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Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 Troubles

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#1001
kadolf

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Are you using IDE Extended (or enhanced) only ? Do not use RAID or AHCI.

Also the drive is alone? No other is connected, except CD/DVD drive?

Yes, I'm using IDE mode. No other drives are connected, exept a SATA-DVD-writer - I will try to get one with IDE, maybe that's the problem.


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#1002
arnd

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I'm becoming more and more clueless: I have one of the famous ST3500320AS (which didn't fail as it was running 24/7), which I bought to replace a failed Samsung HD501LJ (failed after 478 hours of use, already 3 reallocated sectors and 71 pending sectors, and unable to read important sectors at all). I now tried WD disks and bough a RE3 (to be used in RAID) and a 640GB Caviar Black (WD6401AALS)... I immediately returned the RE3 as it was sold without warranty... And I will return the Caviar Black because I cancelled the bad block scan after just 32GB (of 640 GB): Between 73 and 125 uncorrected read errors reported to OS, 208 raw read errors, 2 reallocated sectors, 2 current pending sectors, and the log shows "UNC" unrecoverable data errors.

Up to now only laptop 2.5" drives failed on me after years of use, which I can understand due to shock and wear.

I had very good experience with Seagate in the past (mainly SCSI drives like Cheetah 15k) but the current 7200.11 events made me reluctant to stay with Seagate (even though these stories were regarding firmware and not data on the platters). Both Samsung and WD failed with lots of unrecoverable data errors on brand new drives...

So... Which hard disk manufacturer and which drive models can I rely on?

73, Arnd

#1003
eli2k

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Yesterday I had an amusing day at a big electronics store. When I asked about hard drives the sales person said "Oh you got to see the great sale on Seagate drives we have!" I thought to myself, "I bet", but proceeded to follow him. He showed me a whole stack of Seagate drives. I looked at them and they were the recent 7200.11 models! He said that they had marked them all down by $40. When I asked him why, he said with a big smile "Seagate wants us to clear them out!" I thought to myself, I bet they do..

At the check out the clerk said they were discounted even more to $109 for 1Tbs. Although I won't trust them with key data, Seagate has great hardware and once the firmware is sorted out I will have some really inexpensive drive storage... Course it'll be relegated to non important tasks! Going to be a while before I trust their drives again.


I wish a store nearby would discount these, so I can get a replacement PCB board to try the flashing :P

#1004
timha

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I wish a store nearby would discount these, so I can get a replacement PCB board to try the flashing :P
[/quote]


just so your on the right track, you are getting the donor goodharddisk , you are going to attache the badpcb to it for flashing... dont do it the other way around....hahh :thumbup

#1005
endeavor

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Hey guys

I've got a ST3750330AS drive and it flashed okay with yesterdays latest firmware, and all seemed to work okay, then the next day all the sudden I heard the drives head engage and disengage clicking back and forth a number of times as it disrupted everything I had running, and then stopped. It hasn't done this again yet and it's been quite a few more hours, but this head engage/disengage never ever did this before the firmware upgrade and I've had it for a year now. This is very disconcerting and I don't feel safe with this new firmware.

Everest shows all things in its SMART tab Okay though.

You know, I wish there had been an option on the firmware flash program to save the Original SD15 Firmware that was on there from the beginning, so that I could at least have the Option now to re-flash it back to what it was.

Anyone know where I can get the good version of the SD15 firmware I had?

#1006
sieve-x

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On old days (back in 2000) I used to hack firmwares for Pioneer burners (DVR-Axx family) as you can see here:
http://gradius.rpc1.org

Those old days reminds me of "conversions" thru firmware patches (ie. Liteon SOHW-812S
to Liteon 832S). That makes me wonder if it's possible to convert/flash a ST3500320AS to
ST3500320NS (Enterprise) using firmware SN06C (or ST31000340AS to ST31000340NS). <_<

I'm becoming more and more clueless: I have one of the famous ST3500320AS (which didn't fail as it was running 24/7), which I bought to replace a failed Samsung HD501LJ (failed after 478 hours of use, already 3 reallocated sectors and 71 pending sectors, and unable to read important sectors at all). I now tried WD disks and bough a RE3 (to be used in RAID) and a 640GB Caviar Black (WD6401AALS)... I immediately returned the RE3 as it was sold without warranty... And I will return the Caviar Black because I cancelled the bad block scan after just 32GB (of 640 GB): Between 73 and 125 uncorrected read errors reported to OS, 208 raw read errors, 2 reallocated sectors, 2 current pending sectors, and the log shows "UNC" unrecoverable data errors.

Up to now only laptop 2.5" drives failed on me after years of use, which I can understand due to shock and wear.

I had very good experience with Seagate in the past (mainly SCSI drives like Cheetah 15k) but the current 7200.11 events made me reluctant to stay with Seagate (even though these stories were regarding firmware and not data on the platters). Both Samsung and WD failed with lots of unrecoverable data errors on brand new drives...

So... Which hard disk manufacturer and which drive models can I rely on?

73, Arnd

I still have a 7 year old 36 GB Atlas II alive and running. SCSI always had a higher reliability
than (S)ATA drives (although higher reliability does not mean failure free - myself a victim of
a Micropolis 2217 crash very long time ago). SATA is the cheap bandwagon of reliability and
you could still rely on Seagate SAS/SCSI (all manufacturers have an issue at some point).

#1007
endeavor

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Also, fwiw, I've seen a few links to bring you to the Seagate page to download the firmware, like the link in the post a few above mine, but there's a much better link to go and I wish I went to it First to checknot only their #2 check link there for the Model number, but then more importantly the next #3 check link for the Serial number, and for me my model number said Yes but the Serial number said No it was not affected, and that could of saved me the predicament I'm in.

So as mentioned go This Link to verify #2 and especially #3 before you make a decision to firmware update.

#1008
dlethe

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The 7200.11 problems are being hyped all out of proportion. Seagate just released full details of the issue to OEMs. It is not anything like people are reporting it to be. Problem tied to certain test equipment and junk that it left on reserved areas of disk. More details on link below:

http://storagesecret...-overhyped-fud/

#1009
poolcarpet

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Hyped all out of proportion?? I don't think so.

Do you know how many people have ended up spending their own $$ to fix this **** problem? How are they going to compensate these people? This is a serious failure in Seagate's QC and they way they handled it earlier is downright unacceptable in terms of customer service. I know, people will say it is customer responsibility to ensure data backup, etc etc. I agree with that. However, I will NOT accept my data being unavailable due to some firmware/test defect in their manufacturing process. I accept hardware failures, but not this as this is clearly a breakdown in their process or human negligence (if someone was manning that test machine).

So now, they are providing analysis on what happened. I don't even want to know - to me, all I want to know is how Seagate is going to fix my hard disk for me for FREE . How many people have actually received details on that free recovery? I've contacted them but have not got an email reply yet so I am waiting.

How am I to know that the next Seagate hard disk will not be subjected to this same problem? How do you expect customers to continue to believe in this company's products? Everyone is p***ed off at the way they handled this problem - denying it and arrogantly asking customers to send in their drive for RMA OR expensive (read=thousands $$$) data recovery services is NOT the way to go for this sort of problem. Admitting it early and telling customers that they are working on a plan to assist customers should have been the way to go.



The 7200.11 problems are being hyped all out of proportion. Seagate just released full details of the issue to OEMs. It is not anything like people are reporting it to be. Problem tied to certain test equipment and junk that it left on reserved areas of disk. More details on link below:

http://storagesecret...-overhyped-fud/



#1010
dlethe

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How many people actually have a bricked drive due to a firmware bug vs. disks that died due to the traditional mechanical problems??? I don't know, do you know?
In any event the storagesecrets.org blog posted the Seagate 24x7 emergency data recovery telephone number, so you can contact them right now and chew them a good one. I'm not saying they don't deserve it, but if you want to find out what seagate is going to do to fix your disk, seems to me best way to find out is to call the data recovery people and ask them directly.

As for how do you know this won't happen again -- get real. Nobody knows. The only certainties in life are death & taxes ;)

Edited by dlethe, 25 January 2009 - 08:25 PM.


#1011
PrOfiLer

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Hellow from Portugal, help me please!
I have a Seagate 7200.11 st3500320as SD15 500GB BARRACUDA and my disk is dead, not detectable in BIOS.

I use this materials:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Nokia 3210 Unlock Cable to PS/2 connector
PS/2 connector to RS232 Serial connector

http://english.cxem....e/mobile129.php
http://free-zg.htnet...Jurkovic/nokia/
http://www.panuworld...les/general.htm

Posted Image

Posted Image

1-Green(BTEMP),2-Blue(TX),3-Black(GND),4-Red(MBUS),5-Orange(RX),6-Yellow(VPP) - (6 cables/colors)

I connect the GND pin from mother board for Black PS/2 cable.
I connect the +5v of Power LED pin from mother board for Yellow PS/2 cable.
I connect the TX (the blue cable in picture) for Orange PS/2 cable.
I connect the RX (the white cable in disk picture) for Blue PS/2 cable.

I connect the cables with hand made.

Example picture:
Posted Image


So I followed all the procedures of the 1st post of Gradius2, and the console's "HyperTerminal Private Edition" when I'm on, the computer begins to be something slow, CTRL+Z and nothing happens. As if there were no connection.

I´m stopped because of this problem disk and the data on my disk is very important to continue with my work for college.

Can all help me please? Thanks all very much!






WHOO HOOOOOOOO!!!!!!

ITS ALIVE!!!!!!!!

Extra special thanks to everyone who worked towards the BSY fix and all those people who took the time to help me and reply to all my questions.

I couldn't wait for my rs232 adapter that i ordered so i gambled and modified a nokia 3210 data cable and it worked. (Just with the RX TX connected..And SATA power to the drive of course).

Fortunately after I recovered the BSY fault, my drive was recognised as its proper size by my bios sata.

As we speak my data is being dumped from the drive to a different one.

Guy's i owe one hell of a lot of data to you lot.

THANK YOU!!!



#1012
dlethe

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The obvious question comes to mind .. how do you know your disk suffers from boot-of-death, and not something like a circuit board failure or massive head crash?

#1013
arnd

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The 7200.11 problems are being hyped all out of proportion. Seagate just released full details of the issue to OEMs. It is not anything like people are reporting it to be. Problem tied to certain test equipment and junk that it left on reserved areas of disk. More details on link below:

http://storagesecret...-overhyped-fud/


I'm not quite sure whether the root cause of the problem or the existence of the problem by itself has been the cause for the reactions. I think that the negligence and ignorance Seagate showed in regard to their customers ignited these reactions. It seems they did everything to harm their reputation IMHO. The storage business is built on trust and price competitiveness, where trust is a hard requirement. Furthermore they would have been aware that this was not to be expected hardware failures if they wouldn't have focused on removing posts from there forums and would have instead paid attention to their customers feedback.

#1014
dlethe

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Arnd, your statement will only prove to be correct if the true number of bricked drives due to this problem is "significant". My contention is that the odds of this happening are remote .. incredibly remote. Perhaps when/if there is a lawsuit, you will see a study of how many disks Seagate took on RMA that had confirmed bricking incidents. Furthermore, you said that Seagate should be aware this this was not to be expected failures? Well, duh, bugs are never expected. If they were expected they wouldn't be bugs. If they were aware of the bugs they would fix them.

Speaking from perspective of a former firmware architect. This was a nasty thing to track down and probably took thousands of man-hours to diagnose. Give them some credit for putting enough manpower on the problem so it was diagnosed and fixed so quickly. Furthermore, you have no idea what bugs there are in other models of disk drives, many are much worse, some have 100% guarantee of data destruction. I know, I have the NDA reports and won't tell you any more ... except that the number of people who have this problem, due to the nature of the chain-of-events that must lead up to the event, is rather small compared to other issues.

Trust me, there isn't a disk drive or raid controller, or any product in the marketplace that is 100% bug-free. That is why people buy redundant hardware and make backups. You can get all "ignited" over the issue, but I rather vent my dissatisfaction with Microsoft. Look at the fear out there. You have a previous poster showing us pictures of his rigging of the serial port for a drive that may or may not be bricked ... no telling how much money he has spent. Odds strongly favor his problem has nothing to do with the firmware. If this issue wasn't so hyped up, perhaps he would have sent it to seagate who would have fixed it for free if it was a bricking problem, or at least they would quote him a repair price before he spent all of this time risking making the problem worse. People think because they have a dead drive, that it is due to a massive firmware bug that afflicts 30%-40% of the seagate disks out there, according to a certain lawfirm. Give me a break. no way. If the problem was that prevalent, then it would have been caught in test in a matter of minutes.

P.S. As for removing posts, I do not know the contents of the deleted posts. If the posts had inaccurate information about Seagate that was stated as fact, then Seagate should remove them. At the very least it degrades the value of the forum, especially when people google those specific posts looking for some answers. Bad/inaccurate info must always be removed for benefit of who comes in the future. What if it turned out that the problem was due to a bad motor? I wouldn't want to come to the Seagate site some time in the future and waste my time looking for a firmware update. Conversely, if Seagate removed posts due to a little public relations work, then I agree with you, the posts should have stayed. (Providing they had some inherent value to the forum. If the posts were complaints and rants from somebody who had a mechanical disk drive that didn't survive the warranty period, then I can forgive deleting it

#1015
steveredman

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Hey guys,

I've been trying to get somewhere with a Seagate ST31000333AS for a couple of weeks now, after reading these forums I tried the serial fix but never got a response from the drive, I figured maybe my RS232 => TTL converter was not right for the job. I bought a second identical drive a while ago that still works so I figured after reading this morning that I'd try swapping the faulty drive's PCB onto the new drive and then flash it with the firmware, this was successful but after swapping it back onto the faulty disk it still is not detected by the BIOS. The drive itself makes a pulsing buzzing sound quietly when it is powered up, has anyone else experienced this?

Thanks,

Steve

#1016
dlethe

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Steve: Respectfully ... are you nuts?? Send it to seagate or some other company that will fix this for you. (Of course it may be a moot point now, as you have possibly tampered with the disk too much and destroyed the replacement warranty). It costs you nothing but return postage for them to tell you exactly what is wrong, and if it really is the bricking problem, they may fix it for free (some people report this, I can not confirm or deny). If the problem is something else then you can't fix it yourself anyway .. unless you have a bunny suit, a clean room, and a half-million dollars worth of equipment.

#1017
poolcarpet

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dlethe,

are you someone with interests in seagate? or a data recovery person who does not want to see people fix their own hard disk of this stupid problem? do you know how this thread started? this thread is what it is today, because numerous people have encountered this problem:

1. hard disk working fine
2. shutdown pc
3. with no apparent damage to any other components (ruling out electrical surges) and no physical damage to the hard disk, the hard disks totally disappears from the BIOS

From a few people reporting the exact same symptoms as above, to now a long list of people (look here http://www.msfn.org/...owtopic=128514) and even more people reporting success in unlocking their hard disks using the methods posted in here - you come in here to question whether we have diagnosed our problems correctly and start defending seagate??

tell me, if it's a hardware problem - why is it that so many hard disks 'fail' in/around december?

are you AlanM or BradC in disguise??


Steve: Respectfully ... are you nuts?? Send it to seagate or some other company that will fix this for you. (Of course it may be a moot point now, as you have possibly tampered with the disk too much and destroyed the replacement warranty). It costs you nothing but return postage for them to tell you exactly what is wrong, and if it really is the bricking problem, they may fix it for free (some people report this, I can not confirm or deny). If the problem is something else then you can't fix it yourself anyway .. unless you have a bunny suit, a clean room, and a half-million dollars worth of equipment.



#1018
dlethe

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Nope, I actually write disk testing software for storage subsystem manufacturers. I do not sell any hardware, or do I sell 3rd-party software. On rare situations, I fix disk drives for friends and families, but my company only does data recovery for certain RAID controllers that lose their metadata. We do not fix or repair disk drives. Metadata recovery is something different. HP has purchased almost 100,000 CDs of a consumer-oriented diagnostic that they bundle with business class PCs, which puts things in perspective. I've written firmware for RAID controllers, and dozens of companies slap their names on RAID configurators that I wrote. I published one of the first S.M.A.R.T. diagnostic products back in 1998, but it really didn't ship until 1999.

(I think it was the first that supported SCSI, but can't prove it. here is a writeup by a Ziff Davis from the web archive about that package that was written almost 10 years ago http://web.archive.o...2391076,00.html

Heck, some of the manufactures call me when they have certain problems, and a fair number of OEMs VARs, and people in the disk drive testing business (like some who process RMAs for Dell) use my code.

So enough about me, Have I earned at least a little bit of credibility? (P.S. I don't mean to be arrogant, and I apologize if I have presented myself in that way. Rather I wish to point out that I do know what I am talking about, and well, chances are good that I'm the big dog here when it comes to disk technology).

http://www.santools.com is my company, and I wrote vast majority of the code.

Edited by dlethe, 26 January 2009 - 08:49 AM.


#1019
jaclaz

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are you AlanM or BradC in disguise??


Not actually that secret "identity":
http://storagesecrets.org/2/

The purpose of this site is to provide a forum for users to exchange information about their storage subsystems. The site is owned and maintained by David A. Lethe, of SANtools, Inc.


Basically it seems, from this:
http://storagesecret...-overhyped-fud/

that the site should be called hxxp://teasing_about_storage_secrets-that_I_know_but_wont_reveal.org

With reference to this:
http://storagesecrets.org/2/

Please help me design this sight right the first time! What do you like? What do you hate? How can I make it better, and how should it be arranged. I could really use some help on layout, especially when it comes to content that falls under multiple categories. Be brutal, but keep the contents rated P.G.


First suggestion that comes to mind is that, although I understand perfectly the problem with NDA's, I simply hate people telling me (or anyone else):

You are WRONG, DEADLY WRONG, but I won't prove it, as I am under a NDA. Here is some teasing to show you (without actually telling you anything useful) how I have an advantage on you.


My personal opinion is that should have Seagate managed more professionally and quickly the issues arisen and solved the problem timingly, everything would have been cool.
Once that the damage is done, their only way out is to publish some (if not all) the actual reasons why that happened and public excuses to all their customers affected.
The more they try to keep things secret, the more some cunning user will dig in the matter and possibly find and publish something that should not be (for security reasons).


jaclaz

#1020
poolcarpet

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Great, you are big dog I guess. So you would be well equipped to understand that at least 100+ failures (working fine - reboot - bam! it disappears) around the same time just cannot be a hardware problem. it's only the tip of the iceberg, as you've mentioned - many others may have just RMAed the drives.

Those who came here made the biggest mistake any user can make - placing important data on a hard disk that is not RAID protected and with no backups. That I admit is my problem.

But also do understand that they biggest problem we have with Seagate is how they handled this - arrogantly censoring our threads/messages and just denying the problem despite many people hitting the same problem around the same time.

You credentials looked solid, so stop spoiling it by defending Seagate's actions of deleting threads and how they handled this. I am from the computing industry as well, and I am fully aware that there is no firmware with bugs, no hardware that does not fail. But I am also very very aware that customer service is also very important, although not legally required by Seagate.


Nope, I actually write disk testing software for storage subsystem manufacturers. I do not sell any hardware, or do I sell 3rd-party software. On rare situations, I fix disk drives for friends and families, but my company only does data recovery for certain RAID controllers that lose their metadata. We do not fix or repair disk drives. Metadata recovery is something different. HP has purchased almost 100,000 CDs of a consumer-oriented diagnostic that they bundle with business class PCs, which puts things in perspective. I've written firmware for RAID controllers, and dozens of companies slap their names on RAID configurators that I wrote. I published one of the first S.M.A.R.T. diagnostic products back in 1998, but it really didn't ship until 1999.

(I think it was the first that supported SCSI, but can't prove it. here is a writeup by a Ziff Davis from the web archive about that package that was written almost 10 years ago http://web.archive.o...2391076,00.html

Heck, some of the manufactures call me when they have certain problems, and a fair number of OEMs VARs, and people in the disk drive testing business (like some who process RMAs for Dell) use my code.

So enough about me, Have I earned at least a little bit of credibility? (P.S. I don't mean to be arrogant, and I apologize if I have presented myself in that way. Rather I wish to point out that I do know what I am talking about, and well, chances are good that I'm the big dog here when it comes to disk technology).

http://www.santools.com is my company, and I wrote vast majority of the code.



#1021
mikesw

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http://www.santools.com is my company, and I wrote vast majority of the code.


Yep! he's the one that wrote the article on storagesecrets.com

David A. Lethe, of SANtools, Inc.

Perhaps, one should ask what the software/firmware bug count is per product you have written.
I hate buggy software and firmware and yes I've written software and firmware too.

Seagate has admitted they've known about this problem since the early 1990's. It's very unacceptable
to release and keep releasing products with a known problem. Yes, it was explained by seagate tech
support that it was a race condition in firmware.

If you advocate that a few bugs are ok and is part of business, please detail all commercial software and
hardware products you and your company perform services for so I and the rest of us can avoid your
products. Seagate and any other manufacturer that delivers a known faulty product should be liable
for negligence. It's not to hard to sue to get the source code and have an outside person analyze the
bugs that the vendors hide. See the case on the breath analyzer and voting machines that the courts
now have required them to release regardless of trade secret or proprietary code. Beaware that in
some countries, US law doesn't apply and if faulty products are sold there I'm sure they can prevent
the further sale of these products. Hope, the companies bottom line survives. Numerous manufacturers
hope the warranty expires before a hardware or software bug shows itself. This is attitude is unacceptable.
Look at the lemon law for automobiles. There should be one for software and hardware manufacturers.
RMA'ng the drive is a cop-out. And no, seagate only replaces the drive, they don't fix it and send you back
your original drive. If the hard drives were designed properly, then data recovery companies such as
yours wouldn't be needed. This will be case once solid state devices takeover disk drive manufactures
and the amount of hardware and firmware is less thus reducing the chance of failure.


Unless you personally wrote the firmware for these seagate drives, you have no leg to stand on except
assumed speculation.

BTW, if your companies products had as much problems as seagate, what is your companies policy to
rectify the situation. If it is to ignore the problem, then you will have issues. I and just about everyone else
will not have a problem of informing the technical publishing companies about your products and services.
In the end, the last person to be damaged will be you and your company.

Please provide known information on your faulty products so that I may start contacting the tech websites
about it right away and let everyone else know !!!!
:realmad:

Edited by mikesw, 26 January 2009 - 09:40 AM.


#1022
dlethe

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Come on, I told you all you need to know except the diagnostic bit pattern, and the offset for the 16 or 32-bit number that must be saved in the offset at the moment the drive is powered down that creates the bricking effect. Do you want that too? (Nobody has part of this info, for obvious reasons, but if you search the web, you can find reference to the magic number. Somebody at the TH site posted it yesterday (So if you want to do some detective work go for it).

The most you got from anybody else is a convoluted problem with firmware, which made it look as if everybody is vulnerable. Why do you think Seagate wants serial numbers to see if the disk is a candidate for the problem? If the firmware rev was the only factor, then all you would need is the date code to see if you have a vulnerable disk. Seagate would also be able to write an active-x plug-in to let people test their disk drives online. Instead you have to run a windows EXE and give them your serial number. Common sense is if problem was easy to identify, then they wouldn't go to all the effort to require users to run an executable. It would take all of an hour to write a plug-in to ID the disks.

Use some common sense here, factor in how many 'cudas that Seagate ships in a year, and tell me how many millions of disk drives SHOULD be failing if this is a firmware bug that affects all disks running this particular firmware. Seagate is on a 5-year run rate to ship 1,000,000,000 disk drives ANNUALLY by 2014. If the drive problem was as big as you say it is, then they would have caught it in QC. The problem is a purple squirrel (sorry about the yankee slang -- it means incredibly rare).

If the bricking issue is as big as you claim to be, then EMC, Dell, IBM, HP, Arrow, Apple, and all the others would have made press releases saying they were signing Fujitsu a long time ago. Where are these press releases?

Now here is the dirty little secret. High volume direct customers get bug reports in advance of firmware releases. Draw your own conclusions whether or not you believe consumer-oriented companies such as Apple are more interested in keeping seagate than their devoted customer base. Would Seagate dare to NOT tell Apple, Dell, HP what is going on? Unlikely. Would Apple take such a risk? Less likely? Would Apple and the others assess the risk to their customer base knowing full details and determine that the number of affected disks is statistically insignficant? You tell me.

I am sorry that I have not told you all that I know. Frankly, I have better things to do. It is just that this consipiracy nonsense has gone too far, and somebody has to set the record straight. Off to work, I have a company to run now.

#1023
jaclaz

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Just to add a bit of fuel :ph34r: , wouldn't this statement:
http://storagesecret...overy-services/

In my opionion, your disk died due to a mechanical failure, and not any firmware bug.


be, to say the least, unsupported by the evidence of the number of reported successes? :whistle:

Or am I misunderstanding it's meaning? :unsure:

jaclaz

#1024
icefloe01

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Come on, I told you all you need to know except the diagnostic bit pattern, and the offset for the 16 or 32-bit number that must be saved in the offset at the moment the drive is powered down that creates the bricking effect. Do you want that too? (Nobody has part of this info, for obvious reasons, but if you search the web, you can find reference to the magic number...)



320

#1025
jaclaz

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320


Not actually the "offset".

The "320" is not at all "very hidden", being on slashdot since a few days:
http://it.slashdot.o...9/01/21/0052236

Now that the problem, one way or the other, has come to the open, and mostly thanks to Gradius2 and a few other members of the board :thumbup, we can see the light at the end of the tunnel :), notwithstanding the poor way Seagate managed the issue, I would like to spend a few words against the argument of "few cases out of millions drives produced/sold":
There are actually only TWO possibilities:
  • it's actually a case of few tens or hundreds out of millions, and if this is the case providing recovery would cost proportionally next to nothing to Seagate and should have been offered since day one
  • there are more drives affected than those listed here on MSFN, in which case a public announcement and recall campaign would have been more than justified

Though of course in this particular case there is no fear of danger to health or risk of injuries something like this would have been justified, as I see it.:
http://www.cpsc.gov/...ML97/97175.html

Because of 3 (THREE) incidents reported in the US, and probably a few more in other countries, the firm recalled some 120,000 Juice Extractors

The recall was published on newspapers all around the world and, far from provoking a damage to the firm it actually bettered it's public image.

Even if the reason for the (few? :unsure:) failures was still under investigation, simply instructing people at technical support, forum and/or call center to reply something like:

We know of this problem, our engineers are developing a solution for it, but you will have to wait a few days, please leave us an e-mail address, you will be notified as soon as such a fix is available, with instructions on how to apply it, by yourself or through our support.


Would have been more than enough to keep a number of enraged customers calm for the time needed.

And again if the problem is about a few hundreds drives, Seagate could have afforded sending a technician in a limousine to the customer home or office and apply the fix.

Still generally speaking there are two ways to avoid "panic" and keep customers satisfied:
  • deny the evidence
  • tell the truth, provide remedies and offer excuses

In this era of communication, choice 1. above is, besides immoral, unrealistic.

jaclaz




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