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Aerospace

Changing Server Management Companies

5 posts in this topic

I'm consulting with a non-profit group about their current server management company. They have had constant issues with them, paying lots of money to fix issues and not getting results, only ambiguous invoices mainly of lots of remotes services. Basically the organization has no idea what's been going on and don't fully trust the current services being provided. The organization does not know the extent of hardware/software or management involvement that this company has on them.

The information I have thus far is they are running 1 data server (general file storage), an accounting server (they use Quickbooks for all their accounting so I'm thinking either just another data storage or it's terminal/application server), Exchange server, NAS backup server and one unidentified server. There may be another offsite backup server/service provided by the current server management company (documents I have been given elude to this but do not explicitly state). The organization is currently attempting to get more detailed invoices of services that have been rendered and documentation on all services and details the company is providing for them. All the servers appear to be running Server 2003 R2 flavors, I have not been able to get direct access to the software systems at this time to verify.

My question is:

How difficult is it to drop a server management company:

A. and change to a new company?

B. or (if resources allow) to convert to an in-house IT management? (The organization would prefer this option if feasible.)

I know there are a number of unknowns here and I will update when I have more info.

I am looking for any help whether general, from experience or directions pointing me to the right resources.

I've never dealt with completely dropping a management company before so I appreciate any input on what to expect.

Not sure if this is the right place to post but it does deal with Windows Server 2003 flavors. I'm not as concerned with red tape or monetary issues. My concern is the network state (hardware and software) and and its management. If there is a better location, Moderators please feel free to move it as you see fit.

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All of the MSP changeovers I've had experience with didn't do a straight up "drop" like your post is implying. Any time a new MSP comes in, usually there is a period of time (1-3 weeks) where a transition is done to get one company out and another company in. This way they can learn about the customers environment without jumping right into it.

This isn't so much a software question, so I'll put this in GD for now.

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Thanks for moving to a better location.

The company transition overlap makes sense. I don't know why this didn't cross my mind.

Follow up question:

The current MSP does from what I'm told probably 95% of the work remotely (which I think is part of the issue.) During this transition period they will have to be onsite in order to communicate properly with the replacement company correct? Or in this case since they are rarely there anyway, is there any formal or informal "log" as to what the MSP is actually providing to help the new MSP see what's actually going on?

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Ah there was one other thing I failed to mention, and that is handling both MSPs (the new and old) and the company itself. I have seen that "worst case scenario" before where the two MSPs refused to work with one another. And that may end up being a problem when you talk to the MSP to get specifics on what they do. They may not want to help in the transition, or may require to be paid extra for that work.

I don't know if they need to be onsite. It would be handy if the new company sent someone there to get details on what they have, and how they do business, etc.

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