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Gradius2

The Solution for Seagate 7200.11 HDDs

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The point is that we don't know much about how the whole thing works.

Updating the firmware is not "to be avoided at all costs", in the "normal" "common" BSY/LBA0 issue is simply NOT useful and  unneeded, but being anyway a risky operation (always, but particularly when the disk drive is not working properly for *unknown* reason) it is only advised after having recovered data, when, in the worst case, it will re-brick the drive (possibly in such a way that it is not recoverable) but since the priority (recovering the data) went fine, it wouldn't matter.

In case of a LBA0 issue it won't probably do anything, in case of BSY the disk is not recognized so the update cannot be performed.

That "strange" condition of a SX15 firmware on a drive marked SD15 (and 12CC4 error) you have is seemingly not a common one, so we don't have any other report that I can remember. :(

jaclaz

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On 7/21/2017 at 9:01 AM, jaclaz said:

The point is that we don't know much about how the whole thing works.

Updating the firmware is not "to be avoided at all costs", in the "normal" "common" BSY/LBA0 issue is simply NOT useful and  unneeded, but being anyway a risky operation (always, but particularly when the disk drive is not working properly for *unknown* reason) it is only advised after having recovered data, when, in the worst case, it will re-brick the drive (possibly in such a way that it is not recoverable) but since the priority (recovering the data) went fine, it wouldn't matter.

In case of a LBA0 issue it won't probably do anything, in case of BSY the disk is not recognized so the update cannot be performed.

That "strange" condition of a SX15 firmware on a drive marked SD15 (and 12CC4 error) you have is seemingly not a common one, so we don't have any other report that I can remember. :(

jaclaz

7

I definitely have the BSY error (and I think the LBA0 error as well). I HAVE NOT been able to recover the data yet using the "safe and tested" methods.

I can get it to "spin down", reconnect the motor, and actually spin up. At this point I plug in the SATA cable, the OS recognizes the drive, installs driver, and reports no partitions on the disk, but only for a short time. I am powering with a second power supply to maintain power to the drive when computer is shut down.

What I will try next:

  1. get drive to spin up
  2. shut down computer with drive still powered/spinning
  3. turn on computer and enter BIOS
  4. if drive is recognized in BIOS, attempt to boot from firmware update CD

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Hi everyone, thanks for all the valuable information here - highly useful.

I  followed the steps all the way through and got the below message:

Max Wr Retries = 00, Max Rd Retries = 00, Max ECC T-Level = 14, Max Certify Rewrite Retries = 00C8 

User Partition Format Successful - Elapsed Time 0 mins 00 secs

Note that 'Elapsed time 0 mins and 00 secs', unlike like the one that everyone else got that says 'Elapsed time 0 mins and 05 secs'

I am also missing this line (the line that is supposed to be in between the two above:

User Partition Format 10% complete, Zone 00, Pass 00, LBA 00004339, ErrCode 00000080, Elapsed Time 0 mins 05 secs 

Now the first time I completed the process and restarted the PC with the SATA cable connected to the affect HDD (which does not have an OS installed), my bios automatically went into a screen after initial boot up that was similar to it checking and repairing a drive - this took around 10mins. I then logged into windows and my drive was there!

I was so excited that I tried to see if all my files were still available. I must have clicked on files too quickly and an error popped up and then the HDD disappeared from windows - unfortunately I was not sharp enough to get a screen print of the message.

Since then I've been going through the entire process again and again. Sometimes it my bios detects it with the correct size, but most of the time it doesn't detect it. Even when the bios does detect it, windows doesn't after I logged in.

I've also noticed that so far every time it's appeared detected by my bios, its because I done the following:

1) completed BSY solution

2) disconnect hdd, turn off hdd power, turn off pc

3) turn on pc, log into windows (no drive detected)

4) restart pc, go into BIOS and the drive is there!

And then when I log back into windows its gone again...

 

please help me!!!

Edited by dznuk90

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Which contacts did you insulate?

i.e. motor or heads ones?

Or did you completely remove the PCB?

In some cases the contacts between the PCB and the disk may be "irregular", in wich case a good idea may be to use a pencil eraser to clean the contacts and/or use a (teeny-tiny quantity of) electric contact cleaner and/or (sometimes needed) tighten a little bit more the screws.

Also, do not underestimate the possibility that the actual SATA cable is bad (the SATA connector is re-known to have been poorly engineered and to come loose after a finite number of insertions/removals).

First thing (after having made sure that contacts between PCB and disk are clean would be to try anothe SATA cable, new and/or surely working, and try the disk on another machine (most probably not your case, but you never know which kind of mess can be a Registry and what issues it can create) or use (on the same machine) a definitely "clean" environment, such as a PE or a Live Linux distro.

More generally, you don't really want to access the volume(s) on the disk (on Windows, say via Explorer) you actually should be ready to image the disk (of course if it can beseen as \\.\PhysicalDrive), it is not uncommon that while the disk (the \\.\PhysicalDrive) is "revived"  *something* is stil amiss/corrupted, preventing the volumes in it to be mounted and assigned a drive letter.

Once you will have managed to make an image of the \\.\PhysicalDrive, then it will be possible to (hopefully) check it and recover the volumes or the files.

jaclaz

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Thanks for the quick reply! Really didn't expect it, much appreciated.

Not sure which one is which, but think the motor is the slightly diagonal contact - I didn't insulate this one, but insulated the other one with a card (and then pulled it out before entering the U command).

Only removed the PCB at the very beginning to get the card underneath, then lightly screwed it back, before fully tightening it after I pulled the card out. I've tried using a small bit of nail polish remover on both the head and the motor contacts to clean it - and lightly scratching off what appeared to be scorch marks to bring back the shine. 

SATA cable is quite new too so doubt it can be this, but will try a new one tomorrow. I have a live Ubuntu USB stick so will boot from that tomorrow at the same time with the new cable.

How to I make an image of the \\.\PhysicalDrive?

BTW I just tried again and now its in the Windows 10 'scanning and repairing' screen. Might be because I manually hard shut down the computer from the last report, or might be its detected the drive - its scanning and repairing drive F right now and last time when I first thought I fixed it, it was assigned drive letter F before the error came up. Fingers crossed maybe?

Edited by dznuk90

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It is difficult to say.

The issue with letting the "revived" device be "autodetected" is the risk that the automatic repair provisions (chkdsk via autochk or similar) may make things worse (it doesn't normally happen :), but you never know :dubbio:).

As a matter of fact, presuming that the volume was NTFS formatted, it is not like there are that many ways (besides CHKDSK) to repair the filesystem, but it is always preferrable to have a RAW copy before letting the CHKDSK run, and in any case it is normally a good idea to run it in stages, the first time without the /F parameter, just to check what it says without (almost) writing anything to the volume.

To make a RAW image you need (besides a disk with a volume with enough capacity to hold the whole disk size and with a suitable filesystem such as NTFS or EXT2/3/4, etc.) *any* dd-like tool, see:

https://www.linuxquestions.org/linux/answers/Applications_GUI_Multimedia/How_To_Do_Eveything_With_DD

since here you are dealing with a possibly damaged/unresponsive disk, it would make sense to use a dedicated program such as (Linux) dd_rescue:

http://www.garloff.de/kurt/linux/ddrescue/

which - mind you - is not ddrescue:

http://www.gnu.org/software/ddrescue/ddrescue.html

Under Windows for making the image (or chunks of it) DataRescueDD:

http://www.datarescue.com/photorescue/v3/drdd.htm

is usually advised, otherwise I would personally go for DMDE (while this is a "full" data recovery too that implies some understanding of the matter the imaging part is simple enough for the common user):

http://dmde.com/

that has also a command line Linux version (which I never personally tested and that most probably is complex in usage).

jaclaz

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi,

i have got a Seagate Barracuda 3000GB (ST3000DM001) which died the other day, and since i recovered some bricked routers via serial port, i hoped this also works for my hdd.
there is no clicking or anything, just not available for the bios.

is there a pdf or something where the pictures of the first post are still there?

 

greets

 

Ok news here, i managed to get a serial cable attached and this is the output, when i plug in the power-cable:

Boot 0x40M
 Spin Up
 FAIL  Servo Op=0100 Resp=0003
 0100 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
 ResponseFrame 1F40 0000 0000 7FC0 0008 0000 0000 0000 FBE7 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 8F45 85CC D27D 877D B67C 2D32 975C FB57 7B47 5F5A 0000 007F 0004 0000 FFF7 0004 0000
 FAIL  Servo Op=0100 Resp=0003
 0100 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
 ResponseFrame 2AC0 0000 0000 7FC0 0008 0000 0000 0000 FBE7 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 8F45 85CC D27D 877D B67C 2D32 975C FB57 7B47 5F5A 0000 007F 0004 0000 FFF7 0004 0000

 

so, there is no help for my hdd is there?

Edited by NoBuggingPlz

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It seems like your case has nothing to do with the specific failure(s)  discussed in this thread,

You are seemingly the unlucky owner of one of the worst hard disks of all times :w00t::ph34r: :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ST3000DM001

reportedly those drives simply fail, after some time, in the highest percentages ever recorded. :(

These failures can - in some cases only - be repaired by professionals, no  DIY available,

jaclaz

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