Gradius2

The Solution for Seagate 7200.11 HDDs

4,868 posts in this topic

I can't see (or wait) the time when 1TB (and more) SSDs would be cheaper.

So that WHEN one of those will fail you will have even LESS chances to recover data from them? :unsure::w00t:

We add here to the existing "internal translation" and "G-list" possible issues also the SSD brand new ones, such as "wear leveling" and "garbage collecting". :ph34r:

jaclaz

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So far, every storage system can fail. Even Johnny Mnemonic's brain.

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So far, every storage system can fail. Even Johnny Mnemonic's brain.

For NO apparent reason :whistle: :

captainobvious.jpg

jaclazDUCKEMOTICON_FINAL.gif

jaclaz

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Hi

Sorry to bother again but i wanted to ask what does exactly do the last step for fixing the BSY bug. Because ive read the last step and it says:

Partition regeneration:

F3 T>m0,2,2,,,,,22 (enter)

Does this format the hhd? How can i recover the data after doing that?

Thanks in advance

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You shouldn't normally need to. Normally the data should be already there after the command and reboot. No need for an additional action.

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Thank you for this information, I managed to restore a clients hard drive using it :)

Though I found the instructions on this page a little easier to follow and apply (not sure who the author is though).

https://sites.google.com/site/seagatefix/Home

They suggested using a small piece of cardboard to break the connection between the PCB and the head contacts during the spin down phase. I removed the 2 screws near and to the bottom left of the head contacts to allow the cardboard to slide in/out. I also loosened the long screws near the corner edges. After I performed the spin down I then gently removed the cardboard and carefully inserted just the one the screw near the head contacts (helped to use a magnetic tip to position the screw), as that seemed to be the simplest and most efficient way to do it.

I had the "Error 1009 DETSEC 0000600" when trying to spin the drive up. A quick fix for me was to simply place a piece of cardboard on top of the PCB (to shield from any electrical discharge) near where the head contacts are and apply some gentle pressure with my finger then try the spin up command again. That allowed me to restore the drive, though cleaning the contacts can also help prevent any further problems.

I hope that helps.

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Though I found the instructions on this page a little easier to follow and apply (not sure who the author is though).

https://sites.google.com/site/seagatefix/Home

That guide, though good, is NOT the recommended one, which is this one (as sticked AND pointed to in the READ ME FIRST):

http://www.mapleleafmountain.com/seagatebrick.html

which is a more complete one.

If you need to use a piece of cardboard to press down the PCB to obtain spin up it means any (or more than one) of three things:

  1. you used the cardboard on the head contacts AND the cardboard was a bit too thick
  2. the head contacts were not properly cleaned
  3. you failed to re-tighten appropriately the screws near the contacts

The workaround you used is potentially a VERY dangerous one :ph34r: , what you had was a "bad" contact that you "patched" (possibly only temporarily) by pressing a bit on the PCB.

That PCB should be disassembled, contacts cleaned and the "springy effect" of the contacts on the disk be verified, then all screws re-tightened firmly before further use of the disk.

jaclaz

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It is said that what you don't know can't hurt you. Now you made me worry again, jaclaz. I fear I have might tightened the screws too hard. Also, the contacts between PCB, head and motor were so corroded, I wonder how it works. But it does. :wacko:

Edited by Phaenius
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It is said that what you don't know can't hurt you. Now you made me worry again, jaclaz. I fear I have might tightened the screws too hard. Also, the contacts between PCB, head and motor were so corroded, I wonder how it works. But it does. :wacko:

JFYI:

http://www.crcind.com/wwwcrc/tds/TKC3%20KONTAKT60.PDF

http://www.crcind.com/wwwcrc/tds/TKC3%20KONTAKTWL.PDF

http://www.crcind.com/wwwcrc/tds/TKC3%20KONTAKT61.PDF

jaclaz

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Too expensive. How about this, found at a local store at about 2.75 euros ?

KontaktU.jpg

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I find difficult reading the specs from a (BTW lousy) picture of the spray can.

BUT the actual info from the manufacturer:

http://www.agchemia.pl/OnlineShop.aspx

KONTAKT U

a blend of solvents for removing fat, used for cleaning electronic assemblies and electric contacts, removes fat, dirt, old greases and oils, silicones, sulfides and oxides dissolved with KONTAKT S, and all substances remaining after soldering (including rosin).

Aerosol cans: 60ml, 300 ml

KONTAKT S

a preparation for removing oxides and sulfides from electric contacts and for providing protection against corrosion, ensures non-obstructed electricity flow especially in the case of oxidized or worn contacts, can be used in audio products -high and low-frequency, electronic industry and in other places where clean contacts are required.

Aerosol cans: 60ml, 300 ml

Clears how that is as well a three product cycle:

  1. de-oxidation <- CRC KONTACT 60 or AG KONTACT S
  2. cleaning <- CRC KONTACT WL or AG KONTACT U
  3. protect <- CRC KONTACT 61 or AG ???

jaclaz

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They'll do anything just to add a letter and taking you more money from your wallet. Same applies to compressed air spray cans. I found one with about 3 euros. I read all sort of theories about them as well.

I intended to clean the contacts with this:

article_778_1091_orig.jpg

Universal lotion. :thumbup

Edited by Phaenius
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Sure :), it's your contacts that are corroded.

Please look in a dictionary corroded:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/corroded

and oxidized:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/oxidized

they are seemingly NOT synonyms of dirty:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dirty

You may also want to try some turmeric on them :yes: :

http://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2011/08/08/curry-spice-for-cuts-and-bruises/

jaclaz

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No, that curry spice will only add more granules. Don't think all that cleaning substances are that different. I'm sure a lot of it is just marketing propaganda.

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Don't think all that cleaning substances are that different. I'm sure a lot of it is just marketing propaganda.

Basically on a topic over which you have no competence nor experience whatever, you assume your beliefs (which may well be applicable to a number of other products/procedures/fields, of course :)) on marketing hype over the advice given by a self-proclaimed expert stranger on the internet?

This is very good :thumbup .

You don't want to clean your electronic devices? Good. Then don't do it. :no:

You want to clean some contacts with "Universal lotion"? Good, then just do it. :yes:

As long as you don't whine, that's fine.

You were worried about those contacts were corroded.

A cycle of treatment to hopefully re-condition them as much as possible and prolong their life was suggested to you, of course a similar (other make/brand) cycle of treatment will have the same or a very similar effect.

One only of the steps in the cycle won't have the same effect.

One only of the steps in the cycle additionally using a different (possibly completely unsuited for it) substance won't as well work and, as a matter of fact may make things worse.

Do whatever you see fit.

jaclaz

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