MagicAndre1981

How to speed up boot process under Windows Vista or Windows 7

673 posts in this topic

The Installer updates the System-PATH variable. This is only updated after reboot.

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I tried to do as your instruction, but it displayed:

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]

Copyright © 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

C:\Windows\system32>xbootmgr -trace boot -prepSystem -verboseReadyBoot

'xbootmgr' is not recognized as an internal or external command,

operable program or batch file.

C:\Windows\system32>

Please let know what happened

thanks

untitled.png

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I am sorry for ignoring the first sentence :D

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It really takes time when preparing, but I see a significant improvement when Windows starting! About 30s is reduced (from 2' to 1'30", it includes the time for starting up some services as Gadgets, ...)

Thanks

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hello, i've used the method described in your post, and obtained a reduction from 120k to 80k ms. is it possible to decrease this even further? I've looked through the event viewier.. I did not see anything that I can shave seconds from.

Thanks for the awesome guide!

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make a full trace:

and give me the trace file.

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Hi,

timing bootDoneViaExplorer="49970" bootDoneViaPostBoot="116070"

Your Windows needs 50s to boot to the desktop and 106 seconds to boot completely.

 <interval name="PreSMSS" startTime="0" endTime="8469" duration="8469">

The PreSMSS subphase begins when the kernel is invoked. During this subphase, the kernel initializes data structures and components. It also starts the PnP manager, which initializes the BOOT_START drivers that were loaded during the OSLoader phase.

When the PnP manager detects a device, it loads and initializes the device’s drivers

Your takes 8.5s, this is ok.

<interval name="SMSSInit" startTime="8469" endTime="22670" duration="14200">

The SMSSInit subphase begins when the kernel passes control to the session manager process (Smss.exe). During this subphase, the system initializes the registry, loads and starts the devices and drivers that are not marked BOOT_START, and starts the subsystem processes. SMSSInit ends when control is passed to Winlogon.exe.

this takes 14s which is bit too long. I can see that the time difference between the both csrss.exe is 4s which means it takes 4s to initialize the graphic card driver. Are you using the latest driver or your NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285?

<interval name="WinlogonInit" startTime="22670" endTime="40805" duration="18134">

The WinLogonInit subphase begins when SMSSInit completes and starts Winlogon.exe. During WinLogonInit, the user logon screen appears, the service control manager starts services, and Group Policy scripts run. WinLogonInit ends when the Explorer process starts.

your takes 18s, which is also too long.

I found this:

- <notification type="Logon" sessionId="1" startTime="29088" endTime="38339" duration="9251">
<subscriber name="Profiles" startTime="29088" endTime="38332" duration="9244" />

So loading the profile takes too long. To see what happens there, download ProcessMonitor and activate bootlogging. Make a new boottrace with xbootmgr and reboot. Start ProcessMonitor again and save the data into a PML file. Zip both files (xbootmgr and PML file) and upload it.

 <interval name="ExplorerInit" startTime="40805" endTime="49970" duration="9164">

The ExplorerInit subphase begins when Explorer.exe starts. During ExplorerInit, the system creates the desktop window manager (DWM) process, which initializes the desktop and displays it for the first time.

this takes 9.2 seconds. This is also a bit too long.

Applications—such as antivirus programs or application servers—that are created during service start in this or previous phases can consume CPU resources during ExplorerInit. Some services might not be started yet when ExplorerInit is complete.

I can see that you use MSE/Commodo which causes a high CPU usage. remove both and see if it it faster.

<interval name="PostExplorerPeriod" startTime="49970" endTime="116070" duration="66100">

During PostBoot, Windows examines the entries in the various Run and RunOnce keys (Run, RunOnce, RunOnceEx, RunServices, and so on) in the registry and the Startup folder in the file system, and then starts the listed applications.

So starting all startup applications takes too long (56seconds). So use AutoRuns and try to remove all unneeded applications like the google and JAVA update checker.

Edited by MagicAndre1981
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90s are still a bit to high, make a boot trace (http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=140247), zip and and upload it. Maybe I can find something to reduce the time again.

I just make a boot trace following your intruction. When computer starting, the "dead green screen" appeared. I cannot log in the computer. I have to use repair dick several times to fix "startup ...".

Please see the attachment file!

THank you so much

My link

PS: It seems the Sidebar takes much time!

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timing bootDoneViaExplorer="45239" bootDoneViaPostBoot="138339" 

Your Windows takes 45 to boot to the desktop and 128s to boot completely.

<interval name="PreSMSS" startTime="0" endTime="5088" duration="5088">

The PreSMSS subphase begins when the kernel is invoked. During this subphase, the kernel initializes data structures and components. It also starts the PnP manager, which initializes the BOOT_START drivers that were loaded during the OSLoader phase. When the PnP manager detects a device, it loads and initializes the device’s drivers

This takes 5. Which is ok.

 <interval name="SMSSInit" startTime="5088" endTime="15581" duration="10492">

The SMSSInit subphase begins when the kernel passes control to the session manager process (Smss.exe). During this subphase, the system initializes the registry, loads and starts the devices and drivers that are not marked BOOT_START, and starts the subsystem processes. SMSSInit ends when control is passed to Winlogon.exe.

Provider Name, Task Name, Time (s)
, smss:InitializeRegistry,
, , 5.941076308, win:Start
, , 8.476292276, win:Stop

so initializing of the registry take a bit too long.

<interval name="WinlogonInit" startTime="15581" endTime="29551" duration="13970">

The WinLogonInit subphase begins when SMSSInit completes and starts Winlogon.exe. During WinLogonInit, the user logon screen appears, the service control manager starts services, and Group Policy scripts run. WinLogonInit ends when the Explorer process starts.

from what I can see is that KasperSky service starts too slowly:

serviceTransition name="AVP" group="" transition="start" totalTransitionTimeDelta="32507"

interval name="ExplorerInit" startTime="29551" endTime="45239" duration="15687">

The ExplorerInit subphase begins when Explorer.exe starts. During ExplorerInit, the system creates the desktop window manager (DWM) process, which initializes the desktop and displays it for the first time.

this also takes too long, because of Kaspersky:

Applications—such as antivirus programs or application servers—that are created during service start in this or previous phases can consume CPU resources during ExplorerInit. Some services might not be started yet when ExplorerInit is complete.

- <interval name="PostExplorerPeriod" startTime="45239" endTime="138339" duration="93100">

During PostBoot, Windows examines the entries in the various Run and RunOnce keys (Run, RunOnce, RunOnceEx, RunServices, and so on) in the registry and the Startup folder in the file system, and then starts the listed applications.

Remove the googleupdater and remove the amount of index folders. The Windows Search service also takes too long to start.

I think that Kaspersky is the cause of the slowdown. Remove it.

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Remove the googleupdater and remove the amount of index folders. The Windows Search service also takes too long to start.

I think that Kaspersky is the cause of the slowdown. Remove it.

Thank you indeed. I will remove something as your suggestion. Kaspersky is to protect my computer from internet harmful attacks. So I may have to accept its usage time. This is a contradiction! :-<

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So loading the profile takes too long. To see what happens there, download ProcessMonitor and activate bootlogging. Make a new boottrace with xbootmgr and reboot. Start ProcessMonitor again and save the data into a PML file. Zip both files (xbootmgr and PML file) and upload it.

Hi MagicAndre1981,

here it is. the one with the processmonitor trace. i've updated my graphics driver as you advised, and cleared off some programs that are not needed in autoruns. but i might have to leave comodo and MSE in for now, or i would have no internet security >.<

thanks for the advise thus far! :)

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Thank you indeed. I will remove something as your suggestion. Kaspersky is to protect my computer from internet harmful attacks. So I may have to accept its usage time.

use a different tools (free tool) like Aivra AntiVir and the in Windows included Firewall.

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but i might have to leave comodo and MSE in for now, or i would have no internet security >.<

The cause of the slow login is COMODO (cmdagent.exe) which scans all commands + MSE + you highly fragmented HDD which is used by 100%.

same suggestion like aboto. use Aivra AntiVir + Windows included Firewall and run the optimization again.

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