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Faster Startup For Windows 2000?

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#76
Dave-H

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Booting from the Windows XP CD.

Yes thanks, that what I eventually did.
:yes:

If Master File Table or registry hive fragmentation is not great on your system (documented problems for the boot loader), the problem your are having would seem to be a bug in the Windows XP boot loader or other files involved in the boot process.

Thanks for that Ascii2, I will check it out.
I'm interested what you say adout "registry hive fragmentation" as my registry is quite large and has never been optimised, so is probably very fragmented.
I optimise my Windows 98 registry all the time as I have startup problems if it gets too large, but I have never bothered on Windows 2000.
I'm wondering if this may be an issue here.
:)

Edited by Dave-H, 11 February 2009 - 02:55 AM.

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#77
Ascii2

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I'm interested what you say adout "registry hive fragmentation" as my registry is quite large and has never been optimised, so is probably very fragmented.
I optimise my Windows 98 registry all the time as I have startup problems if it gets too large, but I have never bothered on Windows 2000.
I'm wondering if this may be an issue here.
:)

Older versions of NTLDR could not load large fragmented registry hives during Windows boot (this was before Windows XP; Windows 2000 with Service Pack 4 NTLDR). Newer versions of NTLDR should not (not the same as "do not") have the problem.

Auslogics Registry Defrag (among many others) is software that may defragment registry hive files. If the registry hives that are maintained loaded in memory stay at about the same size (regardless if the size is great), do not expect much fragmentation.

By the way, if you test versions of NTLDR, it may be wise to keep a copy of the versions boot.ini, NTDETECT.COM, NTLDR, Ntbootdd.sys if necessary for SCSI, and possibly arcldr.exe and arcsetup.exe that boot Windows 2000 on a floppy. If you cannot later boot, from the hard disk partition, you may use the floppy to boot Windows 2000.

Also Dav-H, do you have a recovery console installed?

Edited by Ascii2, 11 February 2009 - 03:46 PM.


#78
Dave-H

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Thanks.
I have never had ntbootdd.sys, arcldr.exe or arcsetup.exe on my system.
It has always seemed to work fine without them.
The latter two are in the %systemroot%\ServicePackFiles\i386 folder.
Ntbootdd.sys doesn't exist at all.

My "SYSTEM" registry file is 9.25MB in size.
Is that excessive?

I do have the Recovery Console installed.
:)

Edited by Dave-H, 11 February 2009 - 04:59 PM.

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#79
Ascii2

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My "SYSTEM" registry file is 9.25MB in size.
Is that excessive?

The size is large, although possibly not excessive (not something I am able to determine for you).

I do have the Recovery Console installed.

The Recovery Console comes with a boot loader and NTDETECT.COM. Different versions of Recovery Console exist with different versions of their boot loader (CMLDR). I believe your problem is mainly do to design (defects) of the boot loaders.

Try removing the Recovery Console, prepare a floppy capable of booting Windows 2000 (in case booting from hard disk partitions fails later), install a recent version of Recovery Console (like from a Windows 2000 Professional with Service Pack 4 CD, not of a lower Service Pack), copy a recent version of Windows XP (not Windows Server 2003, as it seems to use a different file to load the operating system) NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM to the root of the system drive, and restart the computer.

#80
jaclaz

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(not Windows Server 2003, as it seems to use a different file to load the operating system)

This is news to me.
Care to expand on this? :unsure:


@Dave_H
Something that you may want to try is to move the various NTLDR's to different partitions/directories or put them inside floppy images.

It's abit complex, but may prove a working workaround.

Basically you can use grub4dos' grldr as your "main" loader (or load it through a "base", NOT corrupting SYSTEM hive, NTLDR), then chainload from it a floppy image with the actual NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and BOOT.INI, an image simialr to the one depicted here:
http://www.xxcopy.com/xxcopy33.htm

It is less difficult than what it may seem at first sight , but undoubtedly not "straightforward".

If you need help/more details, just ask. :)

jaclaz

#81
Ascii2

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(not Windows Server 2003, as it seems to use a different file to load the operating system)

This is news to me.
Care to expand on this? :unsure:

Windows Server 2003 products may use a boot loader file named "Osloader.ntd" (NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM may still exist). I am uncertain between the relationship between the different boot loaders of Windows Server 2003.

#82
Dave-H

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Thanks guys,
jaclaz your possible suggestion sounds interesting, but are you saying that I would have to have a floppy image on a floppy disk in the floppy drive when I boot to implement it?

Ascii2 thanks for your input as always too.
I will wait until I can lay my hands on a Windows XP disk again to try it out.

There seems to be no uninstall routine for the Recovery Console.
Do I take it that all I need to do is delete the C:\CmdCons folder and remove the CMLDR file?
Is there anything else I need to remove before I try installing the XP version?

Cheers, Dave.
:)

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#83
Ascii2

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Ascii2 thanks for your input as always too.
I will wait until I can lay my hands on a Windows XP disk again to try it out.

The Windows XP disc (assuming you meant disc) is not necessary. Recent version of ntldr and ntdetect.com for Windows XP may be found within the Windows XP Service Pack 3 redistributable (or just use the files from the archive I have attached to this post). The files need not be expanded after extraction from the package.

There seems to be no uninstall routine for the Recovery Console.
Do I take it that all I need to do is delete the C:\CmdCons folder and remove the CMLDR file?

No. You also would need to delete the Recovery Console information from boot.ini.

Is there anything else I need to remove before I try installing the XP version?

If you are referring to Recovery Console that comes with Windows XP, yes. Versions of Recovery Console from a Windows XP operating system of at least Service Pack level 2 will perform an OS check. If the operating system is not determined to match the operating system in use (including Service Pack level), installation aborts. I would recommend installing the recovery console from a Windows 2000 with Service Pack 4 CD (or bootdisks) instead.

Edited by Yzöwl, 09 August 2011 - 06:46 AM.
Attachment Removed, (non-reditributable files)


#84
Dave-H

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Thanks again Ascii2.
Disc/disk, I've never been sure of the correct way to spell it depending on context.
I always use "disc" to refer to round flat things generally, especially old things like vinyl record discs, but "disks" (US spelling?) when referring to computer disks/discs!
A bit like "programme", the usual UK spelling, and "program", the US spelling, but always used when referring to computer programs.
In fact my spellcheck (supposedly UK English) says that it's always "disk", and "disc" doesn't exist!
:wacko:
Anyway, we digress............

Thanks for the files.
I tried them, but the same result of course.
:(

I don't have access to a Windows 2000 SP4 CD, all I have is an update installation file for SP4, and while that contains later versions of NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM (which still don't work) it has no Recovery Console files included in it.

I will do a search and see if I can download them from somewhere.
Cheers,
Dave.
:)

Edited by Dave-H, 19 February 2009 - 08:21 AM.

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#85
Dave-H

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Well, I now have an important update!
:yes:
I've made something of a breakthrough since my last post earlier to-day, which deserves a new post I think.
Not an actual fix I'm afraid, but I'm a lot nearer to understanding (I think) what's happening here.

I was wondering, if you remember, whether the size of my registry files was an issue.
My SYSTEM file, which is the file mentioned in the error message, is 9.26MB.
Having had similar issues with registry size in Windows 98 (here if anyone's interested) I wondered if this could be a similar issue.
I also read on the MS Knowledge Base that Windows 2000 only has 16MB of memory available while it's booting up.
So, I did an experiment.

I backed up my registry, and then substituted the SYSTEM file in D:\WIN-NT\System32\Config with the much smaller SYSTEM file in D:\WIN-NT\Repair. That file is only 2.77MB instead of 9.26MB.

I then installed the XP NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM files which Ascii2 kindly provided.

The system booted without the error message!
:thumbup

The "Starting Windows" bar didn't appear at all, and the progress bar on the splash screen was much faster in completing.
Then it went wrong.
:no:
It got as far as displaying the GUI background, but before the "Preparing Network Connections" message came up, the system just rebooted.
I tried again with the same result.

I then put the original SYSTEM file back, and tried again.
Same result!
I then put all the registry files back from their backups.
Same result!
Strangely, the system file was always reverting to the smaller version.
There is a SYSTEM.ALT file in the folder, and it's possible it was reverting to that.

I got the system up and running again by replacing the registry backups again, and the original startup files.
Then everything returned to normal.

So, I'm pretty convinced that the problem is being caused by the SYSTEM file being too large.
That almost certainly explains why simple later version startup file substitution works on some systems and not on others. It only works if the registry, or probably more specifically the SYSTEM file, is below a certain size.

I assume that the loader is trying to fit the registry into memory on boot, and basically it's too big to fit into the limited memory then available. The 2000 loader possibly doesn't do this, which may be one of the reasons that it's slower.
There must be more to it than that of course, or Windows XP installations would fail to boot if the registry got too big, but I'm sure that's the gist of the problem.

The smaller SYSTEM file I have in the Repair folder is I believe the one that was backed up when Windows 2000 was last installed. It is from October 2007, which would make sense as I did have to do a repair install not very long ago, and that was probably it.
Unfortunately it looks as if that file is not up to date enough now to start the system.

So, what I need to do is get the size of my existing registry down!
I've tried a compacter program on it, but that said that there was only 4% fragmentation, and made little difference.
The SOFTWARE file is huge, 36.3MB, but I'm hoping that it's only the SYSTEM file that I have to worry about.

So, what's stored in that file, and how can I go about reducing it?
I assume that it contains the stuff in the "System" hive.
I have three "ControlSets" as well as the "Current" one.
Is that really necessary as they seem to be rather a lot of data.
Can I somehow lose one or two of them without disaster?

Any more help greatly appreciated.
I feel I'm on the verge of finally cracking this now!
:)

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#86
Ascii2

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It seems that you made a discovery Dave-H.

It is possible that Windows XP does not allow its registry hives to grow very much and its loader cannot handle large registry hives as well as Windows 2000.

I have looked into this issue, and it seems that problems with large registry files were corrected in a patch during year 2000 and the fix was included in Windows 2000 Service Pack 2.

It may be best for you to use a recent version of the Windows Server 2003 boot loaders. Acording to KB302594, Windows 2003 should be able to load much larger registry hives. It may be that the Windows Server 2003 may not load Windows 2000 as quickly as a recent boot loader from Windows 2000.

Note that Windows Server 2003 also uses a boot loader "Osloader.ntd".

Articles related to registry hive size and boot (none pertaining to Windows XP):

http://support.micro....com/kb/302594/
http://support.micro....com/kb/259930/
http://support.micro....com/kb/270028/
http://support.micro....com/kb/277222/
http://support.micro....com/kb/216369/


Edited by Ascii2, 20 February 2009 - 04:27 PM.


#87
Ascii2

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I don't have access to a Windows 2000 SP4 CD, all I have is an update installation file for SP4, and while that contains later versions of NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM (which still don't work) it has no Recovery Console files included in it.

If you slipstream the Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 update into a Windows 2000 installation source the . The Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 redistributable does not contain all the files necessary to install the updated Recovery Console, but once slipstreamed into a Windows 2000 installation source, the updated Recovery console may be invoked using the installation source's "Winnt32.exe".

A download from Microsoft Corporation exists that has the files necessary to install the Recovery Console, but installing from it is not publicly a Microsoft documented method (I have forgotten what package(s) exactly to download).

#88
jaclaz

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(not Windows Server 2003, as it seems to use a different file to load the operating system)

This is news to me.
Care to expand on this? :unsure:

Windows Server 2003 products may use a boot loader file named "Osloader.ntd" (NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM may still exist). I am uncertain between the relationship between the different boot loaders of Windows Server 2003.

Well, Osloader.ntd is ONLY used when booting from ADS:
http://support.micro...kb/843536/en-us

Probably :unsure: just like SETUPLDR.EX_ is used instead of SETUPLDR.BIN for PXE/RIS installs/PE's.

Thanks guys,
jaclaz your possible suggestion sounds interesting, but are you saying that I would have to have a floppy image on a floppy disk in the floppy drive when I boot to implement it?


Of course NOT. B)

Basically:

You choose a "main" set of loader files, let's say the Windows 2000 ones, and have them in C:\:
NTLDR (from win2k)
NTDETECT.COM (from win2k)
BOOT.INI (with ONLY entries for your Win2k)

You add to BOOT.INI this line:

C:\grldr="grub4dos"


Then you add to root the grldr file from grub4dos:
http://www.boot-land...hp?showtopic=14

And a menu.lst containing (among others) entries like:

title Windows XP
find --set-root /winxp.ima
map --mem /winxp.ima (fd0)
map --hook
root (fd0)
chainloader /ntldr


Read the grub4dos guide:
http://www.boot-land...?showtopic=5187

Then you create a number of floppy images, like the one depicted on http://www.xxcopy.com/xxcopy33.htm , each with a given "set" of NTLDR+NTDETECT.COM+BOOT.INI. (and you save them in the ROOT of C:\ or another drive, or in another path on your hard disk)

The floppy image can be gzip compressed, or alternatively, Zip compressed if you use memdisk, and memdisk can be gzip compressed, some details are here:
http://www.boot-land...?...c=3963&st=0

A suitable app for creating floppy images is VFD:
http://chitchat.at.i...vmware/vfd.html

A similar approach and some more details:
http://www.msfn.org/...howtopic=127900

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 21 February 2009 - 05:49 AM.


#89
Dave-H

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Thanks guys.
:)

Sorry jaclaz, I think I understand now!
I obviously had completely the wrong end of the stick there.
It would of course be very silly indeed to have to have a floppy in the floppy drive to boot up!
I will follow up your suggestion if I don't get anywhere with my registry investigations.

Ascii2, thanks so much for researching those KB articles for me!
The one I was most interested in was 269075, which contains a section on reducing the size of the SYSTEM hive, which is exactly what I want to do.

I went through it, but was puzzled to find that one of the registry keys that it refers to doesn't seem to exist on my system.
It's "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Share".

All I have under \CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer is a subkey called "Shares", not "Share".
That is empty apart from a "Security" subkey, which is also empty.

There is no "Share" key in any of the ControlSets under that path, so I couldn't proceed with that procedure to reduce the SYSTEM hive size.

I did get hold of copies of the Windows 2003 NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and OSLOADER.NTD files and gave them a try.
Really bad move!
:no:
It didn't boot, with the same error message, and when I went into Windows 98 to put the original files back, I got a frightening message that the MBR was corrupted!
When I went into the Windows 98 Recycle Bin it warned me that was corrupted.
Most worrying of all, when I went into "My Computer" on Windows 98 I found to my horror that all the drive letters (except C: of course fortunately) had been rearranged!

I was really worried that I'd hosed the system completely, but fortunately once I'd restored the original 2000 startup files and deleted osloader.ntd, everything returned to normal after a reboot.

So, where do I go from here..........
:)

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#90
Ascii2

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The one I was most interested in was 269075, which contains a section on reducing the size of the SYSTEM hive, which is exactly what I want to do.

I went through it, but was puzzled to find that one of the registry keys that it refers to doesn't seem to exist on my system.
It's "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Share".

All I have under \CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer is a subkey called "Shares", not "Share".
That is empty apart from a "Security" subkey, which is also empty.

There is no "Share" key in any of the ControlSets under that path, so I couldn't proceed with that procedure to reduce the SYSTEM hive size.

"Share" probably should have been "Shares" in the KB article; "Share" may be a typo.

You should be able to delete one of your three ControlSets. Check the [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Select] key to determine what control sets are being used for "Current", "Default", and "LastKnownGood". You may delete all other ControlSets.

If you are able to reduce you SYSTEM hive sufficiently such that the Windows XP boot loader is able to load Windows 2000, Windows 2000 may in the future fail to boot if the SYSTEM hive continues to grow. It may best just to continue using the Windows 2000 boot loot files.

Edited by Ascii2, 22 February 2009 - 02:10 PM.


#91
Dave-H

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Thanks again Ascii2.
I think I'm at the point of giving up now.
:(
I managed to get rid of one of my ControlSets, one that was marked as "failed".
It took me a while to work out how to change the permissions so the system would allow me to delete it. but eventually I did. This made very little difference to the SYSTEM file size.

I then ran a registry compacter for NT registries which I found called NTREGOPT, which reduced it from 9MB to 6.2MB!
At last I thought, but still no go, the system still wouldn't start with any of the newer start-up files.
:no:

It looks as if three ControlSets is the minimum you can have, the Current, Default, and Last Good.
Delete any of those and either the system won't start, or if it does it puts the deleted one straight back again.

If even 6.2MB is too big for the system to start, I think I'm defeated.
It started with the 2MB SYSTEM file in my Repair folder, but the system wouldn't complete loading, so that's no good.
I can't imagine that I would ever get my working SYSTEM file down to anywhere near that size without removing so much that the system would be crippled.

I'm now very worried for those earlier in the thread who said that their systems worked fine with the loader files from XP or 2003. I suspect that this only worked because they had very small SYSTEM registry hives.
There is of course a high probability that this will not remain the case, and they will suddenly fail to boot without any warning. "Last Good Configuration" should work in that scenario, and I hope it does!

I hope that if this happens to people that they read to the end of this thread and discover what the problem is, and that they've kept backups of their original 2000 loader files (or have a 2000 disk to restore them from!)

So, I'm resigned to keeping the loaders as they are on my system.
I have at least pruned the registry size considerably, which can't be a bad thing!

My next line of attack (and I haven't ruled out trying jaclaz's proposed solution as well) is to try and just get my present boot a bit quicker.
I've done all the obvious things like disabling all unnecessary services and startup programs, but the main problem is very early on in the process.
I've done some research into the 2000 boot process, but haven't been able to find a definitive account of what order things happen in, and what's on the screen at that time.

The "Starting Windows" bar goes across pretty quickly, so that's not a worry.
The big pause comes at the next stage, the splash screen.
The progress bar at the bottom moves across in jerks, but pretty quickly, until it gets about three quarters of the way across.
It then pauses, for about 20-25 seconds, before moving on.
That is what I really want to get rid of, as I'm absolutely sure that it hasn't always done that.

I don't know what's happening at that point, but there's no disk activity during the pause.
It's like it's waiting for something, or looking for or scanning for something.

I suspect it's hardware device related.
When it reaches the pause point, the keyboard lights flash momentarily, and then go out.
They come back on when the bar moves on after the pause.
Also at that moment there is sometimes a flash on the screen, and occasionally the display blacks out and then comes on again. This all sounds like hardware driver loading, but why the long pause?

If I could get rid of that, and as I said I'm sure it hasn't always done it, I would be satisfied!

Any ideas?
I have no "problem" hardware on the system as far as I know.
Cheers,
Dave.
:)

Dual boot Windows 98SE SP2.1a and Windows XP Professional SP3.
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#92
Colonel O'Neill

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True, we (those who can use new bootloaders) should be concerned; occasionally my 2000 fails to boot; complaining about system hive being corrupt.

As for the Starting Windows graphical progress bar part, my progress bar starts out half way (weird) and does get stuck at 75% often.

And a 9.0 MB SYSTEM hive? My current SYSTEM hive is 2,948KB. My repair SYSTEM is only 932KB. Could it be too much slipstreaming?

Honestly, the 2003 loader occasionally fails to resume from Hibernate in 2000. So after downgrading back to the XP loader, Hibernate resumed almost always. Maybe speeding up Hibernate is the way of the future?
T400: 7x86
X100e: 7x86, 2008R2 (in progress), 2000 (in progress).

#93
Ascii2

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I then ran a registry compacter for NT registries which I found called NTREGOPT, which reduced it from 9MB to 6.2MB!
At last I thought, but still no go, the system still wouldn't start with any of the newer start-up files.

6.2 MB does seem like a reasonable size.


It looks as if three ControlSets is the minimum you can have, the Current, Default, and Last Good.

The minimum is one or two. Usually "Current" and "Default" reference the same ControlSet and Last Good refers to an additional ControlSet used for the Last Known Good Configuration. I am uncertain if the operation system would boot if the Last Good Control set were deleted.

The "Starting Windows" bar goes across pretty quickly, so that's not a worry.
The big pause comes at the next stage, the splash screen.
The progress bar at the bottom moves across in jerks, but pretty quickly, until it gets about three quarters of the way across.
It then pauses, for about 20-25 seconds, before moving on.
That is what I really want to get rid of, as I'm absolutely sure that it hasn't always done that.

I don't know what's happening at that point, but there's no disk activity during the pause.
It's like it's waiting for something, or looking for or scanning for something.

I suspect it's hardware device related.
When it reaches the pause point, the keyboard lights flash momentarily, and then go out.
They come back on when the bar moves on after the pause.
Also at that moment there is sometimes a flash on the screen, and occasionally the display blacks out and then comes on again. This all sounds like hardware driver loading, but why the long pause?

If I could get rid of that, and as I said I'm sure it hasn't always done it, I would be satisfied!

The long pause during Windows 2000 boot is normal. You possibly may be able to lessen the length of the pause, but it would still remain long relative to the other occurrences during the boot process.

My next line of attack (and I haven't ruled out trying jaclaz's proposed solution as well) is to try and just get my present boot a bit quicker.
I've done all the obvious things like disabling all unnecessary services and startup programs, but the main problem is very early on in the process.

Try the following to lessen the boot time:

Examine the drivers you have installed, remove unless drivers, change inefficient drivers if possible, or replace or remove hardware (and their drivers).
Check the hard disk acoustic management, power management, and transfer mode settings if they exist and adjust them to maximize performance.
Adjust BIOS settings to improve boot performance if possible.

Ensure that all cables are well connected and of sufficient quality.



#94
dencorso

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Disc/disk, I've never been sure of the correct way to spell it depending on context.
I always use "disc" to refer to round flat things generally, especially old things like vinyl record discs, but "disks" (US spelling?) when referring to computer disks/discs!
A bit like "programme", the usual UK spelling, and "program", the US spelling, but always used when referring to computer programs.
In fact my spellcheck (supposedly UK English) says that it's always "disk", and "disc" doesn't exist!
:wacko:
Anyway, we digress............

I know it doesn't solve your issue, and, yes, is some more digression... :rolleyes: but I think the correct usage is "disc" for optical media and vinyl records, and disk for every other round flat media, including Magneto-Optical and Zip Disks, except for common floppies, where diskette applies. See also DISC/DISK and Spelling of disc (Wikipedia).

Now back to topic: did you use Scrubber (KB277222) to help reduce your registry size?

#95
Dave-H

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I did try downloading and running the scrubber hotfix from MS, but it didn't make any noticeable difference to the size of my SYSTEM hive, but thanks for the suggestion.

As I said on the "Puzzling Registry Size Issue" thread over on the Windows 98 forum, I'm amazed that this 16MB memory limitation during startup was perpetuated from Windows 98 to Windows 2000!
It appears that it was finally addressed in Windows 2003, but there seems to be no way of porting that across to Windows 2000 installations.
:)

Dual boot Windows 98SE SP2.1a and Windows XP Professional SP3.
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#96
caps_buster

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I must say that I was little dubious, when I read this thread, but I finished reading it, determined that I try this. I obtained the ntldr and NTDETECT.COM files from Windows 2003 server SP2 Enterprise and non-SP Corporate editions. I quess that there is no download link because of the copyright, but hit me with PM and I provide the link to them...

Anyway, I made backup by DriveImage and measured by stopwatch the boot time - since the post screen dim to the flick of the Windows screen when the GFX nVidia card get overclocked and it is old one, so it flick with the image and one can begin use the computer. Please note I just now, temporaly, running on a VERY old machine, it is a JetWay V266B mainboard with KT266A chipset, 1G ram 2-2-2-5, overclocked to 150MHz FSB x 12.5 with AXP Barton CPU at 1875MHz and FX5600XT. On this I run Windows 2000 SP4, with disabled everything I can. I striped out every little thing I managed, so...

Original Windows 2000 SP4 boot files - time 38:62 sec
Windows 2003 server Corporate files - time 28:29 sec

Now that is a little over 10 sec, witch obviously made me VERY happy, I was like HOLLY SH*T when I saw that for the first time. And since I type this after a scandisk and with eMule running and ICQ and Firefox and stuff - it looks like that there is no stability penalty for the nice boot time.

The bottom line is, that since I start my machine in the morning, then go to breakfast and stuff, I did not really need the fast boot time... But it definitively is a great improve and for what? For nothing, just two files and that it is. I can only recommend to everyone!

Sorry Dave-H that it did not work out for you. Out there the results is amazing at very least!
Disclaimer: Any errors in spelling, tact, or fact are transmission errors.

#97
Dave-H

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Glad it worked for you Pavel!
:thumbup

I tried using both of the two sets of startup files that you kindly gave me a link to, but neither worked.
:no:

Just the usual "Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt \WIN-NT\SYSTEM32\CONFIG\SYSTEM" error message as soon as the system tried to start.
:(

How big is your system32\config\system file as a matter of interest?

Edited by Dave-H, 28 February 2009 - 07:15 PM.

Dual boot Windows 98SE SP2.1a and Windows XP Professional SP3.
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#98
caps_buster

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Well, it is working and surprisingly fast... The WinNT\system32\config\system file is 2 596 864 bytes long, together with its ALT and BAK cousins.

Pretty well optimized Win2k SP4, huh? :hello:

Sorry to hear that these files was not any help to you - probably time to clean out the garbage in your windows?
Disclaimer: Any errors in spelling, tact, or fact are transmission errors.

#99
ntoskrnl

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As this stuff can also be applied to NT4, and it speeds the boot up quite a bit, I'm using it.

Now I'm thinking whether the boot files from XP SP3 or S2k3 SP2 are better/faster, as the XP ones are newer with it's SP3.

Do you guys have any clue?

#100
Dave-H

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Well, it is working and surprisingly fast... The WinNT\system32\config\system file is 2 596 864 bytes long, together with its ALT and BAK cousins.

Pretty well optimized Win2k SP4, huh? :hello:

Sorry to hear that these files was not any help to you - probably time to clean out the garbage in your windows?

Well my SYSTEM file is still 6.22MB, and that's after deleting one of the "ControlSets" that wasn't needed!
I can't think of any other way to make it significantly smaller, as the ControlSets still left seem to all be necessary.

My understanding is that the SYSTEM hive should only contain the information necessary for the computer to start.
The number of software programs installed should not affect it, as their data is stored elsewhere (presumably in the "SOFTWARE" hive!)

What is in SYSTEM is the hardware configuration data, including things like the details of every storage device that you've ever attached to the system, but I've tried going through that and deleting any redundant obsolete entries, and it actually make little or no difference to the file size, even after running a registry optimiser/compacter program on it.
:(

Dual boot Windows 98SE SP2.1a and Windows XP Professional SP3.
Dual 3.16GHz X5460 Quad Core Xeons with 8GB RAM. Asus AMD Radeon HD5450 Graphics 1920x1080 32 Bit Colour with Large Fonts.





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