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One way to make Windows 7 boot up and shut down faster


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8 replies to this topic

#1
MillenX

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Since you have two drives, another option is to move the page file to the other drive. This will improve Windows performance, as your main drive will no longer need to simultaneously write to the page file and read and write to the Windows files at startup and shutdown.


This is the excerpt from the article "How to make Windows 7 boot up and shut down faster" posted by xper on 04/14/2010.
Can someone explain?


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#2
Andromeda43

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As far as mucking about with the Pagefile, I follow the old adage, "If in doubt....DON'T".
MS designed it to work just fine on drive C: so I, like so many others, just leave it there.

There are delays built into the startup routine, by Microsoft, that can be lessened to speed up the boot process.
I found that this worked pretty well.

Shorten the Boot Time in Vista & Windows 7

Go to the start button, choose run, then type msconfig and press Ok.
On the system configuration window, choose Boot tab.
Check No Gui Boot, then lower the timeout to a more manageable time.
I choose 3 seconds.
Next choose advanced options.
This is where you can choose how many processors you have.
Most modern PC's are duo core (2 processors) with some quad core (4 processors)
then choose OK.
Now choose apply and OK, reboot and you should see a marked decrease in boot time.

Then to speed up shutdown I use a shortcut on my desktop encorporating this shutdown command.
%windir%\System32\shutdown.exe -s -t 00 -f

Just copy and paste the blue command into a Desktop shortcut and you'll have a very nice QUICK shutdown routine.

Good Luck,
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#3
MagicAndre1981

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This is the excerpt from the article "How to make Windows 7 boot up and shut down faster" posted by xper on 04/14/2010.
Can someone explain?


can you give me a link?

If your Windows is slow to shutdown, follow my guide to make a shutdown trace and compress the shutdown_BASE+CSWITCH+DRIVERS+POWER_1.etl as 7z or RAR upload and post the link here.
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#4
Tripredacus

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I remember using a registry key in Windows NT 4 that would allow NT to shut down in about 5 seconds. This key held the timeout that Windows allows programs and processes to end themself when given the shutdown command. I believe the default is 30 seconds, but I had changed that key to another value and it shut down a lot faster. I was never really concerned with the shutdown or startup speeds of systems since XP came out, because they are reliable enough to just leave on. Does that registry key still exist?
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#5
MagicAndre1981

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you mean the time when Windows force the services/programs to close. Till Vista it was 20 seconds, starting with Windows 7 it is now 12 seconds.
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#6
Photek

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I used No GUI Boot on XP, and it worked well until one day when scandisk kicked in.

The screen stayed black until it was finished, and I had no idea about its progress, or even what was going on at that time.
(Yeah maybe I should've disabled scandisk, but that's not the point..)

So my question is: Will I miss any important system messages in Windows 7 by using No Gui Boot?

Edited by Photek, 21 September 2010 - 05:56 AM.


#7
MagicAndre1981

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@Photek

this option is not recommend. IS your boot slow? If yes, make a boot trace:

http://www.msfn.org/...howtopic=140247
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#8
cluberti

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I used No GUI Boot on XP, and it worked well until one day when scandisk kicked in.

The screen stayed black until it was finished, and I had no idea about its progress, or even what was going on at that time.
(Yeah maybe I should've disabled scandisk, but that's not the point..)

So my question is: Will I miss any important system messages in Windows 7 by using No Gui Boot?

Yes - any registry or filesystem repair happens during that portion of the boot, and disabling the video driver for that portion (that is what you are effectively doing) simply moves the driver load out, and leaves you without any info just as you would miss in XP. It's one of those things that *can* improve boot speed if the driver is slow to load, but it's just not worth the few seconds you'd save. It's better to use xperf to get a trace and actually visualize the boot performance (as Andre is suggesting) rather than troubleshoot by effectively throwing noodles at the wall to see what sticks. Guessing sometimes works, but can have unwanted side-effects if you don't understand the problem in the first place.
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#9
Photek

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Thanks for the replies.

I have a pretty fast boot, so it's not really a problem. I was just curious if I'd miss any important by using it, since Andromeda43 suggested it.

I'd do it just to get rid of the logo, not for improving speed as I don't think it makes much of a difference for me.
I like Windows, but I tend to remove many logos in the OS, just like I remove all stickers from a new laptop.

Ideally there would be an option with No Gui being canceled if there's anything unusual happening, ie any messages. But I don't think that will happen.




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