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Windows 8 - Deeper Impressions


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#2976
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Here's some information on the "why" of the big push for getting off Windows XP. I mentioned earlier that I can't think of a technical reason considering that it's recommended replacement, Windows 7, gets viruses just as fast as WinXP did years ago with or without the firewall. In fact I spent the past two days cleaning out some backlogged customer computers, all Windows 7 SP1 normal non-privileged standard user accounts with malware ranging from mild to full blown FBI ransomware. ~sigh~ FYI, none of these customers have any clue whatsoever. They apparently click on anything and everything, and skip using a hardware firewall router altogether jacking the ethernet from their cable or FIOS modem directly into the computer. The ones with routers somehow found a way to make them completely unsafe by opening all ports or something. Whatever makes their life easier at home for their laptops I guess. For all practical purposes we are still in 2001 when XP arrived without a firewall and broadband got popular and well, you know the rest. Nothing has changed, especially Windows vulnerabilities.

So contrary to the massive amounts of FUD being spread, you know: "WinXP is NOT safe! Win7 has better security!", the problem with staying on WinXP is clearly not related to that at all. Anyone who fixes Windows problems can tell you that. No, the problem is artificial and arbitrary. It has nothing to do home users either, but it has everything to do with corporate licensing. First up, Thurrott ...

Short Takes: May 17, 2013 ( Thurrott 2013-05-17 )

Sticking with XP? It Will Cost You

As we race toward the April 2014 retirement of Windows XP—that’s the date when Microsoft will formally stop supporting the ancient OS—the firm is trying an ever-evolving strategy aimed at getting hold-outs to switch to a new OS (which I think we can all admit will be Windows 7, not Windows 8). The latest (not so new) message? Sticking with XP will be more expensive than upgrading. Based on a 2012 IDC study, the theory goes like this: Using XP today results in lost user productivity time and IT support and Help desk costs that are actually more expensive than the cost of upgrading. “Windows XP users are saddled with 7.8 additional hours of lost time per year compared with their colleagues using Windows 7,” IDC claims, noting that the typical large organization can save an incredible $700 per year by upgrading. I don’t have a handle on these numbers, but I will say this: While I appreciate the notion of stretching out an investment, sometimes you can hurt yourself trying to do the right thing. XP is going away folks. Let it go.


We'll leave aside the typical patented Thurrott sloppy mistake: "ancient OS" ( WinXP SP3 is newer than Vista RTM and SP1, and just a year older than Win7 RTM, you big dummy ). What he is describing here is Microsoft book-keeping, taking another bite out of these companies dumb enough to sign on for support contracts. They haven't yet figured out it would be cheaper to buy them all standalone one-time rather than shoveling money endlessly into the Redmond money pit. Whatever. They will learn eventually. Probably in the interim many Windows XP computers will now be retired without any replacement whatsoever. Folks that live near big companies would do well to watch for discounted computers in their area or be sure to visit the recycling center and bribe the workers for a few units.

Moving on, here is an article with details on Microsoft's extortion operation ...

Microsoft: Staying on Win XP will cost Indian biz ( ZDNet 2013-05-17 )

By comparison, the cost of not migrating will be approximately US$300 per seat/user for the first year, followed by almost double the cost in the subsequent 12 months, should they choose to opt for a custom support contract to stay on Windows XP after Microsoft ends support for the OS on April 8, 2014, the study showed.

IDC said the difference in cost is primarily due to the extended support and additional cost of support due to "incompatible devices/apps/drivers".


Now the endgame is visible - broken drivers from planned obsolescence between Windows versions. It is arbitrary and capricious. I suspect it is also illegal here in the USA, or should be, and now we know why their agreements and contracts are so secret, and why the OEM backroom deals are also kept under wraps. It is to stave off the FTC and Justice Department. The only real difference between Microsoft ( and similar companies ) and the Sopranos is that one is fictional on TV. The fictional family distributes garbage collection services and Microsoft distributes IT services. This move against Indian companies is akin to the Sicilian enforcer they brought in to rough-up un-cooperative local businessmen.

The point is that there is no real reason for anyone to move from a Windows version that works, unless you are easily cowed into submission by corporate FUD. Home users have no excuse to fall for it though, you own your computer, keep it and all the software. There will come a time when you won't be able to easily own one again. For the corporates I recommend you call their bluff if you can manage them yourselves ( and why shouldn't they? ). Oh yeah, if you read the articles there are "regulations" requiring businesses to have computer systems that meet certain criteria, specifications that Microsoft no doubt had a hand in writing and had supporting whitepapers that they financially sponsored. How convenient. Am I the only one that sees all the conflicts of interests here? Allegedly these regulations keep everyone's data and finances safe. Well how's that working out in real life? Can we see a report of all the thousands of hacking cases, passwords, credit cards, customer data lost in just the last couple years. Guess what, they will have no doubt all met the vaunted Microsoft standards and regulations yet were still utterly compromised. So the upgrading cycle becomes nothing but a self-serving make-work job-security scenario that benefits one institution ... wait for it ... Microsoft.

EDIT: typos, clarity

Edited by CharlotteTheHarlot, 20 May 2013 - 07:45 AM.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...



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#2977
CharlotteTheHarlot

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More interesting articles from the past week ...

Windows 8 'sales' barely half as good as Microsoft claims. Don't even mention the XP/Vista sales comparisons ( UK Register 2013-05-14 )

Windows 8 won't hit critical mass in enterprises, Forrester says ( PC World 2013-05-16 )

Hey, Teflon Ballmer. Look, isn't it time? You know, time to quit? Microsoft chief defies pundits by hanging on - we reveal how ( UK Register 2013-05-17 )

Dell: Our corporate customers are still upgrading to Windows 7 ( NeoWin 2013-05-19 )

Interview: We chat with the creator of Classic Shell ( NeoWin 2013-05-20 )

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#2978
jaclaz

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Nonsense of the day:
http://www.pcworld.c...ester-says.html

Johnson recommends that IT departments first and foremost accelerate and complete their Windows 7 migrations, because this move from Windows XP will put their enterprises’ IT infrastructures in much better shape to accommodate Windows 8 machines.


"better shape"?
Either an infrastructure (whatever it is :w00t: ) is "compatible" with Windows 8 or it is not.

And no, I cannot see ANY way in which an infrastructure with ONLY Windows 7 "clients" may be in any way "in better shape" than one that has already been tested and found working for several years with XP's and at least 2 years already with BOTH XP's and Windows 7's.

One thing is "complete migration" to Windows 7 (that I believe very few companies did) as well as "no windows 7 machines" (that I also believe very few companies are into) and another is "mixed environments with any possble flavour/type of XP, Vista :ph34r: and 7 + Server 2003 and Server 2008 and Server 2008 R2 - and possibly even a couple 2K servers" which is most probably the "average" situation.

jaclaz

#2979
Tripredacus

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Maybe by the time the Enterprise Channel gets off XP and hits Windows 7, Microsoft will have made some tool that lets them manage the online component of Windows 8. But if the old trend of OS usage in the enterprise holds true, Windows 8 will be skipped just like Vista was.

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#2980
JorgeA

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Windows 8 'sales' barely half as good as Microsoft claims. Don't even mention the XP/Vista sales comparisons ( UK Register 2013-05-14 )

That was a good follow-up to last week's devastating analysis of the true state of Win8 sales. Here's a good set of observations:

When it comes to obfuscating Windows figures, Microsoft has form. Redmond originally boasted that it would shift 400 million Vista PCs in two years. In this story from May 2007 we find Bill Gates claiming 40 million licenses for Windows Vista had been shipped since the preceding January.

(Strangely, the same 40m number resurfaced not longer after Windows 8 had launched - when Microsoft's Tami Reller claimed punters were upgrading faster to Windows 8 than they had upgraded to Windows 7.)

We later discovered that licenses were going out, but simply lining the shelves of distributors' warehouses. The channel then responded to what customers wanted - by giving them Windows XP.


One wonders if and when Microsoft will relent on Windows 8, as they did with Vista.

Another really good excerpt --

Some years ago Symbian's former CEO Colly Myers talked about manufacturers compromising their devices by integrating different functions badly. He noted:

I used to think you could convert a lot of things [to an all-in-one smartphone] but I'm older and wiser, I think. You end up with a 'spork' - a combination of a spoon and a fork. It's no good as a spoon and no good as a fork.
And perhaps that's the problem. Microsoft has "sporked" Windows: the desktop, non-touch version of Windows is much more cumbersome than it needs to be. By doing so, Microsoft has made the pure-bred alternatives much more attractive.


Browsing around The Register's site I found this article suggesting that Microsoft kill Metro in Win8 and focus instead on developing their phone OS for tablets:

The Metro experiment is dead: Time to unleash Windows Phone+

Is this the moment for Windows Phone 8, the overlooked diamond in the Redmond rough, to shine?

Now that Microsoft bigwigs have realised that cramming their desktop operating system into a touchscreen tablet format was unwise, to put it generously, how about scaling up the smartphone cousin to capture the exploding mobe market and the tablet world? That'll leave desktop users in peace with a desktop OS.

Let's set the scene for this turnaround, and it starts with the dismantling of Metro[...]


The Charge of the Metro Brigade may have made sense when the route to gaining tablet market share involved simplifying a PC into something that could be operated by a fingertip and slotted comfortably into an A5 envelope. But the market has changed in the past three years: smartphones grew bigger and became more sophisticated. With five-inch displays now common place and "phablets" appealing way beyond gadget geeks to reach some unlikely parts of the market, it now makes more sense to enhance Windows Phone rather than cripple the desktop.

--JorgeA

#2981
Formfiller

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More interesting articles from the past week ...

Interview: We chat with the creator of Classic Shell ( NeoWin 2013-05-20 )


Dot Matrix appears in the comments and p***es everyone off. It's quite staggering how he's able to generate so much controversy even on a fanboy infested site like Neowin. He even begins to annoy the Windows 8 fans.

There are more than enough hints that he's a paid shill, but are his superiors aware of his "work"? He drives more people away than he converts.

#2982
sparkles

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I love this guy's blog, I popped in today to see what he's been up to and lo and behold he's writing about Win8...

The problem as I see it, the people who design these programs have become way too clever for their own good. And just because you can do something, doesn’t mean you should. The people who designed Windows 8 lost sight of the fact that for most people the computer is a tool to get work done, it is not a [***] video game.


Surprisingly only one MetroTurd in the comments section...

#2983
Formfiller

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I guess lots of "normal" people feel this way about Windows 8. All those "fast and fluid" tards should read it.

#2984
JorgeA

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I love this guy's blog, I popped in today to see what he's been up to and lo and behold he's writing about Win8...

The problem as I see it, the people who design these programs have become way too clever for their own good. And just because you can do something, doesn’t mean you should. The people who designed Windows 8 lost sight of the fact that for most people the computer is a tool to get work done, it is not a [***] video game.


Surprisingly only one MetroTurd in the comments section...

:thumbup

Reminds me of the TV commercial about 12-14 years ago, where the webmaster at the office was showing off how to make a little globe spin on the company's site, and the boss asked something like if he could link up the sales orders with the inventory database, and the web whiz shook his head and answered, "I don't know how to do that..."

As @Formfiller says, this cyclist's blog is a good example of a "normal" user's perspective on Win8.

What ever happened to the old adage of “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Microsoft’s motto seems to be, “If it ain’t broke, work on it until it is.”

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA, 21 May 2013 - 03:03 PM.


#2985
Formfiller

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NuMicrosoft has done it again and p***ed off lots of people:



235.000 views and 25.000 comments within a day.

#2986
Formfiller

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Welcome to Oceania!

The Xbox One's next-generation Kinect has a greater interest in your facial features, and is capable of discerning your identity, even if you hand off the controller.

In a brief demonstration in one of its Kinect testing rooms, Microsoft showed press how the Kinect kept track of two player profiles, each tied to a controller in use. When Player 1 and Player 2 swap controllers, the Xbox One is able to recognize which profile is the new Player 1. The Kinect also monitors the position of players, meaning it can match portions of split-screen games to the side of the screen at which that player is looking. This may also translate to fighting games, which is good news if you're the sort to get confused when your spot in the couch isn't aligned with your character.

Microsoft also demonstrated a few more tricks made possible by the new Kinect's enhanced sense of depth, its greater field of view - which does make closer gaming in smaller apartments a more feasible – its ability to see in the dark via infrared, and its flattering scrutiny of facial features. By examining your face's skin color and transparency, the Kinect and Xbox One are able to estimate your current heart rate.


http://www.joystiq.c...the-controller/

And this thing is always connected to boot:

http://www.theverge....lways-listening

The Xbox One will always be listening to you, in your own home (update)

Did Microsoft just invent the Telescreen from '1984?'
...

Even when the console's turned off, users can simply say "Xbox On" to power up — which means the new Kinect will be listening to you in your living room at all times.


An always-on camera, with a connection to the mothership, that can monitor your heart beat, has infrared sensors, watches you in the dark, and is still somewhat working when turned off!

Nice bit about the skin color detection and facial detection. I guess it just wasn't creepy enough.

Used game-sales are blocked and regulated, but that's a given.

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#2987
Formfiller

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Nice touch that the reveal event was hold in a intimidating pyramid shaped building:

Posted Image

You really have to wonder how dense the MS marketing is. Quote from 1984:

"The Ministry of Truth - Minitrue, in Newspeak - was startlingly different from any other object in sight. It was an enormous pyramidal structure.."

Aren't they aware that all this surveillance tech in the new xbox will draw these comparisons? And what do they do? Hold the event in a pyramid!

Just wow! Unbelievable stupid marketing. And then they wonder why there are backlashes.

#2988
SIW2

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And what do they do? Hold the event in a pyramid!


Somebody at MS ( or the event organizer ) has a sense of humour.

Made me laugh.

A bit of levity is needed amidst the attempt to shove this awful thing on the unsuspecting public.

Edited by SIW2, 22 May 2013 - 10:43 AM.


#2989
jaclaz

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Somebody at MS ( or the event organizer ) has a sense of humour.

Made me laugh.

Definitely:
http://www.theverge....lways-listening

Update: A Microsoft spokesperson responded to our inquiry with the following statement.

The new Kinect is listening for a specific cue, like ‘Xbox on.’ We know our customers want and expect strong privacy protections to be built into our products, devices and services, and for companies to be responsible stewards of their data. Microsoft has more than ten years of experience making privacy a top priority. Kinect for Xbox 360 was designed and built with strong privacy protections in place and the new Kinect will continue this commitment.


For a firm established since 1975, i.e. 38 (thirty-eight) years ago, it is good to know that they had privacy as a top priority for more than ten years, the issue is whether they are last ten years or so or from 1975 to 1985.... :whistle:

:w00t:

:lol:

jaclaz

#2990
bpalone

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And what do they do? Hold the event in a pyramid!


Somebody at MS ( or the event organizer ) has a sense of humour.

Made me laugh.

A bit of levity is needed amidst the attempt to shove this awful thing on the unsuspecting public.


From a bumper sticker of years past:

WE ARE MICROSOFT, YOU WILL ASSIMILATE, RESISTANCE IS FUTILE!

Seems to fit their attitude these days.

#2991
Tripredacus

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The XBox One will have a non-servicable hard drive...
http://www.engadget....mpaign=Engadget

Whatever that means. But then look at the one Wired got. It has a standard notebook SATA HDD, doesn't look to difficult to remove.
http://www.wired.com...#slideid-138497

Not that I ever bothered tinkering with a console before like that, I just thought it odd for them to say it like that.

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#2992
JorgeA

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"The Ministry of Truth - Minitrue, in Newspeak - was startlingly different from any other object in sight. It was an enormous pyramidal structure.."

Aren't they aware that all this surveillance tech in the new xbox will draw these comparisons? And what do they do? Hold the event in a pyramid!

Just wow! Unbelievable stupid marketing. And then they wonder why there are backlashes.

Great catch, about Minitrue being in a pyramid-shaped building!

I don't know which possibility is more disturbing: that the Microsoft folks are clueless and oblivious to all these parallels to '1984'... or that they're well aware of them. :ph34r:

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA, 22 May 2013 - 01:13 PM.


#2993
JorgeA

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Somebody at MS ( or the event organizer ) has a sense of humour.

Made me laugh.

Definitely:
http://www.theverge....lways-listening

Update: A Microsoft spokesperson responded to our inquiry with the following statement.

The new Kinect is listening for a specific cue, like ‘Xbox on.’ We know our customers want and expect strong privacy protections to be built into our products, devices and services, and for companies to be responsible stewards of their data. Microsoft has more than ten years of experience making privacy a top priority. Kinect for Xbox 360 was designed and built with strong privacy protections in place and the new Kinect will continue this commitment.


For a firm established since 1975, i.e. 38 (thirty-eight) years ago, it is good to know that they had privacy as a top priority for more than ten years, the issue is whether they are last ten years or so or from 1975 to 1985.... :whistle:

:w00t:

:lol:

jaclaz

:thumbup

Given that they snoop into customers' SkyDrive contents and that they're helping New York City to set up a city-wide network of surveillance cameras, those "ten years of experience" in privacy must've been 1975 to 1985. Certainly not anytime recently! :angrym:

Then again, maybe to them "privacy" actually means being constantly watched and monitored, just as in '1984' the slogan was that "Freeedom is Slavery."

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA, 22 May 2013 - 01:18 PM.


#2994
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The XBox One will have a non-servicable hard drive...
http://www.engadget....mpaign=Engadget

Whatever that means. But then look at the one Wired got. It has a standard notebook SATA HDD, doesn't look to difficult to remove.
http://www.wired.com...#slideid-138497

Not that I ever bothered tinkering with a console before like that, I just thought it odd for them to say it like that.

One thing we were quick to ask about was the integrated storage. 500GB sounds like a lot today -- but so did the 20GB unit in the original Xbox 360. The HDD there was, at least, replaceable. Can you do the same with its successor? Sadly, no.

Doubtless it has to do with their DRM/copy protection scheme. Sounds like it's impossible to reinstall the system on a replacement HDD, which means that if the original drive fails, then you're SOL. Right?

Lovely system they're coming up with. Imagine if Hasbro, Milton -Bradley or whoever had been able to prevent buyers of their games and toys from lending them to friends and family. That's what MSFT is trying to move people to. Sheez.

--JorgeA

P.S. I like these bits in the comments section:

A console is a PC which has 99% of its functionality removed while still maintaining 50% of the price.


I can already predict what's going to happen. They will limit external storage to some stupid low amount. Then charge you for cloud storage. It's all about the Benjamins baby! And M$ is a pro at collecting them.


I see that somebody asked my obvious question:

But what if the main drive dies. Its basic function to be able to replace something like that. This is not just about total storage. This is a design fail in a big way.



#2995
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From a bumper sticker of years past:

WE ARE MICROSOFT, YOU WILL ASSIMILATE, RESISTANCE IS FUTILE!

Seems to fit their attitude these days.

+1

Edited by JorgeA, 22 May 2013 - 01:38 PM.


#2996
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Latest from Neowin:

Study: 60% of Windows 8 desktop users launch a Modern app less than once a day

Today, a new report claims that the percentage of current Windows 8 owners that use Modern apps extensively is quite low. The report comes from Soluto, which sent a copy of its findings to Neowin ahead of their official launch today. The Israel-based software company collects data from a PC app that helps with finding performance problems. Soluto says that for their report they looked at 10,848 Windows 8 PCs and analyzed 313,142 Modern app launches across 9,634 unique Metro apps.


Attached File  dsg43345254354fghfghgf.jpg   24.13KB   1 downloads

Note that surprisingly (and perhaps tellingly) the percentage of touch-enabled laptop users launching a Metro app less than once a day is virtually the same as the percentage of non-touch laptop users who launch Metro apps less than once a day. In other words, having "touch" hasn't made a great deal of difference in the proportion of customers using Metro apps. There's just not much point to touch, or to Metro. (Touch-enabled users launch 2.22 Metro apps per day on average, compared to 1.51 Metro apps/day for non-touch laptop users.)

Here's the link to the original report (the report you see may change over time), and a quote from it:

There’s a consensus in the market that Windows 7 was a good, solid operating system, and it’s unclear why the change to Windows 8 was needed for those who are happy with Windows 7. Microsoft had to do something to compete with iOS, but we can’t explain why they also changed the experience for people who just wanted their Windows as it is.

On the other hand, another consensus in the market is that if you don’t innovate, you die. Microsoft had to innovate, and time will tell if their big bet was good or bad.

The dilemma is only apparent, of course. The solution is to offer the user a choice of UI, either upon installation or at will, instead of trying to foist Metro on everyone willy-nilly. If it's as wonderful, easy, and appealing as its fans claim, then there should be no problem building an audience for it. If not, then -- well, the market will have spoken. Let it speak for itself.

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA, 22 May 2013 - 11:43 PM.


#2997
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Paul Thurrott looks into his crystal ball:

Azure Is the Future of Microsoft

What I'm about to suggest will be controversial in some circles. But it's a message that IT pros need to hear now so they can prepare for the future. And it goes like this: The market for on-premises servers and infrastructure is coming to an end. The future—the end game, if you will—isn't on-prem, and it's not even really a hybrid model, although there will of course be some of that. It's the cloud. And for Microsoft, that means Azure.


And certainly there are legitimate concerns about regulatory and privacy issues, and about bandwidth availability too. I get it. But here's a basic truth that I suspect you'll agree makes Azure and Microsoft's other cloud services inevitable. Microsoft has completely changed its basic business model over the past few years. Because of its history, the firm will of course continue supporting the on-premises solutions that make sense over a certain number of years. But this migration, this sea change, is inevitable. And it is happening right now. Eventually Microsoft will have to make the case that you, its customers, should follow this trusted source down this same path with it. My bet is that it will happen soon.

Anybody who hasn't slept through the last couple of years will be aware of the widespread and growing problem of enterprise online security. And in particular Microsoft's record on privacy is, shall we say, as solid as a block of Swiss cheese. Not to mention their admitted active cooperation with official snoops. If I were a CEO, I'd fire any IT manager who suggested moving the company's data to a server controlled by anybody other than us, much less Microsoft.


In a related post, Paul did offer the following insight about Windows 8 sales:

Windows 8 is evolving into the most controversial Windows release of all time, as much the result of our highly connected echo-chamber times as any functional weirdness. That Microsoft declined to release Windows 8 license sales figures with its quarterly financial results, is, I think, telling.

From 2009 to date, the firm has consistently sold about 20 million Windows licenses a month, and the suspicion is that Q1 2013 was the first quarter in which that didn’t happen. One can only conclude that Windows 8 confuses too many in a time in which viable mobile computing options—various tablets and smartphones—exist. And no business would ever broadly roll out the “touch first” Windows 8 this early in its life cycle.

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA, 22 May 2013 - 11:57 PM.


#2998
jaclaz

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@JorgeA
Please re-read, slowly this time ;), this post (AND links in it):
http://www.msfn.org/...40#entry1022940

You cannot use/trust a source only because - casually - it has the same opinion as you have.

MInd you, the guys over there seem all like very nice peeps, and possibly their software is the third best thing in life after sliced btread and ice cream :thumbup , but they are seemingly too young and enthusiastic (which are very nice characteristics, BTW) to be able to provide any unbiased opinion or meaningful data.

Right now (and no offence whatever intended to the good guys ) the one in their team that I would trust more (generally speaking, not on PC related technology ;)) would be Speedy :w00t: :
http://blog.soluto.c...side-soluto-hq/
Spoiler

:lol:

And BTW, the good Soluto guys did choose Azure (coincidence? :unsure:):
http://blog.soluto.c...he-soluto-team/
In the spoiler the most relevant part:
Spoiler


jaclaz

#2999
CharlotteTheHarlot

CharlotteTheHarlot

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Latest from Neowin:

Study: 60% of Windows 8 desktop users launch a Modern app less than once a day

Today, a new report claims that the percentage of current Windows 8 owners that use Modern apps extensively is quite low. The report comes from Soluto, which sent a copy of its findings to Neowin ahead of their official launch today. The Israel-based software company collects data from a PC app that helps with finding performance problems. Soluto says that for their report they looked at 10,848 Windows 8 PCs and analyzed 313,142 Modern app launches across 9,634 unique Metro apps.

And elsewhere ...

Study suggests majority of Windows 8 users ignore Metro apps ( TechSpot 2013-05-22 )

More than half of Windows 8 users just treat it like Windows 7. Almost nobody using Windows Store apps, survey finds ( UK Register 2013-05-22 )

Quite a beating the MetroTards are taking in the comments, even at NeoWin. Probably a bit surprising to them. :lol:

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3000
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Paul Thurrott looks into his crystal ball:

Azure Is the Future of Microsoft

Quite a barfworthy article IMHO. Many quotes in there to demonstrate his shill-worthyness.

A fine time to resurrect this one ...

Posted Image


... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...





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