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kingsc

Connecting to Cisco devices with a Rollover Cable

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Hi all,

So I'm relatively new to networking.

I was reading a Net+ study guide and read that by reversing the pins on the ends of a ethernet cable you can create a crossover cable used for Cisco devices. Can you use this by itself to hyperterminal into a Cisco 1800 router? I created the cable and verified the pinout is correct with a cable tester but I'm a little confused on how to setup the HT connection.

From what I've read I should select "Direct to COM1", which directs that it's not a dialup connection but a local one, but I don't have that option; there is no "Direct to COM1".

Am I going about this completely wrong? I can still connect via a console cable and DB9 adapter but was curious if I didn't have to use this and could just use the modified ethernet cable, thanks.

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The console connection uses a RJ45, but it is designed to connect to a serial port. By connecting it to your NIC, you're trying to talk to it with a different 'language'. If the router has an ethernet port with an IP and your NIC has an IP in the same broadcast domain, you should be able to telnet to it. A rollover cable and a crossover cable are different. A crossover generally goes from 568A to 568B ends. I believe rollover ends are pinned in reverse of each other. Of course Cisco's rollover is a DB9 on one end and a RJ45 on the other. The crossover cable is generally used for interconnecting network devices. Most newer equipment auto-senses, so you usually don't need them any more.

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The console connection uses a RJ45, but it is designed to connect to a serial port. By connecting it to your NIC, you're trying to talk to it with a different 'language'. If the router has an ethernet port with an IP and your NIC has an IP in the same broadcast domain, you should be able to telnet to it. A rollover cable and a crossover cable are different. A crossover generally goes from 568A to 568B ends. I believe rollover ends are pinned in reverse of each other. Of course Cisco's rollover is a DB9 on one end and a RJ45 on the other. The crossover cable is generally used for interconnecting network devices. Most newer equipment auto-senses, so you usually don't need them any more.

Ah good to know thank you. Yeah the rollover is just a reversal of pins on one side and the other; diff from a crossover. I was wondering if I could avoid using a serial cable just out of curiosity. Thanks for the info.

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