Jump to content

Welcome to MSFN Forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account



Photo

Easy linux operating system

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

Poll: Easiest linux (25 member(s) have cast votes)

Which is most easy to use

  1. Linspire 6 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  2. Puppy linux 4 (3 votes [11.54%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.54%

  3. fedora linux (4 votes [15.38%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.38%

  4. debian (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. gentoo (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  6. mandriva linux (1 votes [3.85%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.85%

  7. ubuntu linux (16 votes [61.54%])

    Percentage of vote: 61.54%

  8. knoppix (1 votes [3.85%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.85%

  9. slackware (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  10. slax linux (1 votes [3.85%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.85%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#1
specialbao1

specialbao1

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 149 posts
  • Joined 25-January 08
Which is the best and easy Linux operating system.
I bought Linspire and that is easy and good.
Also give your opinion.


How to remove advertisement from MSFN

#2
Nuno Brito

Nuno Brito

    .script developer

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 268 posts
  • Joined 11-May 06
I use Ubuntu and it's a straightforward OS that replaced windows XP/Vista on my work machines.

Now I only run XP as an emulated OS whenever needed and it runs perfectly this way.

http://nunobrito1981...-to-ubuntu.html

:)
WinBuilder - XP/Vista LiveOS projects
nuno? --> pics

Do you really like Windows PE? Then you should really try pe21.003 - http://www.msfn.org/...howtopic=130308
Very cool project.

#3
joe43wv

joe43wv

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 242 posts
  • Joined 08-May 08
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
I've ran Fedora because it was what I was taught on when I took a Linux class last fall in college. It seems pretty reliable and stable.

#4
specialbao1

specialbao1

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 149 posts
  • Joined 25-January 08
linspire has also got ubuntu at its core.
and some extra features also some proprietary software also

#5
Zxian

Zxian

    Scroll up - see the Google bar?

  • Super Moderator
  • 5,066 posts
  • Joined 30-September 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
I'd never pay for Linux.

I'm using Fedora9 on my linux workstation, and CentOS for my servers. Both are very simple to use and manage. I personally find rpm and yum much easier to use than deb and apt.

Of course - if you want the best *nix server OS, then FreeBSD is the way to go. :yes:

#6
CoffeeFiend

CoffeeFiend

    Coffee Aficionado

  • Super Moderator
  • 5,399 posts
  • Joined 14-July 04
  • OS:Windows 7 x64
  • Country: Country Flag
It comes down to preferences really.

We got Ubuntu on a couple boxes here (dual booting), but we've used plenty of others too.

Edit: I can't say it's exactly perfect either though... I had to recompile alsa-everything to have audio working, I had to edit the x.org config file to have a non-stupid resolution on the login screen (this is getting seriously old), other users weren't sudo'ers in the first place (was pretty restrictive for some stuff, like having to change user to be able to install the flash player), it's a pain having to select your language every time you log in (if someone else used it, and picked a different language meanwhile), the selection of a beta version of firefox for which most extensions weren't working with at the time of release, having to use autocutsel for copy/paste in VNC to work at all, an update breaking a perfectly good and working OpenLDAP install, etc. All kinds of stuff :( Works great for a lot of things, but they're not dual booting XP for no reason.

Server wise, I prefer Debian to RHEL/CentOS precisely because of deb & apt instead of rpm :lol: But even there, there's so many options... So many distros. And some people do indeed prefer FreeBSD.

Edited by crahak, 10 July 2008 - 10:26 AM.

Coffee: \ˈkȯ-fē, ˈkä-\. noun. Heaven in a cup. Life's only treasure. The meaning of life. Kaffee ist wunderbar. C8H10N4O2 FTW.

#7
CoffeeFiend

CoffeeFiend

    Coffee Aficionado

  • Super Moderator
  • 5,399 posts
  • Joined 14-July 04
  • OS:Windows 7 x64
  • Country: Country Flag
I'm slowly giving up on it these days. From GRUB problems, to having to recompile ALSA everything & editing the alsa config file to have audio working (over spdif), to Hardy Heron freezing solid on the kids box pretty much daily (I tend to blame the ati drivers for that one -- too bad it's not windows, no minidumps to check!), a LOT of flickering of the screen on some stuff like supertux which one of my daughters likes a lot (ATI again) -- thankfully it runs great on Windows, and sometimes sound doesn't work at all until you reboot (probably something with the SB live 5.1 having problems with the newly adopted Pulse Audio) but it's hardly surprising when you know how much of a mess Linux audio is, power saving not working nearly as smooth as Windows' on that box (pretty annoying), numerous issues with Hardy Heron in general that I didn't have with 7.10: Network Manager sucks, the update manager saying its up to date when sometimes it isn't, not coming with the tools to create network shares anymore (install nautilus-share, then reboot, and to change workgroup name, you again have to edit the samba config file by hand), not having the most interesting options of compiz fusion enabled by default, nor having the app to configure it installed by default, etc.

So 2 of my boxes are no longer dual booting... I just don't have the time to try another dozen distros, learn all the specific quirks those have, and all the necessary workarounds/fixes. Windows just works on these boxes, all the time, reliably. No crashes, freezes, strange problems or anything... Linux only seems to bring you different problems (and more of them from what I've seen).

Edited by crahak, 30 July 2008 - 11:43 PM.

Coffee: \ˈkȯ-fē, ˈkä-\. noun. Heaven in a cup. Life's only treasure. The meaning of life. Kaffee ist wunderbar. C8H10N4O2 FTW.

#8
dirtbag33

dirtbag33
  • Member
  • 1 posts
  • Joined 24-February 08
Anyone looking for an easy to use and configure Linux should take a look at PCLinuxOS. It's a Mandr(ake)iva derivative built with ease of use and stability in mind.

#9
deda

deda

    Junior

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 73 posts
  • Joined 25-August 06
Linux is a try to run Unix on a PC; Unix is a micro system to allow corporations have a mainframe without the mainframe costs, but with the same methodology, logical and resources (tech personnel, developers, etc). Unix wasn't built to be a desktop. A simply change of architeture and/or platform will not change this.

#10
Th3_uN1Qu3

Th3_uN1Qu3

    Digital sinner

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 386 posts
  • Joined 17-March 08
Ubuntu, PCLinuxOS, or Puppy Linux if you want something small and portable. Puppy isn't very good for a Linux beginner, as apart from the basic wizard-based configuration you'll have some stuff to do yourself, but it's a very good platform to learn Linux on, and it's FAST. ;)

Edited by Th3_uN1Qu3, 16 July 2008 - 01:50 PM.

What's the point of security features if we have to disable them for things to work right?

p35-ds3 / e6550 @ 3.5ghz 500fsb scythe mugen / 8gb pqi ddr2 800 @ 1000 / sapphire hd3870 / 320gb wd / x64 / nokia 920c 19"
toshi portege 4010 / p3 tualatin @ 933mhz / 512mb pc133 sdram / 16mb cyberblade / wifi / irda / sd / 30gb ibm / me / 12.1" tft
6bxds / 2x p3 @ 700mhz / 1gb cl2 sdram / sapphire 9800 pro 256mb / awe64 isa / sil3112a pci + 320gb wd / xp / thomson 24" tv

#11
maggotspawn

maggotspawn

    Newbie

  • Member
  • 26 posts
  • Joined 18-August 08
I just started messing around with Puppy 4.00 and love it.
Lean and stable, takes very little to setup a dualboot with it.
MSI G33M, Q6600, G0 stepping, OC'd to 3.0 GHz, 4 GB Mushkin DDR2 800 , 160 GB WD SATA 2 HD, 1 TB WD SATA 2 HD, Lite-On DVD Burner, Seasonic S-12 PSU, Windows XP Pro SP2
ACER Extensa 5620Z, Pentium Dualcore 1.86 GHz T2390, 3 GB DDR2 533 , 160 GB SATA HD, Etc.
Triplebooting Vista Home Premium SP1, Windows XP Home SP2, Puppy Linux 4.00

#12
doomangel

doomangel

    Dreamer

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 57 posts
  • Joined 01-September 07
where is opensuse?and how many debian based distros can you add?
i will be heard




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users