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Restoring a system back up to a different HDD

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#1
LordFett

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I have a computer I basically use as network storage, but the system drive is only 20gb and since I have a spare 100gb I'd like to use that one without having to reinstall everything. I did a back up of the system drive and restored it onto the new system drive. The first time I got an error for a bad file, forget the name of it, but it wouldn't boot. So I did a new back up and restore this time as soon as it passes bios i just get a cursor.

Neither time would my winxp reconize that there was an istallation of windows on the new system hdd. Is there a way I can check the backup before I do a restore? Would it be better if i removed the old system disk and did a backup with it as a non-system disk on another computer?

I've looked at norton ghost, but I've never been a fan of their and shelling out 70 bones for this isn't something I want to do right now. I'm not looking for something 100%, if there is a good program that will help me with this I'll gladly purchase it... but not for $70.
"The difference between myself and a mad man, is I am not mad" Salvadore Dali 1904-1989


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#2
IcemanND

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Here is a list of disk imaging software some free some not that should all be able to do what you want.
http://www.msfn.org/...re-t100299.html

Or there is a guide on creating a WIM of XP for deployment here:
http://www.msfn.org/...-X-t101383.html

#3
Ponch

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The first time I got an error for a bad file, forget the name of it, but it wouldn't boot. So I did a new back up and restore this time as soon as it passes bios i just get a cursor.

You are probably copying a second partition on a 1st partition or you end up with two or no active partition or something like that.

#4
JedMeister

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Yeah just do an image like suggested by IcemanND. Thats the easiest way to go.
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#5
CharlotteTheHarlot

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I have a computer I basically use as network storage, but the system drive is only 20gb and since I have a spare 100gb I'd like to use that one without having to reinstall everything. I did a back up of the system drive and restored it onto the new system drive. The first time I got an error for a bad file, forget the name of it, but it wouldn't boot. So I did a new back up and restore this time as soon as it passes bios i just get a cursor.

Neither time would my winxp reconize that there was an istallation of windows on the new system hdd. Is there a way I can check the backup before I do a restore? Would it be better if i removed the old system disk and did a backup with it as a non-system disk on another computer?

I've looked at norton ghost, but I've never been a fan of their and shelling out 70 bones for this isn't something I want to do right now. I'm not looking for something 100%, if there is a good program that will help me with this I'll gladly purchase it... but not for $70.


Yeah, doing a backup/restore is just one step above dragging files/folders in Explorer. Never gonna work.

If you are replacing a 20 GB WinXP system drive with a 100 (which will then be the system drive) ... and ... either of the two disks is a Seagate or Maxtor, there is a free and foolproof solution which I have used many times. On this page at Seagate you can download their DiscWizard. The current URL is showing as:

http://www.seagate.c...000f5ee0a0aRCRD (English, but others are there). apprx 109 MB Windows setup.

What you do is install the program in Windows and then burn the bootable CD (for some strange reason they do not just have the ISO sitting there on the website). You can then uninstall the Windows program (see later). The bootable CD supplies its own OS as this cloning chore is done far outside of Windows. In the BIOS, enable CD/DVD booting and make it 1st in the sequence. NOTE: if you have bought a Seagate retail in the past year or so (not OEM), you already have the bootable CD.

It is actually an Acronis Imaging program. The main choice is Cloning, which can be of any flavor (smaller disk to larger, vice versa, same to same). You can manually configure any destination partition sizes (very similar to the method in Gparted's 'gui'). Acronis does all the dirty work of flagging the drive as active/bootable/etc (whatever the source drive was) and preserves any naughty tricks that Microsoft has built into NTFS which WinXP may look at to decide if all is kosher.

I have personally done just about every permutation of disk size to disk size, enlarging-reducing-removing partitions as well. This includes varieties of disk types SATA/PATA/USB and brands Seagate/IBM/Maxtor/Samsung/WD. But one drive needs to be Seagate/Maxtor. If there are no Seagate/Maxtors in your system, see if Western Digital has software that works the same way. But if you're like me, you have stacks of disk drives around and it is easy to stick a Seagate in the middle of two steps. Hint: Samsung_to_Seagate then Seagate_to_IBM (or whatever).

So, theoretically this software is all you'll ever need. I doubt this is what they intended, but it sure is worth buying a spare Seagate to keep handy so no matter what drives a client has, cloning is at most a 2-step operation. Honestly, for Seagate to contract Acronis and get this awesome program was smart of them and just great for us. I had one of the PC-AT Seagates that although it worked for me, failures screwed them for years and years (someone actually collected these drives and dumped them in the ocean :lol: ). Wouldn't touch them on purpose for years until the early 90's. Later, the software that Seagate and Maxtor and WD used from OnTrack was dangerous (with potential Disk Manager overlays). Now all is good. Oh yeah, two other things:

(1) It sucks that you need to install the Windows program to burn the CD. In my mind, Cloning means NOT altering a single bit on the HDD, just duplicating it exactly. That Windows app (mostly BartPE and other stuff) is only needed to burn the disc. But you can do that on any computer (and therefore not have to 'mark up' your system disk). Once you have the CD, future cloning is for lack of a better word, 'clean'.

(2) In the Win application that you install, there is one item that gives the appearance that cloning can be done right there in Windows. It practically duplicates the GUI of the bootup CD. I tried this once, you wind up rebooting and the operations get carried out in a pseudo-DOSmode. This implies an MBR overlay and code injection (e.g. System Commander style) at least for the duration of the cloning operation. Me no like.

So just burn the CD on some other machine and uninstall it. There is a useful DiscWizard PDF right here.

Have Fun.

Edited by CharlotteTheHarlot, 22 May 2008 - 08:15 AM.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#6
LordFett

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Thanks for all the info everyone, I tried a couple of the programs on your list Iceman, no dice. But with one WinXP setup reconized the installation and attempted to repair it, to no avail. I am running a defrag on the disk now then I will try the seagate discwizard since both discs are maxtors. Thanks Charolotte, hopfully it will get me from here to eternity.
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#7
dandnsmith

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In case that doesn't do the trick, I moved to another system disk (twice for two different PCs recently) using Paragon Partition Manager - copy the partition(s) allowing to expand (as it wants, or controlled by you), and then ensure that the (correct) partition is marked as bootable before switching to the new HDD.
Derek

#8
LordFett

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Installed windows on the new drive then did a windows restore then used the winxp disk to repair. once it booted up I ran into a slight problem... The computer sees the drive with it's old letter... I:\
"The difference between myself and a mad man, is I am not mad" Salvadore Dali 1904-1989

#9
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Installed windows on the new drive then did a windows restore then used the winxp disk to repair. once it booted up I ran into a slight problem... The computer sees the drive with it's old letter... I:\


After I re-read my previous post I felt it needed some detail. Just to clarify, when Cloning there is no backup/restore, no setup/install of Windows, no repair or console maintenance and no Fdisk/Format. It makes no difference if a brand spanking new unformatted drive or a well used full to the brim old one will be the destination disk. The only thing I do prior to cloning is make sure that the Windows is operating soundly. Even this is is optional, a common scenario is when you have a sick/broken/infected Windows and want to operate on/with a backup.

With the DiscWizard CD in hand the steps are:

1) Restart, enter the BIOS. Now is a good time to insert the CD (no AutoRun now) it will be used on the next reboot. Here in the BIOS enable CD/DVD bootup and also make it 1st in sequence. SAVE changes and Exit. Some BIOS have a shutdown choice, if so use it! Otherwise be fast and ...

2) Power OFF during the BIOS RAM count (or anytime before XP starts to load). If you are too slow you will have to wait for WinXP to finish starting up and then also cancel any AutoPlay for the disc and then select SHUTDOWN.

3) Computer is now off, open her up, leave the system (SOURCE) drive right where it is, add the DESTINATION drive somewhere (mind your jumpers and cable position for PATA). Doublecheck!

4) Hit the Power button and wait for the CD to load. I believe there is a prompt for MINIMAL or FULL drivers. Accept the default minimal (ATA) as the extra stuff is for USB or Networks.

5) The first choice on the menu should say CLONING. Do it.

6) The big decision comes next: MANUAL or AUTOMATIC. Being the manual type myself, I can shed some light on this. MANUAL means you will have to click over and over again on DESTINATION partition sizes. AUTOMATIC means a proportional transfer. If there is only one partition that might be fine, but I still select MANUAL anyway to eat up any extra space (add it back to the partition). Everything you need to know is in that PDF file (linked in my previous post) in Chapter 10: Transferring the system to a new disc. Experience is useful here, especially when wiping out Dell Utility/Restore partitions (or even preserving them). Just remember that if your 20 GB had three partitions: 5/5/10; the new 100 GB drive without manual intervention will have 25/25/50. Often times we would change that to 5/5/90 for example (preservation). As mentioned previously, this is much like Gparted. You can do anything in here with some effort (and a lot of clicking). Oh yeah, in the partition manipulation GUI there is a choice called Proceed relayout. Tick that thing so that the program goes to the partition resizing page. When you see this option you will already be knee-deep in partitioning and will no doubt understand it. To anyone else they will roll their eyes as it no doubt makes no sense! Anyway, eyeball your work before you commit. You will be greeted with a few more buttons to click, one dialog shows the scripted operations that will occur. Click away. There is usually a reboot here (***) then the cloning occurs, then you wind up back in the program ...

7) When you click on Exit the program will shutdown the computer. That is very helpful as it is necessary to Power Off now. Open her up. Pull the System HDD (now you have a nice fallback drive for catastrophic events). Replace it with the DESTINATION. As above, mind your jumpers and cable position for PATA. Doublecheck!

8) Button her up and Power On. Enter the BIOS ... Needless to say if one was PATA and one was SATA you should verify the BIOS now, the good ones are very automatic on sensing these interfaces. Sometimes you can even skip the previous step and leave them both hooked up and select which one to boot from and disable the other. BIOS dual/triple/quad booting ... Otherwise we're really in the BIOS now to disable the CD bootup (well that's what the smart ones do :whistle: ) AND restore the HDD as first in sequence. Now is a good time to eject the CD. SAVE and EXIT.

9) Marvel at your work as you watch the Windows XP bootscreen (actually thank Acronis True Image). You should land in Windows on a bigger drive but all else is the same. NB: I wonder when WinXP actually alters the registry entry for the HDD because if you pop into Device Manager it has already changed. I suspect that there is a lot going on behind that bootscreen or sometime before the Welcome Screen.

(***) for future reference. As I just wrote this I realized that script persists through a reboot!?! Hmmm. Perhaps some Acronis gurus can enlighten me on how they achieved it. My guess: PowerQuest/Vcomm style MBR code or some other unused disk area outside the proper file system. :sneaky:

Hope This Helps!

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#10
LordFett

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I understood how to do what you posted, I just was already in the process of doing what I tried and realize now my mistake, the 100gb had previously been used in this instance of windows.

Giving your method a whirl.
"The difference between myself and a mad man, is I am not mad" Salvadore Dali 1904-1989

#11
LordFett

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Used the seagate program, looks like it worked. Was really simple, I think you over explained it a little Charlotte. D/L program install made cd reboot from cd copy disk.

Up the irons.
"The difference between myself and a mad man, is I am not mad" Salvadore Dali 1904-1989

#12
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Used the seagate program, looks like it worked. Was really simple, I think you over explained it a little Charlotte. D/L program install made cd reboot from cd copy disk.

Up the irons.


Sorry 'bout that. Guess I hijacked your thread and turned it into a Cloning how-to! "Lieutenant, verbosity is my middle name".

Glad it worked though. This exact issue comes up often here and in other forums and I just wanted to offer the K.I.S.S. method. I actually do use Ghost often and it is perfect for managing multiple images but I think it is overkill for simple System disk replacement. Gonna have to grab the full version of Acronis True Image now just to see what bells and whistles were left out of the neutered Seagate version (if any).

:thumbup Congrats. l8r

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...





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