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Create My Own Recovery Partition?

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#26
trinitegq

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Does anyone know how the f12 key on a dell pc w/vista works. It doesn't seem to be dependant on MBR or for that matter anything on the drive. I changed the OEM drive and I still can bring that function up. It doesn' work thought, but the menu is there. I wonder how to modify it.


It's in BIOS, nothing much you can do about it, unless you want to start fiddling with BIOS, NOT, and I mean NOT recommended, you could end up with an unbootable system and need even a replacement BIOS !

jaclaz


No this information is stored in the Master Boot Record, not the BIOS. I am in process of duplicating this issue as well, but I can't really tell you much about it because of IP reasons. However volume imaging solutions (such as Ghost and Acronis) save the MBR in the image, but Imagex being file based does not. Anyways, this is also part of the reason why the OPK documentation (as well as WAIK) say that "recovery" aka EFI partitions must be the first partition on the drive. Dell, however, doesn't use WinRE for it's recovery partition, which is why it isn't Part 1 on the drive...

Dell doesn't use winRE?! what is it then? winPE?


Dell uses another company's product to create their recovery partition. This company creates custom recovery options to make it look natural to the OEM that sells/distributes the computer. Because my company and the recovery provider are clients, I cannot divulge additional information, sorry.

BTW. do you know what the difference is between an extended winRE installation vs a wim installation?


A WIM installation, at its simplest, is a partition you can boot to that may have a simple interface, that basically applies the WIM to your C drive. Which is basically what the Dell Recovery partition does but it asks you stuff to make sure you want to do it, etc.

cool. thanks for the info!


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#27
jaclaz

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For the record, it seems like the MBR Utility (Freeware from Terabyte):
http://www.terabyteu...ee-software.htm
http://www.terabyteu...wnloads/mbr.zip

Has, between others, an option to install a MBR using F12 (or other Fn key) to access a recovery partition and one to install a MBR using Fn key to access a recovery partition and change it's type:

....

/INSTALL Install MBR code using the follow addtional parameters:

[STD] [SEL to fkey "msg"] [SELM to fkey "msg" fsid fsidhid]

STD Install standard MBR code.
SEL Install MBR code that will display 'msg' and boot a hidden
FAT/FAT32 partition if 'fkey' is pressed within 'to' seconds.
The ondisk MBR is not modified.
SELM Install MBR code that will display 'msg' and boot a partition
with a file system id of 'fsidhid' if 'fkey' is pressed within
'to' seconds. The MBR is modifed so that the partition is marked
active and the file system is changed to 'fsid'. To reset the
MBR back to the prior settings, use the /RESET switch before
modifying the MBR again.
....

mbr 0 /install std

MBR.EXE will install a standard MBR to hard drive 0.

mbr 0 /install sel 5 12 "Press F12 to boot the recovery partition"

MBR.EXE will install a MBR to hard drive 0. The MBR will display the
message "Press F12 to boot the recovery partition" for 5 seconds, and
the F12 key will cause a hidden FAT/FAT32 to be selected for booting.

mbr 0 /install selm 10 9 "Press F9 for recovery" 0xC 0xDB

MBR.EXE will install a MBR to hard drive 0. The MBR will display the
message "Press F9 to boot the recovery partition" for 10 seconds.

If the F9 key is pressed within 10 seconds, it will cause a partition
with the file system ID 0xDB to be booted from. The MBR will then be
modified to mark the new boot partition active, and the file system ID
of it will be changed to 0xC.

Once booted in the partition whose file system ID was originally 0xDB,
the command line "mbr 0 /reset" should be run, in order to set the MBR
back to the state it was in before the file system ID and active
partition values were changed.


:)

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 02 June 2008 - 07:53 AM.


#28
trinitegq

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For the record, it seems like the MBR Utility (Freeware from Terabyte):
http://www.terabyteu...ee-software.htm
http://www.terabyteu...wnloads/mbr.zip

Has, between others, an option to install a MBR using F12 (or other Fn key) to access a recovery partition and one to install a MBR using Fn key to access a recovery partition and change it's type:

....

/INSTALL Install MBR code using the follow addtional parameters:


...
Once booted in the partition whose file system ID was originally 0xDB,
the command line "mbr 0 /reset" should be run, in order to set the MBR
back to the state it was in before the file system ID and active
partition values were changed.


:)

jaclaz


jaclaz, this is excellent news. Thanks for the info I'm sure it will come handy to many people. I know I will definitely need it!
Great catch!

#29
Tripredacus

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This program did indeed give the ability to get a keystroke from the user while displaying information on the screen. However it would not boot the recovery partition I use. It is a hidden, no drive letter 0x12 partition that IS bootable. Except when I press F10 (instead of F12) it tried to boot off the network. I disabled network boot in the BIOS and it will then say "No Bootable Device"...

So it seems that the MBR.EXE is looking for a different type of hidden partition than the one I am using.
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#30
jaclaz

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A non-hidden 12 partition becomes a visible 02 one.

How is it really formatted?

You might want to try the "selm" parameter. :unsure:

jaclaz

#31
Tripredacus

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A non-hidden 12 partition becomes a visible 02 one.

How is it really formatted?

You might want to try the "selm" parameter. :unsure:

jaclaz


It is formatted FAT32, and appears as a EISA partition in Disk Administrator, without a drive letter.

I also tried the other application on that site, MBRWORK, which appeared (at first) to be a hopeful fix. My test computer (where I am doing the MBR work) is a clone of computers that we currently image daily. So I have ready access to production units. I captured the MBR off one of the working production units, and then applied it to my test computer. It went through without error, and displays the appropriate information on the screen during boot-up. However, it did not respond to the "R" key and the "F10" key did not seem to work any better than before.
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#32
trinitegq

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Success! (well, half)

I was finally able to install winRE and have it bootable from the F8 menu. ("Recover your computer")

The problem seems to have been the "hidden" Dell partition (type DE) which is the Dell Uitlity that I wanted to have also on my drive. It seems that SetAutoFailOver.cmd doesn't recogonize it and thus when running the script I was indicating that winRE is installed on the 2nd partition. The script always ran successfully, however it never worked when booting from the F8 menu.

So when I decided to run winRE (wim install) from "C:" drive and simply run the script as:

setautofailover.cmd /target c: /wim /nohide <enter> it worked.

The winre.wim is sort of unpacked in memory. Also it's not a good idea to have the recovery option running on the same drive (partition) you're planning to repair.

I tried installing winre via imagex on E: and run the script as:

setautofailover.cmd /target e: /nohide <enter> - it worked!

The problem. Since I wanted to have four partition:

Dell Utility (DE) - 50MB - Hidden
RECOVERY (07h) - 10GB
OS_Install (07h) - 50GB
Data (07h) - 690GB

I always ran the script as:

setautofailover.cmd /target e: /partition 2 /nohide <enter>

It never worked as it wouldn't see the DE partition and thus it wouldn't count it. So it was trying to boot from the OS partition. Of course it wouldn't work.

This is for the benefit of anyone looking to do this, the only thing to keep in mind is to have the RECOVERY partiton (winRE) installed before the OS partition and keep in mind that any hidden partitions before the RECOVERY partition are apparently ignored.

For full instructions go:


= Windows recovery environment --> HERE (Recommended)
- Windows RE notes blog --> HERE
- Windows PE Walkthroughs --> HERE
- Inside the Dell Utility Partition --> HERE

My problem now is that I do have the Dell recovery files* (thanks redjoy!), however while PCrestore.exe shows up on the WinRE recovery menu (as Dell factory image install) when chosen nothings happens. Even if I run it via the DOS command, it won't run. I does run from windows however. If anyone has any idea as to why this could be please let me know. I think that the PCrestore.exe program has some sort of signature to the hard drive or the PC that it was initially installed in and if it doesn't match it won't do anything when ran. For now I'm happy!


*Files where compared and found to be correct and the exact same size as well as the supporting files from another source. The files are located in the "tools" folder of a Dell machine with Vista installed in the Recovery partition. Also, the winreconfig.xml found in the "sources/recovery/tools" folder was exactly the same.

Thanks redjoy for all your help!

#33
pretender69

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Success! (well, half)

I was finally able to install winRE and have it bootable from the F8 menu. ("Recover your computer")

The problem seems to have been the "hidden" Dell partition (type DE) which is the Dell Uitlity that I wanted to have also on my drive. It seems that SetAutoFailOver.cmd doesn't recogonize it and thus when running the script I was indicating that winRE is installed on the 2nd partition. The script always ran successfully, however it never worked when booting from the F8 menu.

So when I decided to run winRE (wim install) from "C:" drive and simply run the script as:

setautofailover.cmd /target c: /wim /nohide <enter> it worked.

The winre.wim is sort of unpacked in memory. Also it's not a good idea to have the recovery option running on the same drive (partition) you're planning to repair.

I tried installing winre via imagex on E: and run the script as:

setautofailover.cmd /target e: /nohide <enter> - it worked!

The problem. Since I wanted to have four partition:

Dell Utility (DE) - 50MB - Hidden
RECOVERY (07h) - 10GB
OS_Install (07h) - 50GB
Data (07h) - 690GB

I always ran the script as:

setautofailover.cmd /target e: /partition 2 /nohide <enter>

It never worked as it wouldn't see the DE partition and thus it wouldn't count it. So it was trying to boot from the OS partition. Of course it wouldn't work.

This is for the benefit of anyone looking to do this, the only thing to keep in mind is to have the RECOVERY partiton (winRE) installed before the OS partition and keep in mind that any hidden partitions before the RECOVERY partition are apparently ignored.

For full instructions go:


= Windows recovery environment --> HERE (Recommended)
- Windows RE notes blog --> HERE
- Windows PE Walkthroughs --> HERE
- Inside the Dell Utility Partition --> HERE

My problem now is that I do have the Dell recovery files* (thanks redjoy!), however while PCrestore.exe shows up on the WinRE recovery menu (as Dell factory image install) when chosen nothings happens. Even if I run it via the DOS command, it won't run. I does run from windows however. If anyone has any idea as to why this could be please let me know. I think that the PCrestore.exe program has some sort of signature to the hard drive or the PC that it was initially installed in and if it doesn't match it won't do anything when ran. For now I'm happy!


*Files where compared and found to be correct and the exact same size as well as the supporting files from another source. The files are located in the "tools" folder of a Dell machine with Vista installed in the Recovery partition. Also, the winreconfig.xml found in the "sources/recovery/tools" folder was exactly the same.

Thanks redjoy for all your help!



Only thing i've noticed that the PCRestore.exe file looks for is a Factory.wim located in the \dell\image dir.

#34
trinitegq

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Success! (well, half)

I was finally able to install winRE and have it bootable from the F8 menu. ("Recover your computer")...

My problem now is that I do have the Dell recovery files* (thanks redjoy!), however while PCrestore.exe shows up on the WinRE recovery menu (as Dell factory image install) when chosen nothings happens. Even if I run it via the DOS command, it won't run. I does run from windows however. If anyone has any idea as to why this could be please let me know. I think that the PCrestore.exe program has some sort of signature to the hard drive or the PC that it was initially installed in and if it doesn't match it won't do anything when ran.
...



Only thing i've noticed that the PCRestore.exe file looks for is a Factory.wim located in the \dell\image dir.


yeah, I noticed that when I ran PCrestore.exe (from windows) and it said that factory.wim was missing. I put it then on the dell/image dir and ran it again. This time it ran properly and went ahead and asked me if I wanted to install it and it'd reformat c:, bla bla.... I didn't do it of course.
However, when run from the winre environment, clicking on the menu for the Dell option or running PCrestore.exe from command doesn't do anything at all.

Any other ideas guys?

#35
trinitegq

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oops

Edited by trinitegq, 09 June 2008 - 02:35 PM.


#36
deploymentgeek

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Hi Guys

I know this is a old thread, would you like you to know that we have developed a complete, pre-installation and recovery system, including backup etc.

If you would like to know more, please let me know

Best Regards

Rico Raja

#37
jaclaz

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deploymentgeek

You may want to read Rules, expecially #4:
http://www.msfn.org/...ead-t18408.html

And you might want, anyway, to check the spelling on your site, I would never buy anything from people that write "Avaible" instead of "Available". :whistle:

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 03 July 2008 - 09:49 AM.


#38
andrewwan1980

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This is a good project. The factory partition setup from most vendors (Dell, HP) have 1 recovery partition and 1 large main os partition. It's not good enough if the recovery will wipe the main os partition. It would be good to follow good ol' UNIX methodology and have a seperate partition for user data. Dell/HP doesn't make repartitioning any easier... with the consequences of losing the Dell Utility, Dell MediaDirect partitions and Dell's special MBR F8 code.

If Dell has taken steps of giving us recovery CDs, then they should also give us recovery MBR, recovery partition tables... added bonus of letting us configure our partitions in the first place.

#39
dexter.inside

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You are forgetting that most users don't even grasp the notion of 'recovery' for their OS

#40
Corn~Julio

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I dont know if this will work with Vista but i do intend to find out as i just got it, but it does work with XP and have been doing something similar w/variations since 311

I have 3 drives C,D,E. C is Obvious, D is personal storage i.e. games music porn (lol) and E is for recovery,since dos isn't an option i have installed XP on E to initiate a gui unattended to C using winnt32.exe, I use bat's w/alcls, del & deltree (yes it works) to delete all but the ntldr, ntdetect and the boot.ini, not exactly formatting the drive but I've had no trouble

I have chosen leave many files on the E for my unattended and use cmdlines.txt to point there as to reduce the amount of files to be copied and increase the installation speed, this also serves well when tweaking the UA as you save on CD\DVD

Its not as flashy as Dell or others, its not VMware, its unconventional, but it is simple, and it is essentially the same concept, I know its not the answer to your question, but it might be an alterntive

#41
andrewwan1980

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Has anyone got further in this "Create Your Own Dell Recovery Partition" project?

For anyone wishing to retrieve Dell's F8 Repair Computer option, then follow the instructions using setautofailover.cmd (WAIK tool) from http://www.svrops.co.../winvistare.htm - If you messed up your MBR then you can use Vista's CD Repair feature and use bootrec fixmbr & fixboot (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927392). Dell uses everything Microsoft to create their Vista Recovery route (previously used Ghost, etc).

setautofailover /target d: /partition 2
usually works for me. Don't use /wim since Dell's RECOVERY partition has a non-WIM Recovery Environment... but their factory restore image is WIM. Their non-WIM RE will automatically run to restore factory.wim into the last visible partition. So if your last visible partition is DATA.. and not OS... then it's going to get overriden. To avoid this, you'll need to use ptedit.exe and hide your DATA partition... so that your OS partition is the last visible partition.

Currently am building up my own factory.wim and going to replace Dell's factory.wim file. Lucky I made a backup image of the RECOVERY partition so I can play about with it on the laptop.


Other ideas is to use BartPE... and Drive Image XML. BartPE can be installed in the RECOVERY partition clean... and Drive Image XML of the OS partition (or use your favourate hard drive image program).

#42
mastrboy

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i have currently created something very similear, but it's linux based and use partimage for imaging.. currently stuck on modifying grub a little to display a message like: "press esc for recovery" or something...

#43
smartie91

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Hi

i use acronis trueimage with a recovery partition on my c drive on boot up if i want to relaod windows i press f11 which then starts acronis recovery system

hope this helps

smartie91
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#44
andrewwan1980

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Hi

i use acronis trueimage with a recovery partition on my c drive on boot up if i want to relaod windows i press f11 which then starts acronis recovery system

hope this helps

smartie91


smartie91, can you tell me more about Acronis TrueImage Recovery System? I know about Acronis TrueImage from a NORMAL windows application that you install and use within Windows XP (last time I used). I remember about Acronis bootable CD... but never could get working. You say you have a Acronis Recovery System in a recovery partition similar to Dell's? How did you set this up? I guess one could copy the bootable CD to that recovery partition yeah.

#45
dexter.inside

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Hi

i use acronis trueimage with a recovery partition on my c drive on boot up if i want to relaod windows i press f11 which then starts acronis recovery system

hope this helps

smartie91


Yes, Acronis does have a backup/recovery system using a hidden partition. Instead of making a .tib file, it saves the contents of a partition as raw data on that hidden acronis partition. No big deal, and is quite useful for laptops.

#46
smartie91

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Hi
Andrewwan1980

hope this helps even better is when you have your image you can update the image with new updates or whatever it will then only update the files which have changed when you have it loaded into windows you can make a bootable cd so you can then use it one other pc without haveing to install it first


Acronis Recovery Manager enables you to restart your computer by hitting the F11 key when you see the "press F11 for acronis recovery manager" message, in case you computer does not boot correctly, even if your operating system has been deleted. Before activating Acronis Recovery Manger, you need to create Acronis Secure Zone first. ( Note: If Acronis Secure Zone can not be found in hard disc, this function will not be available )


Acronis true image is an excellent data backup tool, which allows you to create Acronis secure zone. The secure zone is very safe and inaccessible by ordinary windows program and can not be corrupted by computer virus and system crash etc. when you encounter system crash. If your computer can not be started normally, you can start with acronis true image while Acronis secure zone must be created before.

Then how to create acronis secure zone? Follow steps list below, you can easily create acronis secure zone.
1. Download acronis true image by visiting http://www.downloada...e/download.html
2. Install acronis true image to your PC.
3. Run acronis true image by click start => program =>acronis => acronis true image
4. Click manage secure zone in the key function zone. Then acronis secure zone wizard will pop up.
5. In acronis secure zone wizard window, click “next” to other step.
6. Then choose a disc to create acronis secure zone. And specify the size of secure zone. Then click next
7. Then another window will pop up, click “proceed” to create acronis secure zone.
After finishing creating, you need to restart your PC to make acronis secure zone effect.


For more information, please visit http://www.downloada...nis-true-image/

Edited by smartie91, 14 July 2008 - 01:13 AM.

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#47
Rcrash

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I just went through this entire process, here's what I did:

http://graphopho.be/?p=38

With my new Dell XPS1530, there came a recovery partition.

This was fantastic, as on first boot Vista decided to blue screen. How thoroughly annoying, and did nothing to change my prior opinion of Vista. So after running the recovery deal, I was greeted with a factory fresh install and a completely working system, in about 20 minutes, vs the 2 hour install that Vista usually offers.

After about a month and a half of using Vista, the majority of my past rant stands, but after overcoming many of the annoyances with run shortcuts (ncpa.cpl), and figuring out some of the other stupids about it, I’ve come to not despise the OS. With Cygwin and andLinux running on it, it runs essentially how I want it to.

So good, working system, no odd crashes, no stupid anything going on, just a nice clean working system, with all kinds of nice things going on. So why would I need a basic factory install any more? Answer: I wouldn’t. So I want to update the restore partition to reflect the current system, with all the nice things that I have set up and blah blah blah.

So should be a relatively simple process no? Well, turns out, no.

The issues thus far:

1. The rescue partition is 10GB and at the beginning of the drive, and is too small to take a full image of my current system, which measures in at around 18GB with all programs, but all inconsequential data stripped.
2. Dell provides no way to replace the image, or create a second image
3. The Windows tools to do it are rather cumbersome and according to the few forum posts I’ve read, largely capable of f***ing up the whole rescue partition tool deal.
4. If I do manage to f*** up the disk, Dell provides no way to restore the rescue partition, so I’m stuck installing all over from scratch, not a big deal, but if I’m going to be there, I might as well leave the image as it is.
5. Vista’s install size increase exponentially with each pre-vista app you install. That is, there’s a huge whack of data that gets put in %windir%\winsxs for each program, something akin to a backup of every single system file for compatability, more info HERE and HERE, for me this directory is just under 8GB, 8,515,358,720 bytes to be exact, and makes up 2/3rds of my %windir%. This is common. This ensures that there’s no f***ing way I can create an image of my Windows install, let alone my whole C:\ drive with all programs.
6. There’s really no concrete How To, anywhere that I’ve found.

So what I want to accomplish:

1. Create an image of my computer right now that I can restore to after I inevitably destroy my Windows install.
2. Keep the original image in case there’s some irrecoverable f***up that I haven’t come across in THIS install.
3. Keep all Dell restore tools up and running properly.

Where I’m at so far:

1. Freed up 20GB of space, killed the Dell Media Direct partition, and chomped 20GB off of the end of my C: drive.
2. Ran Partition Manager to move the Windows dir up 20GB and reassign the free space to the rescue partition.
This was stopped by an error in my directory tree which was supposed to be fixed by chkdsk. Booted up to run chkdsk, found out that I’d somehow fallen prey to the “chkdsk will not run on boot” errror in Vista. Thought I’d fixed that, and then came into a blue screen related to my video card. Looked that up, fixed that through system restore, and updated my nVidia drivers.
3. Reinstall Partition Manager, try again.
4. Same results
5. Give up on doing it that way, decide I’m being a bit too stuck on one way and read a lot about WAIK, and realise that what I need to do is all wrapped up in a bunch of advanced Microsoft hooey. Download and install that, then follow THIS article and create a bootable Windows Pre-install Edition CD. Then follow THIS article to image my system, and save that to the partition space I’ve previously allotted.Which it turns out is overkill. My 18.6GB Windows install, with all programs and most stuff already logged in, saved, bookmarked, and relatively complete aside from a few minor missing programs and log ins, created only a 5.6GB image while using /compress fast while creating the image.The entire imaging process took about an hour on a Intel CoreDuo 1.8 with 3GB of RAM, and the 160GB 5400 hdd. After completing this process on my real computer (once I get my hdd replaced) I’ll be writing an entirely new article following this same process but without the initial recovery partition, which you’ll soon see is a different beast.
6. I then read a bunch of other articles that didn’t really tell me much, and I think just made me think that this was all going to be a whole lot more confusing than it should be, or than it actually was.

What I ended up doing after creating the image was, to make a long story short, Keep It Simple Stupid. I just moved the new image to my original partition, moved the real Factory.wim (the Dell factory image) to the root of the partition and then move my image to [recovery drive (for me D)]:\Dell\Image\ and rename it Factory.wim.

The moment of truth came, and I restored that image, and was pleasantly surprised that there wer no weird f***ups, like hashes failing or “mismatched image file” or some such. It just took my new image, applied it, and done.

Now, that’s easy, however I’ve got no idea how to create a WinRE from scratch that will actually work like I want it to, but I figure that with all those articles I’ve read I should be able to cobble one together.

As it stands, my D:\ drive has the factory image in its root, and my recovery image in the re-imaging folder. Should I find that my install is somehow hopelessly broken, I’ll log into the WinRE and open a cmd window and move the original image to the image directory and start from scratch. So no harm, no foul.

#48
maxXPsoft

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Btw on Acronis True Image
If your drive gets messed up where secure zone won't start with F11. Surely you did that one extra step and created a boot CD where it will start the PC and restore entire drive/partition. Acronis can also create incremental backups in the secure zone/removeable drive or even to dvd.

Best recovery ever made.

Edited by maxXPsoft, 05 August 2008 - 06:53 AM.

Download ++> Windows 7 + 8 Unattended DVD + App Installer + Services Disabler + Load All Button + XML Creator
Jump2Reg - Registry: - Oct 4, 2013 - Version 3.0.4 - 98, ME, NT, 2K, XP, VISTA, Seven, Windows 8+ and 32 or 64 bit

XP Unattended CD/DVD creator - Version 4.1.7
Sample xml + Setupcomplete + Add Right click .wim Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1

#49
pedrohp

pedrohp
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  • Joined 09-August 08

Has anyone got further in this "Create Your Own Dell Recovery Partition" project?

For anyone wishing to retrieve Dell's F8 Repair Computer option, then follow the instructions using setautofailover.cmd (WAIK tool) from http://www.svrops.co.../winvistare.htm - If you messed up your MBR then you can use Vista's CD Repair feature and use bootrec fixmbr & fixboot (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927392). Dell uses everything Microsoft to create their Vista Recovery route (previously used Ghost, etc).

setautofailover /target d: /partition 2
usually works for me. Don't use /wim since Dell's RECOVERY partition has a non-WIM Recovery Environment... but their factory restore image is WIM. Their non-WIM RE will automatically run to restore factory.wim into the last visible partition. So if your last visible partition is DATA.. and not OS... then it's going to get overriden. To avoid this, you'll need to use ptedit.exe and hide your DATA partition... so that your OS partition is the last visible partition.

Currently am building up my own factory.wim and going to replace Dell's factory.wim file. Lucky I made a backup image of the RECOVERY partition so I can play about with it on the laptop.


Other ideas is to use BartPE... and Drive Image XML. BartPE can be installed in the RECOVERY partition clean... and Drive Image XML of the OS partition (or use your favourate hard drive image program).


Hi there!

I'm pretty new to this dell problem, but i have already read a lot and i DO want to retrive Dell's F8 Repair Computer option. Witch steps should i fallow from this guide you pointed? All?

I tried to simply run "setautofailover /target d: /partition 3" (diskpart shows RECOVERY - D: partition as partition 3) and the recovery option does appear on the F8 menu, but boots to a vista login screen that asks for BOTH login and password, witch i do not have!

Please help me! i really need the DSR working again!

#50
Arhilladus

Arhilladus
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  • 2 posts
  • Joined 24-July 09

yeah, I noticed that when I ran PCrestore.exe (from windows) and it said that factory.wim was missing. I put it then on the dell/image dir and ran it again. This time it ran properly and went ahead and asked me if I wanted to install it and it'd reformat c:, bla bla.... I didn't do it of course.
However, when run from the winre environment, clicking on the menu for the Dell option or running PCrestore.exe from command doesn't do anything at all.

Any other ideas guys?

It is most likely a mismatch between a 64-bit WinRE version and 32-bit PCRestore.exe or vice versa, I read and followed all the instructions in this thread and found the same problem, I am now in need of a 64-bit version of the Dell PCRestore.exe file. I'll be deeply grateful to the user who can share his copy of the file. :)

Edited by Arhilladus, 25 July 2009 - 11:49 AM.





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