KelvinTwister

Connecting a Windows 98 and Windows 7 through a network

60 posts in this topic

Thank you for everyone's help. But I am glad that I got:

- Access files from Windows 98 through Windows 7 :thumbup

- Use the printer that is connected in Windows 98. :thumbup

Only lacked access files from Windows 7 from Windows 98, but not something that is urgently needed.

:hello:

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One tip I accidentally stumbled upon and that turned out to be the most important of them all: Win9x will not open a Win7 network computer directly; instead, one must know the exact names of the shares and access them directly.

For example, if the Win7 computer named TEST7 has a shared folder under the name of MyShare, then you'll have to type \\TEST7\MyShare in your file manager and it will open it.

I've wasted a lot of time searching around and trying all the tips I could find, until I found the above; as soon as I followed it, the shares became available.

As a mention, I'm only using Total Commander as file manager and as such, I locked a few Win7 shared tabs in one pane so they could be accessed when needed without having to type the share path again. ;)

I don't think it's been mentioned here but the Win9x machine(s) should have Active Directory Client (DSClient) installed.

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I think I am close to get both computers are recognizing:

- Windows 98

post-331479-0-90036900-1319683250_thumb.

- Windows 7

post-331479-0-65966400-1319683272_thumb.

But when I try to access the shared folders of Windows 7 through Windows 98, a message appears: "This request is not supported by the network" and then the message "The server \\Ariescha-PC does not accept remote requests"

I'm usually able to access shared folders from Windows 98 through Windows 7. There is less!

I can access win98 shared folders on my win7. But I still can't see win7 shared folder (an win 7 computer) on my win98.

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Let's straighten this out (using some "loose" definitions/terms) -

Seven (or XP or Vista or Server 2k3/2k8) -

User-A and User-B defined

Signed on as User-A

Win9x (any flavor) -

User-B Defined (AFTER installing "Client for Microsoft Networks")

Signed on as User-B

Win9x does NOT have "ACL" since this is an NTFS-type "Sharing" facility ONLY. Shares between Win9x PC's by DEFAULT allow accesses (note READ-ONLY or FULL plus "Set a Password" under SHARING for given folder). It is NOT based upon User/Group Sign-On. ANY OS/USER can access the Share - Win9x could CARE LESS!

HOWEVER, on NTFS-type Systems, the Share Access MUST define WHICH Users/Groups, WHAT access for that User/Group, AND the Given User MUST have a Password set (REQUIRED). Interestingly, you need not be "signed on" to the Requesting computer (WHEN IT IS AN NTFS-TYPE SYSTEM) with a User/Password combo that is defined on the Sharing PC, but MUST have one defined on the Sharing PC to gain access (and then providing said User/Password combo when attempting access). The "Everyone" Group means "Everyone Defined on Said PC". NTFS-types DO CARE!

SO, in the Win9x System, "Client for Microsoft Networks" MUST be installed (in Control Panel->Network) AND used as "Primary Network Logon" AND a User/Password combination used that MUST MATCH that defined on the NTFS-type system ( see initial statements about User-B ).

If you don't believe me, install Win9x on a Virtual PC and try it as stated. Trust me, it works no other way... (this has been hashed before many times)

Edited by submix8c
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It depends on permissions. I haven't created a "clone" user on the Win7 machine after the 9x one, however I set Read/Write permissions for "Everyone". It works here. But yeah, one needs to jump through hoops and then there's the trick I described above.

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...I set Read/Write permissions for "Everyone"...
Probably why it works (? WOW!) doing it the way you did it. As stated, "Everyone" means Everyone. Read-Only for Everyone is the "default", hence defining the User-B on the NTFS-type system. The "smart" method is to REMOVE "Everyone" and add "User-X" to prevent unauthorized accesses (that you will get on a "loose" 9x system).
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Thank you guys! Now all work good! Win9x->win7->Win9x

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On Windows98, Guest access is enabled, which is why you can just go there and see the shares.

Yeah, everyone says that. Yet for me, the W98SE desktop's shares are not visible to the Vista laptop, let alone vice-versa!

I recently added a WiFi adapter to a W98SE laptop, just to confirm that there was nothing wrong with the Ethernet/WiFi router configuration (similarly, the W98SE desktop configuration). Well, the W98SE desktop and W98SE laptop were happily sharing directories and files straight away. In other words, with a W98SE laptop via WiFi, network connectivity to the W98SE desktop works just fine, yet with the Vista laptop in exactly the same situation, it doesn't.

I can ping between the W98SE desktop and Vista laptop, and set up FTP and HTTP servers on each machine and transfer files that way. Yet other suggestions here such as using the respective IP addresses or share names directly just don't work for me.

In the Vista laptop's registry, I have set LmCompatibilityLevel to 1 (was 3) and even NoLMHash to 0 (was 1), all to no avail. I have also installed the DS Client on the W98SE desktop, again with no result. BTW, it should go without saying, but networking between the W98SE laptop and the Vista laptop are similarly dysfunctional.

So I give up. If I can't see any W98SE shares on the Vista machine, there is no hope, except perhaps retrograding the Vista laptop to a less retarded version of Windoze.

Joe.

Edited by jds
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BTW, in case it's relevant, the version of Vista on this laptop is called "Home Premium".

Anyway, I've just tried again to find out why this thing won't network in either direction with the W98 PC and it may be this : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Link_Layer_Topology_Discovery

There's a patch for XP which is KB922120, but nothing for W98. :(

Joe.

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FWIW, does this info help?

Nope. I don't have any problem of a missing Network Neighbourhood icon.

The stupid thing is that the Vista laptop shows the wireless router, which it can't share anything with/from (and which doesn't belong to the workgroup), but not the W98 machine. However, if I replace the Vista laptop with a W98 one, all the networking & sharing stuff works just fine, so the W98 PC configuration isn't to blame.

Joe.

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<snip>(and which doesn't belong to the workgroup)<snip>
Did you miss that part?
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<snip>(and which doesn't belong to the workgroup)<snip>
Did you miss that part?

No. The point is that this Vista can see a router which isn't a Windoze machine, doesn't have any LLDR patch, isn't part of a workgroup and doesn't have anything to share, yet it doesn't see (or pretends not to see) a W98 machine which, although it doesn't have an LLDR patch (because none is available), meets all the other requirements! :angry:

Joe.

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No. The point is that this Vista can see a router which isn't a Windoze machine, doesn't have any LLDR patch, isn't part of a workgroup and doesn't have anything to share, yet it doesn't see (or pretends not to see) a W98 machine which, although it doesn't have an LLDR patch (because none is available), meets all the other requirements! :angry:

Joe.

I would hazard a guess that the router supports uPnP which Vista also supports. However, Windows 98 doesn't natively and wouldn't be broadcasting itself as such a device.

I know this is an old topic, but basically the Win98 does not show up in Network, but can you get there using UNC Path with computer name or IP Address?

Example:

\\computername\

\\192.168.100.2\

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I would hazard a guess that the router supports uPnP which Vista also supports. However, Windows 98 doesn't natively and wouldn't be broadcasting itself as such a device.

If the W98 desktop isn't broadcasting itself, how come the W98 laptop can see it?

I know this is an old topic, but basically the Win98 does not show up in Network, but can you get there using UNC Path with computer name or IP Address?

Example:

\\computername\

\\192.168.100.2\

Unfortunately, this and every other suggestion in this thread hasn't worked.

I can ping between the machines, use FTP or HTTP server & client software; currently I'm experimenting with TeamViewer 6.

Joe.

Edited by jds
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