the same. Does the file corelist.inf have anything to do with safemode? I would greatly appreciate any help I can get on this. I am a perfectionist and I would like to remove all of the file without the use of nLite. I have used nLite, but I prefer to do this myself and without all of the nLite customizations. Thanks again, Joe
  8. OK, here is my problem. I have decompressed ALL of the Windows XP SP2 INF files. I have removed them according to what I want to keep. In a nut shell, I have kept 240 files from the 809 files. They are basically the settings INFs like accessor.inf, all of the services, and All of the generic drivers. This process took me about 4 hours because I looked through every inf file. I would like to know the best way to go through all of the removed inf files and remove their corresponding drivers from Driver.cab. I am trying to write a program in C# to automate this process, but I am having trouble finding all of the files inside of the INFs. I am willing to spend time on this, I would just like to know the most efficient and secure way to remove all unneeded drivers with no left over files. When I install Windows, I manually install and update every driver myself so I have no need for the drivers. I would also like to know if anyone has a CORE file list with the inf files and the files in Driver.cab that are not drivers. I would like to keep all components, services, and settings the same. Does the file corelist.inf have anything to do with safemode? I would greatly appreciate any help I can get on this. I am a perfectionist and I would like to remove all of the file without the use of nLite. I have used nLite, but I prefer to do this myself and without all of the nLite customizations. Thanks again, Joe
  9. My suggestion is to back up all of the drivers yourself. The last time I used a program to do it, most of the drivers were corrupt because the program didn't copy every file (like the exes). I would: 1. Update all drivers. 2. Save the lastest drivers you just installed. 3. Nlite the crap out of the drivers on your Windows XP CD. Once you have all of the drivers saved, in theory, you should be able to remove all of the drivers NOT IN RED with Nlite. I believe this is the best way for your driver removal. -Joe
  10. Come on, you guys aren't helping much. 800mhz is fine for Windows XP (I just disabled all the Visual Effects in the System Properties to improve overall performance). I personally don't like Media Center because it is too many things I don't need. The only HUGE difference I see is that you need a stronger PC so you can use the wireless remote to change songs (more visual changes than weaker computers have trouble handling). Windows Media Center is actually 2 disks. The first disc is Windows XP Pro with SP2 (accepts XP and media center keys) and the second disc has a CAB that includes Media Center files to upgrade Windows XP Pro if you enter in a Media Center key during installation (pretty smart). Don't worry about SP2 giving you problems. The only real problems occur when installing SP2 separately from Windows XP because previously installed programs mess with the installation. If you get Windows XP with SP2 already integrated, you're fine. SP2 is great. It includes a popup blocker in internet explorer (the best feature) and a Wireless Networking Wizard that manages your networks. It also adds some other security features like improved automatic updates and a great firewall. Internet explorer also has a 3rd-party Add-ons manager that allows you to monitor all plugins that are installed so you can easily detect and disable spyware. I prefer Windows XP Pro over Home because it has better security from a Network point of view. Get the Upgrade Version because it is the exact same thing as the Full Version. The only difference is you will be required to pop in the Windows 98 cd at installation to prove you own Windows Software. Other than that, there is no difference. You can still do a full installation with the Upgrade Version (which I recommend). I used to run XP on an 866 HP. I only experienced problems, as travisowens said, from the ram bottleneck. Get 256 or 512 and you will be fine. Processor is no big deal. Just remember that Windows XP registers your CD Key with your individual PC and sends it to Microsoft so it is a pain to install XP on more than one system. Windows XP Pro Corporate overcomes the need to register with microsoft (I use this method, but it is very expensive). Good Luck, hope this helps. Windows XP is great by the way. -JASpurrier3
  11. WinPatrol Plus: "EHCI Support – S4TSR.EXE S4tsr.exe will appear in your Windows folder. You may see it described as DisableEHCI. The Enhanced Host Controller Interface (EHCI) specification describes the register-level interface for a Host Controller for the Universal Serial Bus (USB) Revision 2.0. This does exactly what it sounds like it does. It disables EHCI support (generally relating to TSR-S4 point to point wireless communications). More information about EHCI and how it works can be found at http://www.intel.com/technology/usb/ehcispec.htm. If you decide that you really want to get rid of this file, try temporarily disabling it via WinPatrol then test your wireless devices to see if you've lost functionality." SOURCE: HERE
  12. Yeah, Nuhi and nLite are great, but not really my style. I am a perfectionist and I like to do things myself. -JASpurrier3
  13. Why can't Windows Text Setup be changed from Blue? I have searched around and all I found what that Winnt.exe was "rehashed" or "obfusticated". What do these terms mean, it there anyway possible to change the blue color? I am really interested. Thanks for your input. -JASpurrier3
  14. Does anyone know which file controls the color of the Blue Sreen of Death? I can't seem to find it through searching because so many are just error topics with the Blue Screen? I have also heard that Vista has a red screen of death. Is this true? If it is, do you know what file it is based in? Thanks for your input. -JASpurrier3
  15. You need to replace the file ntoskrnl.exe in the SP2.cab on the i386 folder. -JASpurrier3