larryb123456

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@Larry,

Yes, even though the very dark outline is more noticeable, I think the purple color looks better. At least I can see it better than either of the images with red pulses, but still very subtle. But I really can only see what is truly happening by zooming in.

Larry, out of curiosity, what is the screen resolution and screen size you use on your system?

Cheers and Regards

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Yes, bphlpt, I like the purple outline better also.

I forgot to say in my Post that I was making an image that would be easier for *you* to see.

I knew this, because all the images we have worked on together have contained purple/gray, etc. type colors, and you had no complaints then.

Larry, out of curiosity, what is the screen resolution and screen size you use on your system?

The screen resolution I prefer using is *very low*, at 848x480.

I like the resolution low so that my images (i.e., pixels) are rather large.

Larger pixels at 1600% magnification (the maximum in PS 5.0) makes coloring -- (when using the Pencil) -- much, much easier for me.

I have a small, wide-screen monitor, whose physical screen size -- (I just measured it with a ruler) -- is approximately 16"x9".

So, in other words, all this corresponds to an actual screen resolution of about 53 pixels/inch. I make all my PS images at a resolution "setting" of 72 pixels/inch in the program.

The next higher screen resolution that produces square pixels for me (without having to fiddle with adjustments, etc.) is 1280x720, and images (i.e., pixels) at this resolution are much too small for my liking.

Edited by larryb123456
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The difference in screen sizes can also help explain why those of us on larger displays, with correspondingly smaller pixels, have a harder time seeing the colored pulsing effect unless the image is enlarged.

Cheers and Regards

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I cried myself to sleep many nights thinking that you were neglecting me on purpose. (LOL!)

Hmmm. dubbio.gif

jaclaz

post-25215-0-48401100-1333709328_thumb.j

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@jaclaz

I have only one thing to say about "illogical", and that is, as even a young child would know:

"A implies B, B is true, therefore A is true" This is confusing, sometimes, because it looks so much like good logic: "A implies B, A is true, therefore B is true," known as Modus Ponens or affirmation of the antecedent, is one of the basic valid syllogisms. But affirmation of the consequent is definitely a fallacy.

So, I'll end this Post with this admonition:

Do not Modus my Ponens, jaclaz !!!

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@ bphlpt

Following up on your last Post:

So that I could know for *sure* for *myself*, I changed my screen resolution to 1280x720 and looked at all my "pulsating" animations.

Everything was teeny-tiny on my monitor, of course, but even the subtle "purple-pulsed" letters appeared *crystal clear* to me.

Thank goodness, since I'm "somewhat an artist", I have eyes (vision) like a *hawk* when viewing things close up, like my monitor screen.

So, I guess one's ability to see teeny-tiny, subtle, pulsations would also depend on one's vision (as in 20/20, etc.).

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@jaclaz

I occasionally -- (really, it is more like 99+% of the time) -- have the mental capacity of Forrest Gump.

Such was the case when I tried to use the Modus Ponens "flash app".

I don't have a clue how to operate it.

Would you be so kind as to enlighten me ?

I crave enlightenment, because I most definitely want to Modus my Ponens and Ponens my Modus, as well.

If this works out feeling good to me, I'll try to Modus my Modus and Ponens my Ponens, as well.

But, of course, I'll do all this "behind closed doors", because I surely don't want to get arrested for "public indecency".

Your statement, "IF Red is red THEN Green is green", really doesn't apply for approximately 10% of the population, as bphlpt has discussed very recently in his Post # 249.

bphlpt's version of this statement would read something like this (I guess so, but I shouldn't speak for him. I should allow him to make his own Modus Ponens):

IF Red is red THEN Green is green.

Added in EDIT:

BTW, I've always thought that green women are very sexy. Almost as sexy as the purple women. For, as the well-known expression reads, "Spice is the Variety of Life" !!!

Edited by larryb123456
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.. the Modus Ponens "flash app".

I don't have a clue how to operate it.

Would you be so kind as to enlighten me ?...

Add any proposition to the boxes marked ‘A’ and ‘B’ and press ‘Start’. The argument will be filled in.

Flash has to be enabled in your browser, of course.

After pressing Start, whatever you put in the "A" box will be moved between the "If" and "Then" and also next to the "P2:". Whatever you put in the "B" box will be moved after the "Then" and also under the line. But I must not get the whole point of the app, because it doesn't really make an impression on me. I guess the second way of writing the expression is the mathematical equivalent to the "If A Then B" version? I understood your explanation better, Larry.

As to the red and green letters you used in your last post, regardless whether they were struck through or not, at first glance they looked the same to me. Looking at them longer I could tell a difference, the struck through letters were easier since they have a larger volume of color, and if enlarged even more so.

Cheers and Regards

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Thanks, bphlpt:

Yes, I have the *latest Flash version* and I followed the instructions to a "T", and I agree with you that:

"I must not get the whole point of the app, because it doesn't really make an impression on me."

So, you put something in the "A: box", say "A", and then something in the "B: box", say "B", and press "Start",

and THE SIMPLY AWE-INSPIRING AND AMAZING APP says,

P1: If "A" Then "B"

and

P2: "A" Therefore "B".

WELL, WHOOPTEE-DIDDLEY-DOO !!!

This app is another piece of JUNK, just like THAT PIECE OF JUNK GOOGLE TRANSLATE (LOL!), which made me look like an i.d.i.o.t when I tried to write jaclaz in Italian.

Edited by larryb123456
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Hello, CoffeeFiend:

I'm not colorblind, so I can see the message "I Secretly Loathe the colorblind!"

I guess colorblind people only see "I Heart (i.e., "Love") the colorblind!"

This is a very intelligent piece of "Conceptual Art", IMO, even though it is at the expense of the colorblind.

I sure hope bphlpt finds it funny, and is not offended by it.

(I don't think he will be offended at all, for he will know "where you're coming from".)

Seriously, those of use with all our faculties can't begin to appreciate the difficulties faced by "less fortunate" people.

I'm sure colorblindness has caused bphlpt problems that we could never even begin to imagine.

Edited by larryb123456
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@CoffeeFiend - :) LOL - Very funny! (Not a well hidden message though - it was blurry, but I could still see it. But it was probably done that way on purpose. Can you imagine the irony if the colorblind person could not see the message and bought the shirt thinking it really said "I [heart] the colorblind!"? Now THAT would have been really funny!)

@Larry - Nah - it's just an inconvenience at times. It does keep people from being able to have certain jobs - a surgeon is pretty much out - and it was a real pain in school back in the day to be an Electrical Engineer (reading the resistor color codes was tough). But in World War II, colorblind people were actually sought out as bombardiers, because they were not fooled by camouflage as much as "regular" people. They were better able to ignore the colors and look only for the outlines and movement. Whenever I'm asked "What do you see?", I fall back on this analogy - Pretend I've never tasted a banana. Can you describe to me what one tastes like? - See, without a common frame of reference... We each see the way we always have seen, and until we're told different, we assume everyone else sees the same way. Those of us that are colorblind are definitely NOT "less fortunate". It's no different than being near-sighted, left-handed, or even just short. Other than the occasional annoyance it is no problem.

And don't be so hard on Google Translate. There are several translator programs out there, none of them are perfect, and each is usually better than the others in a different particular area. Jokes, idioms, sayings, even common expressions are all almost impossible to always translate correctly from one language to another. Part of the problem is those phrases are usually tied up with the culture or history of the people that speak that language. As humans, the general gist of those expressions is usually present in one way or the other in most cultures, but they're usually expressed differently. Jaclaz can give you an example of the Italian expression that is best expressed in English as "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush" - it's a bit different. I saw him mention it somewhere but can't put my finger on it at the moment. How about the common English admonition to "Sleep tight." For a non-English speaker, how do you translate that? Tight? Compared to loose? LOL Anyway, I usually just uses those translators as a very rough guide. And if you're trying to translate something into a different language, you usually need to run it through the translator from English to ___, then back from ___ to English, to see if it's still what you thought it was, then if real important, find someone who speaks the language to double check things for you.

Cheers and Regards

Edited by bphlpt
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it's just an inconvenience at times

I guess it depends on which kind of color blindness and to what degree. Two of us in this house have a mild case of it (it's not like always 100% on or off from what I've been explained). Both of us see like 97% fine or whatever. I mostly have a problem telling between some particular colors that are close to each other (it's mostly a funny source of entertainment, telling each other they're wrong). One of my daughters (yeah, I know, it's WAY more prevalent in men and the most common type only affects men) simply can't see a couple of those numbers hidden in dot patterns when she gets her eye exam.

reading the resistor color codes was tough

BIG time. Or colors on some wire, like 25 pair cable that's widely used for communications. The problem is the exact same in both scenarios (at least for me it is): between a dark-ish red and brown, or a dark-ish orange and red. It's not uncommon to be completely unable to tell which one is which. Thankfully, when it comes to traditional color-coded resistors you can quickly and easily measure them. And with modern technology moving to SMT devices everywhere the problem is solved. The colors have been replaced by numbers... which creates a different problem: you need very good eyesight to read the tiony numbers. Especially on the smaller parts. Most 0805-sized parts are still easy to read but 0603-sized parts and smaller can be quite the challenge for the naked eye. if not outright impossible, especially for those with presbyopia.

I do find Google translate pretty handy for getting the general meaning of some text, or translating the odd word you've never seen now and then. It's not perfect but it's better than most other translation methods, other than having someone who speaks both fluently who can translate for you -- and even then it's not always an easy task for that person. There's 3 of us at work who proof-read or translate text. Most of the time we'll have at least two persons read it. One might come up with a better suited word for something, or turn a sentence that doesn't "feel right" into something that "flows better" (or even catch a typo the other has missed). Lots of things don't translate well like bphlpt said.

Jaclaz can give you an example of the Italian expression that is best expressed in English as "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush" - it's a bit different.

I suspect that it translates differently in most languages. For example, in french one could say: "un tiens vaut mieux que deux tu l’auras" which has absolutely nothing to do with birds or bushes. It's also darn hard to translate that literally. You'd probably have to resort to something I enjoy far too much: verbing nouns.

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@bphlpt

@Larry - Nah - it's just an inconvenience at times.

Those of us that are colorblind are definitely NOT "less fortunate".

Both points are good to know, especially the second.

Whenever I'm asked "What do you see?", I fall back on this analogy - Pretend I've never tasted a banana. Can you describe to me what one tastes like? - See, without a common frame of reference... We each see the way we always have seen, and until we're told different, we assume everyone else sees the same way.

Being a "Pseudo-Artist" -- (lol) -- I know that it's all about seeing, so I was very curious to see what colorblind people see.

As a "P-A", I also know that a picture is worth a thousand words.

So, I combined the thoughts in the last two sentences and did the following simple, online research (I should have done it *much, much sooner* -- Shame on me!):

This website shows a colorful image and it shows how the image looks to people with two different types of red/green color deficits (just considering here the info relevant to bphlpt):

Deuteranopia:

The reds all disappear;

Bright red appears greenish-gray;

Purple disappears and becomes blue-gray;

Green looks rather grayish;

Blue, yellow, white, and gray stay virtually unaltered;

Flesh-color looses its pinkish tone and becomes beige.

Protanopia

Looks a lot like deuteranopia, except that the bright red (which appeared greenish gray before) becomes a darker gray.

For me, being a "P-A", if I had colorblindness, I guess painting with color would be out of the question, so I would probably just paint monochrome or near-monochrome (probably in shades of grey).

But I could paint in browns, blues, reds, too, as long as I kept it in one or two colors.

As far as computer graphics, I could use any colors as I developed the image, desaturate it at the end, and then use "Color Balance" to convert it to a desired monochrome color.

But, it might be interesting to paint (or do computer graphics) with just any different colors at random (since I couldn't tell what the colors were anyway) to come up with something a little different or unique.

When I was finished, I could have a person who didn't have colorblindness look at the Artwork to point out a few color-areas that I would definitely need to change so that the work would be a little more acceptable to a general audience.

Well, enough of the "P-A" rambling.

And don't be so hard on Google Translate.

I wasn't really being hard, I was just kidding.

When I first said "THAT PIECE OF JUNK GOOGLE TRANSLATE" in my Post to jaclaz a while back, I put "(LOL!)" after it.

In my previous Post, I neglected to put the "(LOL!)", so I guess you might have thought I was being somewhat serious in my criticism.

So, I went back and edited the Post and put the "(LOL!)" in.

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