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WD - PCB replacement + pictures

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33 replies to this topic

#1
CrazyDoctor

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Hi All,

I have this hard drive

http://img168.images....us/i/wd1p.jpg/

http://img687.images....us/i/wd2l.jpg/

On the green PCB two of the chips are brunt (which easily can be seen as burnt).

I want to buy from ebay one of those of hard drives in order to replace the pcb.

What is the correct one?

http://shop.ebay.com...osacat=0&bkBtn=


I think that this is the best match: (not sure)
http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item51916e968d

Many Thanks!


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#2
jaclaz

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That one has a different DCM:
http://www.harddrive...rive-parts.html

Yours is DHNNNT2AHN

The one you linked to is DBRNHT2AAN:

DCM: DBRNHT2AAN

PCB: 2061-701444-700 AD - on the barcode sticker

2060-701444-004 Rev. A on the PCB


There is contrasting info on the DCM last few (3 or 5) digits needing to be the same, but this should apply only for a head swap:
http://forum.hddguru...e-t8951-20.html

Your PCB is 2061-701444-700 AD, so it is matching. :thumbup

jaclaz

#3
CrazyDoctor

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Hi jaclaz,

Many thanks for the informative answer!

So to be sure, even though there are few differences with the numbers of this hard drive, for a pcb swap, this item:
http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item51916e968d

should be a good mutch for my hard drive?

by the way, do you know any other cheaper way to get this pcb?

Best Regards,

#4
jaclaz

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Hi jaclaz,

Many thanks for the informative answer!

So to be sure, even though there are few differences with the numbers of this hard drive, for a pcb swap, this item:
http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item51916e968d

should be a good mutch for my hard drive?

This is what I posted, yes:

Your PCB is 2061-701444-700 AD, so it is matching. :thumbup

If the question is "will the PCB swap work", the answer is "noone can say".

by the way, do you know any other cheaper way to get this pcb?

Define "cheaper", and add to your evaluation "fast", "accurate", then we'll talk about the matter.

As I see it, that price is an awful lot of money :ph34r: for that hard disk, but you should actually kneel down and kiss the ground where the seller has walked :w00t: , as very few people sell hard disks on e-bay giving such a number of details.

You are payng not so much the HD but the time of the guy to make a proper ad, compare with buying a lot of undescribed HD's for a few bucks to find that they are not the right one or taking several days of correspondence with the seller to make sure it is actually the right PCB.

What these guys do is to buy lots of HD's then catalog each one properly.
You can do the same, you may save some dollars, but if you are dealing with data recovery, time is one of the key factors.

Following are another few chaps that sells PCB's:
http://www.ioffer.co...ng/hddsolutions
http://stores.ebay.com/Softcom
http://stores.ebay.c...arts-Specialist
http://stores.ebay.c...puter-Recycling

(just first four results of a search - no intention whatsoever to promote any of them with which I never had any contact)

Hint ;):
search on e-bay for "PCB Western Digital" (without quotes)


jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 31 March 2010 - 10:30 AM.


#5
submix8c

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re - your other "cross-post"...

I doubt you'll be able to replace just the "burnt components" as
1 - you need to know specifically what they are (and yours are FUBAR!)
2 - you would need to find a supplier after you KNOW (good luck finding them)
3 - you would have to de-solder/re-solder (good luck with that)

If you have valuable data on that HDD, you'll probably have to either -
1 - follow jaclaz' advice (get the exact PCB replacement)
2 - send it to a "recovery" and/or "repair" company

Other than that, there's no other (known) solution (trust me, I'm a Certified Electronics Technician) sans "Magic Wand".

HTH

edit (from "wdc.com") -

Model: WD5000AAKS. Price: US$64.99 In stock

So, unless data, just buy another. If data, get the correct PCB and carefully "swap" it.

Edited by submix8c, 31 March 2010 - 10:05 AM.

Someday the tyrants will be unthroned... Jason "Jay" Chasteen; RIP, bro!

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#6
VideoRipper

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Hi CD :hello:

I'm amazed how you're trying to repair all kinds of HDD-PCB, without (by the looks of it)
having any electronics background.

Don't get me wrong, I always support (other) hobbyist, but I wonder whether you would be
able to fix it, if you don't even know that mentioned parts are an SMD resistor and diode. :unsure:

Because of the images being out of focus, it's impossible to see what the exact values are
that are needed, but you can get both parts easilly at any electronics (web) parts-store,
like Farnell, DigiKey, Conrad and many others.

Apart from that, you always have to ask yourself: how did a certain part blew up itself?
Electronic parts never blow up without a reason (like, for instance, wear and tear), so
there are great chances that when you replace a part, it will blow out again as soon as
you apply power to the repaired device in question.

...AND: those SMD components are visibly defective: you'll never know what else has been
blown up (internally) that doesn't show :angry:

Also, don't forget most of the time it's not worth the time and money to repair something
nowadays, unless it's something of high value or, in this case, valuable data has to be
recovered from a drive.

Just my 2 €-cents.

Greetz,

Peter.
PS... and thanks to Tripredacus for closing that dupe topic while I was replying :whistle:

Edited by VideoRipper, 31 March 2010 - 10:05 AM.

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#7
jaclaz

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3 - you would have to de-solder/re-solder (good luck with that)
.....

Other than that, there's no other (known) solution (trust me, I'm a Certified Electronics Technician) sans "Magic Wand".

Now, now, comeon ;) , to de-solder and re-solder a SMD you don't need to be an open heart surgeon :w00t:, nor to be Certified by anybody, you need some specific tools and a little experience.

Actually CrazyDoctor appears to miss both latter requisites right now, but let us not put him too down...:)

Also, don't forget most of the time it's not worth the time and money to repair something
nowadays, unless it's something of high value or, in this case, valuable data has to be
recovered from a drive.

You forget TWO possible reasons :whistle::
  • FUN
  • the satisfaction of being able to do what all other told it was impossible

jaclaz

#8
VideoRipper

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You forget TWO possible reasons :whistle::

  • FUN
  • the satisfaction of being able to do what all other told it was impossible

Sorry... I forgot to mention those two, but you're absolutely right! :lol:
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#9
jaclaz

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...and don't forget....;)

Posted Image

:P
jaclaz

#10
Tripredacus

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Donator

You forget TWO possible reasons :whistle::

  • FUN
  • the satisfaction of being able to do what all other told it was impossible

Sorry... I forgot to mention those two, but you're absolutely right! :lol:


You are also forgetting about the excitement and anxiety you feel when you turn your newly "fixed" or "modified" thing on for the first time. Remember all those times you hit the button and then dive under the table, only to have nothing happen? What a rush! Helpful tip: Just make sure someone else is there in case something goes wrong. As we say at work "Man the fire extinguisher!" :thumbup

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#11
jaclaz

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Remember all those times you hit the button and then dive under the table, only to have nothing happen?


That's what I use my custom made sticks for (besides using them to NOT touch Vista :ph34r:)

http://www.msfn.org/...ic=125258&st=12

And the "real" trick is to first dive under the table and THEN hit the button.
;)

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 31 March 2010 - 12:51 PM.


#12
submix8c

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Well, I wasn't "putting anyone down". The "good luck with that" really meant "jeez, those are small parts!" and yes, I should know (being an E.T. Extra-Terrestrial from Terra and all) it can get frustrating.

In addition, if they are so toasty you can't read the values, well you'll need schematics; so it would be much easier to get a complete PCB. Lots of fun right there...

Someday the tyrants will be unthroned... Jason "Jay" Chasteen; RIP, bro!

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#13
CrazyDoctor

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Hi guys,

Many thanks for the informative and helpful answers! :lol:
Keep help and give a hand to people who is in trouble :thumbup

I've got this pcb which belongs to a different HD model:

http://img151.images...56/65367522.jpg

Can I take the SMD resistor and diode from that one and replace with the burnt parts? :huh:

Edited by CrazyDoctor, 01 April 2010 - 11:09 AM.


#14
jaclaz

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Can I take the SMD resistor and diode from that one and replace with the burnt parts? :huh:

Most probably yes, but it's difficult to say. :unsure:

Unless I am mistaken, you have posted "Side B" of the burned PCB and "Side A" of the "replacement one". :realmad:

Since my crystal ball is again in the shop for tuning :(, I have to use I-CHING, that tell me:

I-Ching Hexagram 31
The Judgement
Influence. Success. Perseverance furthers. To take a maiden to wife brings good fortune.


The weak element is above, the strong below; hence their powers attract each other, in your case the weak element is the PCB and the strong one is the HD, the general meaning is that you are doomed to success, but the road to reach it will not be easy.

:P

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 01 April 2010 - 11:55 AM.


#15
VideoRipper

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It looks like R67 on that PCB is a 0 Ohm resistor, apparently doubling as some sort
of fuse in this design (that's probably why it was blown up on that other PCB) :rolleyes:

The description on D3 is AE83A (if I see correctly) and is probably a Schottky diode to enable
the use of the "Staggered spinup"/"Activity"-pin on the SATA-power connector, which on most
systems isn't even used (although I can't seem to find its datasheet at the moment).

I don't think replacing these two parts will get the drive working again; if you wish you could even
fix a workaround by forcing the "Staggered spinup"-piece of the schematic to ground (I guess). :unsure:

But it's hard to tell without having the PCB (or its schematics) in my own hands, so I'm also
guessing, just like Jaclaz does :whistle:

Good luck,

Peter,
To C the BASIC things in life, use Delphi

#16
CrazyDoctor

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Since my crystal ball is again in the shop for tuning :(, I have to use I-CHING, that tell me:
[quote]I-Ching Hexagram 31
The Judgement
Influence. Success. Perseverance furthers. To take a maiden to wife brings good fortune.[/quote]

The weak element is above, the strong below; hence their powers attract each other, in your case the weak element is the PCB and the strong one is the HD, the general meaning is that you are doomed to success, but the road to reach it will not be easy.

:P

kaclaz
[/quote]

:P :lol:
I will try the replacment and return with updates :hello:


Have A Good weekend everybody!

Edited by CrazyDoctor, 01 April 2010 - 02:02 PM.


#17
VideoRipper

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Have A Good weekend evertbody!

You should fix your keyboard first :lol:

A good weekend to you too :thumbup
To C the BASIC things in life, use Delphi

#18
jaclaz

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It looks a lot like an SMAJ5.0A

http://www.vishay.com/doc?88390
http://www.littelfus...J/SMAJ5.0A.html

jaclaz

#19
CoffeeFiend

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The design of that power area of hard drives is fairly classic. You usually have 2 TVS diodes, one for the 5v and one for the 12v. They protect against reversed polarity and voltage spikes. So if you don't plug it backwards and that your PSU isn't faulty, the drive will happily work without them (if it's for data recovery only, I definitely wouldn't bother). They're fairly big as well, it shouldn't be hard to remove, even for someone inexperienced. What most likely happened (and that people never want to admit), is you plugged the drive backwards, which will do exactly what we see here (admittedly, it's harder with SATA connectors but lots of times they're on adapters)

As for the resistor, it is indeed a 0 ohm (in the last picture at least), so you could just short the two pads (and nothing else around it, obviously) with solder instead. That is assuming it was plugged backwards, and that only the diodes are bad. If something else is short elsewhere on the PCB, it might not be a good idea, so I'd check the resistance on the 5 and 12v buses (with any old digital multimeter) before I power it on first (if it's near 0 ohm, you DON'T want to plug that in your computer).

Feels like I'm repeating myself ;)
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#20
CrazyDoctor

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Great knowledge ! :thumbup

How can I know what is gone on a pcb besides when it's so clear like in the picture?

I mean, is there any technique or a multimeter which can help me to diagnose?


Best Regards,

#21
submix8c

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You usually have to disconnect one (or more) solder points to use a multimeter for any given component to get correct readings. Even so, some components can't be measured with such a simple device (e.g. transistor); you would possibly need an O-scope and even that may not do. I was in the USN and to repair the Fire Control Console sometimes it required simply swapping complete PCB's to isolate the failures.

I think the "0-ohm" may be slightly incorrect. That would be a complete "short", so it must be somewhere above 0-ohm and below 1-ohm (a fraction). Resistors have a color-striping-combination that is used to cross-reference to a chart for exact values. Many/most other components have a "marking" on them corresponding to the type of component to get the "value".

I still recommend taking the smarter way of replacing the whole PCB, as it was stated above that other components could be bad and IMHO it would become extremely difficult (see first paragraph) to check each and every component.

Again, trust me... I know!

Someday the tyrants will be unthroned... Jason "Jay" Chasteen; RIP, bro!

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#22
jaclaz

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I think the "0-ohm" may be slightly incorrect. That would be a complete "short", so it must be somewhere above 0-ohm and below 1-ohm (a fraction). Resistors have a color-striping-combination that is used to cross-reference to a chart for exact values. Many/most other components have a "marking" on them corresponding to the type of component to get the "value".


Actually 0 (zero) Ohm resistors are quite common on modern PCB's :whistle::
http://en.wikipedia....ro-ohm_resistor



I still recommend taking the smarter way of replacing the whole PCB, as it was stated above that other components could be bad and IMHO it would become extremely difficult (see first paragraph) to check each and every component.

Again, trust me... I know!

Never trust the teller. Trust the tale.

:angel

jaclaz

#23
submix8c

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The resistance is only approximately zero; only a maximum (typically 10–50 mΩ) is specified. Thus, a fractional tolerance (as a percentage of the zero-ohm ideal value) would be infinite and is not specified.

Jeez, dude! Even a WIRE has resistance! Ask any Sound Engineer (of which I am).
Wire Resistance and here.

Edited by submix8c, 04 April 2010 - 12:27 PM.

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#24
CoffeeFiend

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How can I know what is gone on a pcb besides when it's so clear like in the picture?

It totally depends. But for anything more advanced than that, you'd need more "specialized" equipment and a fair amount of knowledge. And in a lot of cases, there is just nothing you can do, short of swapping the proper PCB with the right firmware (might require replacing chips) & everything (might even require a clean room). However, in a large number of cases you will see fairly typical failures that are really easy to recognize. Just by knowing the basic layout of that PCB area/placement of the diodes vs power connector/sound knowledge of quintessential electronics designs, you can already tell from the beginning it's a TVS diode, and that D3 is on the 5v rail (if my eyesight doesn't fail me, it's a General Semi/Vishay SMBJ5.0CA), and that when you apply 12v to it, it will do its job (conduct so the voltage doesn't damage anything), and then short (being a silicon device) when it fails, ending up with the result we see here. Applying 5v on the 12v rail won't make the other diode clamp, and D4 seems to be intact as well. It's one of the easiest problems to spot and understand on a hard drive.

I mean, is there any technique or a multimeter which can help me to diagnose?

Well, it's pretty easy going across the different supply rails (3.3v, 5v, 12v) and ground to see if you have a short (or even across the TVS diodes directly; diode check mode works well for this too), but what you can do with a multimeter alone is fairly limited. It's a very good, essential yet basic tool (although you still have to know what you're doing). And it doesn't have to be crazy expensive, I've seen $400+ multimeters that sucked in many ways when compared with models 1/4 of that price. Also, fancy and expensive tools are only useful in the hands of those that know how to use them e.g. a $25000 LeCroy oscilloscope wouldn't have found the problem for you (it's merely a really expensive paperweight in the hands of a n00b)

You usually have to disconnect one (or more) solder points to use a multimeter for any given component to get correct readings

That totally depends what you're trying to accomplish. If you just want to see if various protection circuitry on the power supply side have failed (and similar simple things), you rarely have to.

Even so, some components can't be measured with such a simple device (e.g. transistor)

Actually, a large numbers of multimeters have had that function for a long time ;) Not that it is very practical in most cases admittedly (having to de-solder, SMD parts not having long leads, etc)

you would possibly need an O-scope

I don't see how that would even help here (or with most hard drive PCB repairs for that matter)

I think the "0-ohm" may be slightly incorrect. That would be a complete "short", so it must be somewhere above 0-ohm and below 1-ohm (a fraction)

Of course it's not a perfect 0 ohm. Even a piece of copper/silver that length near absolute 0 degree doesn't have a perfect 0 ohm resistance. It's very close to it however (usually about 0.01 ohm -- something most DMM's can't measure anywhere near accurately).

Resistors have a color-striping-combination that is used to cross-reference to a chart for exact values. Many/most other components have a "marking" on them corresponding to the type of component to get the "value".

I take it you've never worked with SMD parts. SMD resistors don't have color coding. They do have markings "just like other components". A single zero like here, or 3 of them (I see those a whole lot more of those around here) does mean zero ohm.

I still recommend taking the smarter way of replacing the whole PCB, as it was stated above that other components could be bad and IMHO it would become extremely difficult (see first paragraph) to check each and every component.

Again, if it was merely plugged backwards and that the protection did its job like it normally would (and by judging the look of the TVS diodes it seems to have; I'd bet good money that D3 is shorted), then he should be able to get it to work without resorting to that. The TVS diodes are merely protections (read: optional). If after removing them you don't have a crazy short on the 5v or 12v rails anymore, then most likely it'll work just fine (there's always a remote chance damage was done to other components in the picosecond or so before the TVS clamped). It's definitely good enough for data recovery (I personally wouldn't want to keep using that drive long-term, even with a new PCB). Incurring cost (and waiting for parts) to replace the entire controller vs "repairing" it in about 5 seconds for free, just to recover data doesn't necessarily sound smarter to me. Then again, if it's still shorted after doing that, I would get another controller, for sure. Mind you, even that may not work then as one of the sensitive things that might fry if the TVS didn't clamp fast enough is the preamp located on the head stack (good luck changing that yourself!)
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#25
jaclaz

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Jeez, dude! Even a WIRE has resistance! Ask any Sound Engineer (of which I am).

Really? I didn't know that.

I would have thought that asking an Electric Engineer would have been more appropriate. :unsure:

However you made a statement:

I think the "0-ohm" may be slightly incorrect. That would be a complete "short", so it must be somewhere above 0-ohm and below 1-ohm (a fraction). Resistors have a color-striping-combination that is used to cross-reference to a chart for exact values. Many/most other components have a "marking" on them corresponding to the type of component to get the "value".

Unless you have some superconducting material, since even a wire has a resistance, the "complete short" you were talking about is a logical impossibility. :whistle:

So, once we have ruled out the existance of a "complete short", there are two COMMON ways to do a "good enough short":
  • using a short piece of wire or "jumper"
  • using a 0 (zero) Ohm resistor

Method #2 is COMMONLY used on modern PCB's, for the reasons explained in the given link:

A zero-ohm link or zero-ohm resistor is a wire link used to connect traces on a printed circuit board that is packaged in the same format as a resistor. This format allows it to be placed on the circuit board using same automated equipment used to place other resistors instead of requiring a separate machine to install a jumper or other wire.


BTW - remember that the metrics you used in the past:
http://www.msfn.org/...ic=142620&st=38
may also apply here. ;)

:P

jaclaz




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