JorgeA

Windows 8 - Deeper Impressions

6,162 posts in this topic

Thanks, I'll have to check on that. The DVD drive is internal. Why would that change make any difference, considering that the same drive works in the same computer in Windows 7? I wonder if it might simply be another feature that's missing from the Developer Preview.

Just to make sure -- note that I'm not talking about booting from CD/DVD, I'm referring to reading a CD/DVD when in Windows.

I also talk about the same:

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/de-DE/windowsdeveloperpreviewgeneral/thread/91d5edaa-d3e5-4494-9c63-5259f081d8f9#adab80ec-3c3b-41a6-839b-5f11ec0fc453

Andre,

Thanks very much for the link, I read it. Here's a question --

Do you think this CD/DVD issue is a "design flaw," or a "feature" of Windows 8? Maybe optical disc recognition simply didn't make it into the Preview. But if the problem is actually a "feature" and people have to start tinkering with the insides of a PC case just to get standard, factory-installed devices to work, then without question Windows 7 will be the LAST version of Windows that I use. Until they fix this (among many other things).

--JorgeA

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Optical drives on my machine work fine with the developer preview build, so I suspect it's more a "your machine" problem for some reason with the Win8 DP than a Win8 problem specifically. Not sure what it would be, though.

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Optical drives on my machine work fine with the developer preview build, so I suspect it's more a "your machine" problem for some reason with the Win8 DP than a Win8 problem specifically. Not sure what it would be, though.

cluberti,

That's reassuring -- at least it's not a general problem. Could it be an imperfect download or installation?

Anyway, it looks like I'm not the only one having this issue. In addition to the one MagicAndre linked to, there's this one.

@MagicAndre: I looked at the specs, and FWIW my Win7/Win8 PC's optical drive has a SATA interface.

--JorgeA

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ok, if you use SATA drive, the new Zero power feature might be the cause :

Operating System Now Controls Power to Optical Disk Drives

Platform

Clients – Windows Developer Preview

Servers – Windows Server Developer Preview

Description

In previous versions of Windows, power to the optical drive was not managed when the optical drive was not in use. Now, if there is no media present in the optical disk drive (ODD), the operating system turns off the power to the optical drive. This feature is called zero power ODD (ZPODD). The feature is applicable only to optical drives that use a Slimline SATA (Serial Advanced Technology Attachment) connector.

Manifestation

We have not found any negative impacts from this new behavior; however, you should be aware of it as it may result in unexpected behavior of media-writing software.

Mitigation of Impact

To revert to always-on status, turn off this functionality in the Registry. The absolute path to the registry value is:

HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\cdrom\Parameters\ZeroPowerODDEnabled

Its type is DWORD (32 bit), and if its value is 0, then ZPODD is disabled; if it’s any other value, then ZPODD is enabled.

change the value and try again. Also starting with Windows 7, EMPTY drives are hidden by default. So if you don't have a DVD in the drive it is not shown. Also check this, please.

Edited by MagicAndre1981
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Andre,

Thank you for this information.

If I open Windows Explorer in my Windows 7, and the ODD is empty, when I click on Computer in the left panel the drive does show up in the list of drives in the right panel. If I then insert a disc, the listing will change to give the disc's title.

In my Windows 8, there is no listing for the ODD anywhere. Inserting a disc makes no difference: the ODD doesn't appear anywhere.

Therefore, when I saw the quote (which I assume comes from Microsoft)...

Manifestation

We have not found any negative impacts from this new behavior; however, you should be aware of it as it may result in unexpected behavior of media-writing software.

...I just had to laugh!

As I said before, it's ridiculous that, for Windows 8, average users would have to resort to Registry tweaks in order to recover basic functionality.

Now, as to the Registry item:

Description

In previous versions of Windows, power to the optical drive was not managed when the optical drive was not in use. Now, if there is no media present in the optical disk drive (ODD), the operating system turns off the power to the optical drive. This feature is called zero power ODD (ZPODD). The feature is applicable only to optical drives that use a Slimline SATA (Serial Advanced Technology Attachment) connector.

...

Mitigation of Impact

To revert to always-on status, turn off this functionality in the Registry. The absolute path to the registry value is:

HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\cdrom\Parameters\ZeroPowerODDEnabled

Its type is DWORD (32 bit), and if its value is 0, then ZPODD is disabled; if it’s any other value, then ZPODD is enabled.

I don't have that line in my Registry. It goes as far as HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\cdrom\Parameters\ but then the only thing under it is Wdf. I found no reference anywhere to ZeroPowerODD. (In case it helps, I have Build 8102.)

Notes on Windows Update: Clicking on the Metro tile for Control Panel to check for updates takes you to a screen that merely tells you that there is an update available -- there is no useful information about the update (other than the file size -- not even the name!) to help you decide whether you want to download it right away. Looks like another attempt to get users to unquestioningly download whatever comes down the pike.

If you want actual information on the update, you have to go to the "classic" Windows Update window. To get there from the Desktop takes six actions: click on Start --> Control Panel --> scroll down to "More Settings" --> click on it --> click on System and Security --> click on "Check for updates" under Windows Update. In my Vista Desktop, it takes three actions: Start --> click on Control Panel --> click on "Check for updates" under Security.

--JorgeA

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try to create the DWORD and set it to the value 0. Does this help?

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try to create the DWORD and set it to the value 0. Does this help?

Andre,

I don't have much experience editing the Registry, but I tried both (1) creating a new ZeroPowerODDEnabled key under Parameters with its own DWORD, and (2) creating a new DWORD value within Parameters. Neither change seems to have made any difference. Also tried switching their values between 0 and 1, and still no listing for the optical drive or disc.

Which of the above methods (1 or 2) should be the correct way to modify the Registry for this purpose?

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA
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you must create a DWORD (32Bit) under parameters and set it to 0.

If this still doesn't work, install the feedback tool and send a feedback report. MS promise they read every feedback.

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Try rebooting after making each change, JorgeA.

5eraph,

Thanks for the tip. I tried it -- no dice. :no:

--JorgeA

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you must create a DWORD (32Bit) under parameters and set it to 0.

If this still doesn't work, install the feedback tool and send a feedback report. MS promise they read every feedback.

Andre,

OK -- that's how it's set now, a DWORD value in the Parameters section. Still not coming up with anything.

I'll look for that feedback tool, thanks.

--JorgeA

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John C. Dvorak's take on Windows 8:

"My advice to those at Microsoft who think Metro is cool or groovy is to quit software design and get a job at Old Navy."

:thumbup:thumbup

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It's not just him. Everybody seems to voice a similar-ish opinion.

Windows 8 Metro: Microsoft needs to let users opt-out

Windows 8 will be 'largely irrelevant' to traditional PC users: IDC

Why 'Windows 8' Isn't What I Thought It Would Be

Windows 8 is the new Vista -- and that's a good thing

etc.

Including content you have to signup for like Enterprises are unlikely to jump on Microsoft's Metro:

For enterprises, though, Metro is a problem. [snip] In short, it could be a migration nightmare. And to what end? Metro doesn't seem to have any clear benefits for corporations.

Seemingly they just announced that the Beta (Consumer Preview) will be out on February 29th and yet I don't even care. It's the first time ever I'm not excited at all about a new OS release from MS. Metro is dead on arrival, and a Metro-only Windows is something I will not use. I just want to fast forward 3 years and see what they have in store for Win9, specifically what they've got to replace Metro with. Meanwhile I'll stay on Win7. I don't know if I should laugh or cry at the idea of being able to tell people that Vista is a worthwhile upgrade over Win8.

Unless of course you can disable the Metro garbage. In which case it'll be an OS that has very little to offer over Win7 i.e. not really worth upgrading to anyway, unless you're still using an older version of Windows on a new PC, or that you're buying a new computer. Explorer with ribbons, ISO mounting built-in (freeware does this anyway) and a fancier task manager (process explorer is still better). That's more of a Service Pack or "R2" thing rather than a new OS.

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