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Cleartype - do you like it?


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Poll: Do you like cleartype? (40 member(s) have cast votes)

Do you like cleartype?

  1. Voted Yes (38 votes [88.37%])

    Percentage of vote: 88.37%

  2. No (5 votes [11.63%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.63%

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#26
JustShootIt

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I like it enabled on LCD displays, but not on CRT monitors.


True. ClearType is intended only for LCD anyway, which is what they assume (correctly) most people have now.
 
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#27
Svenne

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I have Cleartype turned on for LCD monitors, and off for CRTs. Most people who thinks it looks blurry on LCDs might have it improperly configured; some monitors have the pixels in the opposite order eg. Blue-Green-Red instead of the normal Red-Green-Blue.
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#28
dbanie

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yes i prefer cleartype :thumbup for me it makes the text its easier to read

#29
meowing

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As I wrote earlier: Cleartype is post-processing of fonts that aren't good to begin with (or they wouldn't require cleartype). It's not something you should rely on, as it is not a reliable standard.

Font smoothing is ugly blurring in my eyes. Cleartype never does it the way it should be done, or I prefer hard lines over soft edges. Also, NOT being able to see where it goes wrong in fonts would be my preference over software regulated changes in displaying them.

#30
Ex_Brit

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As I wrote earlier: Cleartype is post-processing of fonts that aren't good to begin with (or they wouldn't require cleartype). It's not something you should rely on, as it is not a reliable standard.

Font smoothing is ugly blurring in my eyes. Cleartype never does it the way it should be done, or I prefer hard lines over soft edges. Also, NOT being able to see where it goes wrong in fonts would be my preference over software regulated changes in displaying them.



Whatever needs improving I couldn't do without Cleartype on my Samsung XL2370.

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#31
CoffeeFiend

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Cleartype is post-processing of fonts that aren't good to begin with (or they wouldn't require cleartype)

Utter nonsense. Perhaps you don't understand how anti-aliasing works, or how LCD's sub-pixels make up their pixels (rather different than CRTs). What you're saying is 100% the same as saying "this line at a 45 degree angle only needs anti-aliasing because it's badly designed". It simply doesn't work that way.

It makes use of the subpixels to anti-alias fonts FAR better than the old grayscale method which could only do anti-aliasing at the pixel level (more precise/sharper -- and actually a better representation of the font's bezier curves). That alone is quite nice, but the other thing I personally appreciate quite a bit (as a typography lover/geek) is the much improved spacing between characters (far more precise kerning) as you're not forced to stick to actual pixel boundaries for placement (3x more precise, aligning to sub-pixels) which looks fantastic IMO.

It's not something you should rely on, as it is not a reliable standard

It's not what we would call a standard in the first place ;) But it does consistently looks great IMO. And the big name foundries (like Adobe) are also behind those technologies and some even have their own implementation of it (e.g. Adobe's CoolType). You'd think they know a thing or two about type ;) Even Microsoft is quite knowledgeable about fonts in general -- they even designed the OpenType format (the "new" standard) with Adobe and they have came up with several nice fonts over the years too (calibri, candara, segoe, verdana, cambria, trebuchet, etc)
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