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Windows 8 - Deeper Impressions


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#3226
jaclaz

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I can remember when games used to have tons of goodies in the package:

I can even remember when PC's and Software came with manuals ("real" books), I still have a DOS manual that came with the pre-installed DOS (and Windows 3.x) Compaq computer, which is actually very good, and that no "hyperlinked" help file can beat (not because of being hyperlinked help files instead of print on paper but because having been poorly written, and missing 2/3 to 3/4 of commands, sintaxes and anything besides very basic usage).

jaclaz


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#3227
bpalone

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Sounds like the good ole boys at Microsoft are sticking another dagger into themselves. Here is a quote from the article:

...Microsoft is sticking indie developers with the burden of being forced to find a publisher in order to sell their game.


Sure sounds a like a death from a thousand cuts.

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#3228
Formfiller

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"NuMicrosoft" should produce self-destruct buttons. Instant monopoly.

Edited by Formfiller, 17 June 2013 - 01:16 PM.


#3229
jaclaz

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Sure sounds a like a death from a thousand cuts.


To be fair, there is a portal for indipendent games (at least for the XBOX 360).

How it is managed:
http://xbox.create.m...it_works_review
is clear from the evident attention to details.

What can i say? :unsure:
Lorem ipsum dixit! :realmad: (and I do mean it! :yes: )
Spoiler


jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 17 June 2013 - 01:18 PM.


#3230
HalloweenDocument12

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I still play Civ1, too. I have a hard time ranking the best games I ever played but it is up there, probably top 5. My general experience is different, though. I tend to stockpile more good games over time. There just seems to be more in the past because I'm compressing decades. One thing I will say is that today's market is so incremental and saturated that it's not a good value to game all the time. Instead, it's better to drop in and out and buy the games that are retrospectively held in esteem. Doesn't work with MMOs, though, as, outside of WoW, those need to be played in the first 4-6 months of release. Even WoW is inaccessible to new players since circa 2010.

It's harder to find games with complex rulesets like Civ and Orion. The good games today are good for different reasons. I haven't played the recent Civs and their expansion packs, though. Sim City looks like a total mess in both basic execution and game mechanics.

To keep this kind of on topic, the problem with effectively raising prices on games is that there's so much more supply and incremental quality has gone down. The new equilibrium point is achieved via the purchase of used games. If game makers are to corner this market, it has to operate similar to a free market otherwise it will collapse. Perpetually charging $60 for old games is a pipe dream. The market won''t support it.

#3231
Formfiller

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Oh my God, the failtrain doesn't stop:

http://www.forbes.co...rm-except-xbox/

There's no need to go through yet another laundry list of the Xbox One's potential problems, but there is one that's getting overlooked in favor of the larger issues of price and DRM. It's the way Microsoft MSFT +1.05% is
limiting indie game development on the Xbox One.

The primary case in point to demonstrate the issue is Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty from Oddworld Inhabitants. The game is coming to every platform from PS3 to PS4 to Wii U to PC to Mac to Linux, but not the Xbox 360 or Xbox One. Why? Because Microsoft is sticking indie developers with the burden of being forced to find a publisher in order to sell their game. This demand perplexes Oddworld boss Lorne Lanning who spoke to Eurogamer about his frustration with trying to work with Microsoft regarding the policy.


And:

http://www.eurogamer...one-or-xbox-360

Microsoft's policy is in contrast to Sony's, which enables self-publishing across the PlayStation Network.


And:

http://www.neowin.ne...-games-branding

Xbox One to ditch Xbox Live Arcade and Xbox Live Indie Games branding .. So what does this mean for independent game developers? Shacknews reports that, in a chat with Matt Booty, Microsoft's general manager of its Redmond Game Studios and Platforms, all game developers must have some kind of publishing deal, either with Microsoft or a third-party company, before their games can be released for the new console.


Wow, from XNA and Xbox Arcade to this?! Well, it's NuMicrosoft after all, so yea. What Microsoft surely needs are more mass p***-off decisions like these.

You can't make this stuff up even if you tried to. It's as if the Xbone is just a cover up for an insurance fraud.

Edited by Formfiller, 17 June 2013 - 01:39 PM.


#3232
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Irony explosion:

http://www.neowin.ne...comment-2239229

Everyone forgets the Sony rootkit on music CD's and the PSN hacking, exploding batteries. Sony has the most lobotomized fans.

Apple and Sony fans are very much like a cult, what we are seeing is 6 years of frustration from Sony fans. They are rabid dogs clinging to all the negative things they can when it comes to MS.

Thing is Sony is the company that is in deep financial problems, their insurance side of them is the only thing keeping them afloat.

It's sickening how Sony ALWAYS gets a pass, these brain dead zombies fans always let Sony get away with everything. Sony fans used to flip out that Live charges a fee for online play and now that Sony is doing it they just make excuses why that is ok because it's Sony.



#3233
HalloweenDocument12

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I disagree with the sentiment that "Sony gets away with everything". They've lost on pretty much every front over the course of a decade. There will always be fanboys but the market doesn't lie. Sony rightly received mass criticism for their handling of the rootkits, batteries, and PSN hacking.

But the way Sony is handling the PS4 thus far demonstrates that they're learning. Sony has lost much ground over the past 10 years and needs/needed a new strategy. We may be seeing it.

Microsoft would be afforded a similar courtesy with a similar turnaround. I don't think people really like Sony all that much; they just look good by comparison. They haven't been a lifestyle brand since the late-80s save for a resurgence with the Playstation brand that ended before the PS3 was released.

#3234
dencorso

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Sony's out there since 1946. One can say anything about them, but one has to recognize they're resilient. Can that be said about MS? Perhaps... but it sure is not a given, and they're sure doing their best to kill their own goose that lays golden eggs.

#3235
CharlotteTheHarlot

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No kidding. The bits don't degrade.

But bits are also licensed, NOT sold.

What about revamping this not-so-old idea (that thank goodness never took hold)?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flexplay

They could make non copyable DVD's that only last - say - a week/2 weeks/1 month/3 months/6 months/1 year and a "gold edition" (for which you have to be a member of the "Premium XboX1 Club", you need to be introduced by at least two pre-existing members, make a solemn oath about never using an iPad and pay a nominal fee of 360 US$ /year) lasting 2 years.

For the most affectionate and smartest one, there is also the "Excellence Restricted Circle" which offers exactly the same as the above, but costs 720 US$/year, minimum 10 years :w00t: and you have remote assistance - at most two hours/year - and provides you with a T-shirt and a badge representing a very tiny "O" with an even tinier "x" in the middle, symbolizing at the same time how exclusive the circle is and the actual vote in roman numerals the MS guys give to the console in a scale from 0 to 10).

jaclaz

I remember something about that. Among other things I have been involved with bands and recording studios and labels. From time to time the "Mission Impossible" theory rears its ugly head and some ( not many ) artists I know think its the greatest thing since sliced bread bottled beer. Transporting this concept from the DVD or video arena ( where Hollywood really wants to make it happen ) to the music industry ( where only the bureaucrats really are interested ) never gets any traction because the actual artists understand that their customers are fickle and even vengeful. Witness the wicked backlash that wiped out Metallica after Lars set upon his fans that shared music. There was a civil war over Napster with some artists taking sides and others taking cover. :lol: The artists I know don't want to antagonize their fans and are truly interested in getting that first sale. The concept of used sales rarely comes up because truthfully, they themselves also are buying up used music, DVD's, vinyl albums, and yes, CD's at flea markets and from Amazon. NOTE: none of this is about counterfeit goods at all, even though the Thurrott lackeys keep hinting at it through strawmen arguments.

Anyway, what it's all about with this "flexplay" and similar notions is to make that final jump from private property you own to virtual intellectual property you don't own, and ideally this will itself later evolve into 100% pure Pay-Per-View. That is the Holy Grail to all media companies. They will trot out the arguments of starving artists, even though they are usually starving because of their ( record label ) own actions, but their goal is to continually enrich themselves with a never-ending stream of income. The evolution of the Internet finally into a useful distribution tool has brought this issue to the front again. The problem I think we all have is that even though people who question this paradigm are far more numerous than those fat cats sitting at the top, they have the lawyers and lobbyists and even as we speak they are constructing themselves a digital boomtown. That first big step was the DMCA and its descendants, but now they are eyeballing the brass gold ring. And judging by recent history it sure looks like the Congress and White House and Supreme Court over here are sufficiently bought and paid for to make this happen.

All we can do is keep fighting anyway and get the word out.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3236
CharlotteTheHarlot

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It's not true that used games are identical to new. In many ways they degrade in the same fashion as cars. Used games are far more likely to have scratches and other forms of damage, which may make the game skip cutscenes or even render it unplayable. Packaging and inserts are likely to be damaged or missing. The center knob of the case is more likely to be broken, and the case in general is more likely to be in overall poor condition. The older the game, the more magnified the effect. Over time product is lost due to damage.

There's also the issue of the game simply having less overall value even with "identical bits" by the virtue of it disappearing from public consciousnesses or removal of features such as multiplayer, either by fiat or by de facto via abandonment of player base.

If game quality was up to par, we wouldn't be seeing a glut of $5 off used games mere days after first sale. While evil Gamestop may be flipping those games at near retail, the people trading them in are getting a fraction back. Gamers are panicking over a poor purchase and are willing to accept virtually anything back to minimize the sunk cost. If they were motivated to hold onto the game for more than a week or two, there wouldn't be a glut of supply. As it is, these first sale customers are receiving negative value by buying at $60 and selling at $20 a few days later. Also, this $20 is in store credit, so, wow, how bad can these games be when customers are willing to abandon them without even cash in hand?

All excellent points. I didn't feel I needed to go into it because I felt that the condition of these used items was another strawman that the Thurrott lackeys throw out to muddy up the waters. I think they use it as a self-distraction tool to avoid facing the real question of who the he!! do they think they are to set their sights on someone else's private property and what price they sell for. Your point about losing value over time is also a good one, the "window of opportunity" for interest to ( most ) gamers is short. Most importantly, you mention quality of games. Ruling out counterfeiting, just why are so many games being sold back? It's because in the opinions of these first sale purchasers, they suck! That really is the point they are missing, isn't it? Talk about scapegoating. But when GameStop sells a physical work later for some price less than full retail, just where does anyone get off concerning themselves with this? This is the closest thing to a free market to be found in the synthetic economy of software in the Microsoft sector of the PC and console universe.

I neglected to mention something important ( which you and everyone here certainly knows already ) ... None of this is about Steam ... It currently is about GameStop physical media. Don't worry though, they will certainly combine the two different cases into one muddled thought to further confuse the issue. Steam is in itself a product of the current environment. It is a solution solving the problems created by Microsoft and EA and all the many others along the way, and that is precisely why it exists and precisely why they hate it. Without consoles, and DRM, and high priced games, and especially the restrictions on using discs, typing in keys, answering questions, getting placed on SPAM lists, for all these reasons Steam can thrive. It is a drop-in turn-key solution, a virtual console that allows moderate gamers to not have to fiddle with hardware and software settings too much, in short, it lets them play their games. The fact that Microsoft and her fanboys have now developed "Steam-envy" ( credit ) speaks volumes. It's like home builders getting angry at modular homes.

It's really kind of ironic and sick at the same time. The industry created the problem of user confusion, apathy and disrespect in the first place, not trusting their customers, hitting them with DRM and hoops to jump through, then mega-merging of small game studios, killing many off, resulting in a Big Government Big Hollywood Big Entertainment cabal. Microsoft is deep in this too by butchering the Windows platform over time, screwing around with Direct-X compatibility, making the PC a moving target for developers. In fact I think they caused the biggest upheaval by even getting into consoles into the first place, through a conflict of interest by having both PC and Xbox under the same roof, and unsurprisingly one huge part ( PC ) gets stepped on by the other smaller money-losing part ( Xbox ). So, in the aftermath along comes Gabe with a pretty good fix for many gamers. Naturally, MicroZealots are green with envy.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3237
CharlotteTheHarlot

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PlayStation 4 is destroying the Xbox One in Amazon customer poll ( TechSpot 2013-06-15 )

Previous results from the Amazon Ps4 vs Xboner poll on June 14, 2013 ...


94% Of Gamers Favor PS4 To Xbox One, According To Amazon Poll ( CinemaBlend 2013-06-13 )

Currently 21,501 to 1,240. :whistle:

Time to check in two days later on June 16, 2013 ...

Posted Image


Sony winning previously with 94.547%, now winning with 94.745%. You think Microsoft is going to notice this? :yes: You wanna bet they are in panic mode right about now? :yes: Will they do the right thing? :no:


I went back to check today and it appears to be gone now! Over at the TechSpot linked page above there is this tidbit ...

Update (6/17): It appears Amazon took down the poll, but not before visitors had a chance to take a screenshot of the results. As of late Sunday the numbers were equally one-sided with 38984 votes for the PS4 versus 2162 for the Xbox One.


Note that the numbers cited by the TechSpot author mirror the ones from my screencap. If anyone has anything newer or information on why they pulled the poll please post it!

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3238
CharlotteTheHarlot

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New Dvorak column just out. Seems to have done a 180 from the last one here ...

Almost forgot, John Dvorak inexplicably expressed similar crazy thoughts a few days ago ...

The NSA Is Mining Our Data. So What? ( John C. Dvorak PC Magazine 2013-06-12 )

... which astonishingly places him drinking from the same Kool-aid fountain as Ed MicroBott!

The real story in the NSA scandal is the collapse of journalism ( Ed Bott ZDNet 2013-06-08 )

How did mainstream media get the NSA PRISM story so hopelessly wrong? ( Ed Bott ZDNet 2013-06-15 )

... I wonder if he is reading this thread? Anyway, here is the latest ...

The NSA's Surveillance Will Devastate Commerce ( John C. Dvorak PC Magazine 2013-06-17 )

... and this one makes a brilliant point in light of all the recent breaking news ...

But we've been missing one important aspect of all this. These programs, all in the name of supposedly stopping terrorism, will severely hurt the American economy as foreign sales will challenge American products.

What foreign government, agency, or corporation in its right mind would buy Microsoft Office 360, for instance, if it suspects that every memo written will float up to the Microsoft/NSA cloud to be scrutinized by some "analyst" for unknown reasons. And Google Docs is no better.

What overseas id*** would use any of these services? Who would create a Facebook account? Who would use any American instant messaging system?

I gotta admit this hadn't even occurred to me yet. Maybe it is the sheer volume of news about data gathering and all the conflicting reporting, all the denials and rationalizations. But this has to be a serious consideration now, I mean really, given an actual choice, who would select a USA based cloud service, be it Microsoft Office 364 or any of the countless backup providers?

I'd expect to see some smart people overseas capitalizing on this eventually, marketing their services as spy-proof. It might even help to explain as clever posturing the stories mentioned upthread where Google and Twiiter are suggesting they are challenging the spying paradigm. This whole fiasco will likely be a huge boost to Kim DotCom and his new Mega. In fact, we can probably make sense of that story now when they shutdown Megaupload and confiscated all the storage. What are the odds they were just looking for warez and music? His lawyers are probably celebrating this spying news because of all the new angles it gives them for the eventual court case, if it ever even happens.

If I owned an American based company that operated storage or communications services I think I would be drinking heavily right about now. :yes:

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3239
dencorso

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I gotta admit this hadn't even occurred to me yet.

:blink:
Remember when Orkut, then Facebook, first became hits among the young?
That's when I first though "those places will destroy privacy even if they don't actively nose into people's infos".
The only thing surprising about PRISM is its eventually actually getting in the news... unless, of course, it's all a smoke-screen hiding even bigger things...

#3240
jaclaz

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One thing Dvorak has right.
Those four slides are lame.

jaclaz

#3241
Formfiller

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I've wrote about this on Techbroil already, but in case you haven't noticed, there is currently a huge trend within the fanwhore community to justify the Xbone with a lie. Here's the lie:

I guess you don't understand how steam works... the point isn't to lower initial costs of games, which it technically HAS due to the stagnant price of games from last gen to this, the real benefit comes with used game sales 3-4 months down the line. AAA games on steam are released at $60 just like any other platform, but due to the lack of a used game market on Steam you also see huge sales on games a few months down the line on digital sales. If youre a frugal gamer you can simply wait for the online sales that will come.


http://www.neowin.ne...comment-2238969

They are claiming that PC games are now cheaper than in the past, because Steam has "destroyed" the second-hand market. And that's utter bul*****. Stores discounted games before Steam was even invented.
Bargain bin deals at retailers for PC games were (often still are) usually cheaper than the Steam deals. And the discounts usually started faster than they do at Steam.

And even today, boxed games are often cheaper on Amazon than their download-only equivalents on Steam, especially older titles, and I am not even talking about the second-hand resellers there.
And those Steam-deals where you get multiple games.. anyone remember game compilation packages? They were less costly.

They are lying through their teeth. If anything, Steam has made PC games more pricey on average.

Edited by Formfiller, 18 June 2013 - 10:40 AM.


#3242
HalloweenDocument12

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anyone remember game compilation packages? They were less costly.


Yes, back in the early to mid 90s you could get a lot of value through buying the "packs" and "chests" which were usually around $20. Some manufacturers went as far to load all the games onto a single CD rather than filling the pack with individual releases.

Also from Techbroil:

I thought the point was to lower initial cost of games and then recover the "extra" through additional first sales by removing the used game market. Now I have to take it on faith that Microsoft and partners will actually drop prices instead of the free market forcing the issue. How is this a tenable position? Lower initial prices would mitigate the risk of possibly never seeing a price drop. As it is, there's blatantly negative value to the consumer.

There's also an inherent conflict of interest with the same party controlling new and used games. It would be trivial for Microsoft to decide that they needed more Halo sales and stop selling copies of Halo Minus One. Disney attempts something like this by putting titles into "the vault" after a limited release, but the used market thwarts their attempts to create artificial scarcity. Without the corrective force of the secondary market, publishers have total price control.


They are lying through their teeth. If anything, Steam has made PC games more pricey on average.


Kinda like how banks saved money on tellers by installing ATMs but still charged "convenience fees" for withdraws until a few years ago.

Edited by HalloweenDocument12, 18 June 2013 - 11:46 AM.


#3243
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I can remember when games used to have tons of goodies in the package:

I can even remember when PC's and Software came with manuals ("real" books), I still have a DOS manual that came with the pre-installed DOS (and Windows 3.x) Compaq computer, which is actually very good, and that no "hyperlinked" help file can beat (not because of being hyperlinked help files instead of print on paper but because having been poorly written, and missing 2/3 to 3/4 of commands, sintaxes and anything besides very basic usage).

Ditto. I agree with every word you wrote in there.

My first computer, a Sanyo MBC-550, came with about six ring binders full of manuals for MS-DOS and associated programs (mainly for programmers). I still have them stored in a box somewhere.

I bought two Dells in the '90s -- a WFWG 3.11 in 1995, and a Win98(FE) in 1998. The first one came with all manner of quality-bound paperback manuals; the second one, just a few years later, already came with most of the documentation (such as there was) on the hard drive.

--JorgeA

EDIT: typo!!

Edited by JorgeA, 18 June 2013 - 01:52 PM.


#3244
JorgeA

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I still play Civ1, too. I have a hard time ranking the best games I ever played but it is up there, probably top 5. My general experience is different, though. I tend to stockpile more good games over time. There just seems to be more in the past because I'm compressing decades. One thing I will say is that today's market is so incremental and saturated that it's not a good value to game all the time. Instead, it's better to drop in and out and buy the games that are retrospectively held in esteem. Doesn't work with MMOs, though, as, outside of WoW, those need to be played in the first 4-6 months of release. Even WoW is inaccessible to new players since circa 2010.

It's harder to find games with complex rulesets like Civ and Orion. The good games today are good for different reasons. I haven't played the recent Civs and their expansion packs, though. Sim City looks like a total mess in both basic execution and game mechanics.

To keep this kind of on topic, the problem with effectively raising prices on games is that there's so much more supply and incremental quality has gone down. The new equilibrium point is achieved via the purchase of used games. If game makers are to corner this market, it has to operate similar to a free market otherwise it will collapse. Perpetually charging $60 for old games is a pipe dream. The market won''t support it.

Good point there in the last paragraph. We could liken it to a gold mine, where all the easy pickings get taken first and then it gets harder and harder to come up with anything worthwhile. Similarly, it takes more effort to devise truly new games.

Not that I would know, personally, but the theory makes sense to me.

While I'm in the mood for reminiscing, the last PC game I ever spent any time with (though that was LOTS of time) was Gary Grigsby's "Second Front," on my Amstrad PC6400. But after that PC games seemed (from my perspective) to devolve from high-concept strategic simulations to first-person shooters -- basically (IMHO) more complex and sophisticated versions of Space Invaders or Pacman. Strategic- and operational-level simulations appeared to go by the wayside, and I haven't paid much attention to PC gaming since. For all I know there could have been a renaissance, but if so then I've totally missed it.

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA, 18 June 2013 - 01:29 PM.


#3245
JorgeA

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New Dvorak column just out. Seems to have done a 180 from the last one here ...

[...]

... I wonder if he is reading this thread? Anyway, here is the latest ...

The NSA's Surveillance Will Devastate Commerce ( John C. Dvorak PC Magazine 2013-06-17 )

... and this one makes a brilliant point in light of all the recent breaking news ...

But we've been missing one important aspect of all this. These programs, all in the name of supposedly stopping terrorism, will severely hurt the American economy as foreign sales will challenge American products.

What foreign government, agency, or corporation in its right mind would buy Microsoft Office 360, for instance, if it suspects that every memo written will float up to the Microsoft/NSA cloud to be scrutinized by some "analyst" for unknown reasons. And Google Docs is no better.

What overseas id*** would use any of these services? Who would create a Facebook account? Who would use any American instant messaging system?

Recall that one of al Qaeda's goals is to destroy the U.S. economy. If all this snooping and spying ends up harming (let alone destroying) the U.S. economy, then what does logic say about the agencies involved?

As the saying goes, "The road to he!! is paved with good intentions."

--JorgeA

#3246
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The only thing surprising about PRISM is its eventually actually getting in the news... unless, of course, it's all a smoke-screen hiding even bigger things...

:ph34r:

--JorgeA

#3247
JorgeA

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Does anybody have inside or other additional info on this quote? It starts almost exactly 8 minutes into episode 39 of This Week in Enterprise Tech, during a discussion of Windows 8.1. (Host: Fr. Robert Ballecer. Guest: Brian Chee.)

RB: Cheever, let me toss over to you here. You've been playing with Windows 8 quite a bit, and you've played with the Metro interface. You've played with the new Desktop interface. Do you think that this is enough -- just simply adding a Start Button to Windows 8, does that entice enough people into thinking, "Well, it's close enough to Windows 7 that I can now use them interchangeably"?

BC: No, no, not quite. I go back two years when the Reviewers' Workshop happened and we started learning about Windows 8 for the first time, and we all got very excited because they're promising us the ability that when we did the install, that we could choose Desktop only, or we could choose Desktop with Metro -- or we could choose Command Line only, meaning kernel only, which was very very exciting, especially for the OEMs, especially for the people that wanted to put their own GUIs on there for custom kiosks, custom instruments. Could you imagine a kernel as stable as Windows 8 finally being able to stabilize some medical equipment, or gas pumps, or kiosks -- you know, how may kiosks have you gone to that had the Blue Screen of Death on it? <laughter>

[emphasis added]

That would be quite a revelation, that early on Microsoft was promising that you could install Windows 8 without Metro. Breaking that promise can only have contributed to the anger and disappointment that has met the version of Windows 8 that eventually got released.

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA, 18 June 2013 - 08:43 PM.


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CharlotteTheHarlot

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Does anybody have inside or other additional info on this quote? It starts almost exactly 8 minutes into episode 39 of This Week in Enterprise Tech, during a discussion of Windows 8.1. (Host: Fr. Robert Ballecer. Guest: Brian Chee.)

RB: Cheever, let me toss over to you here. You've been playing with Windows 8 quite a bit, and you've played with the Metro interface. You've played with the new Desktop interface. Do you think that this is enough -- just simply adding a Start Button to Windows 8, does that entice enough people into thinking, "Well, it's close enough to Windows 7 that I can now use them interchangeably"?

BC: No, no, not quite. I go back two years when the Reviewers' Workshop happened and we started learning about Windows 8 for the first time, and we all got very excited because they're promising us the ability that when we did the install, that we could choose Desktop only, or we could choose Desktop with Metro -- or we could choose Command Line only, meaning kernel only, which was very very exciting, especially for the OEMs, especially for the people that wanted to put their own GUIs on there for custom kiosks, custom instruments. Could you imagine a kernel as stable as Windows 8 finally being able to stabilize some medical equipment, or gas pumps, or kiosks -- you know, how may kiosks have you gone to that had the Blue Screen of Death on it? <laughter>

[emphasis added]

That would be quite a revelation, that early on Microsoft was promising that you could install Windows 8 without Metro. Breaking that promise can only have contributed to the anger and disappointment that has met the version of Windows 8 that eventually got released.

Agreed. It sounds like the OEMs were led down a primrose path and believed the next Windows would not cause upheaval, but quite the contrary, be the proverbial shot in the arm. I'm not sure what conference he is talking about, it might be a workshop at //build/ 2011 which is also around the first time I remember hearing about this disaster, it was summer 2011 ...

Live from Microsoft's Windows 8 preview event at Computex 2011! ( EnGadget 2011-06-01 )

Previewing “Windows 8” ( Microsoft 2011-06-01 )

10:28AM The tiles that you see on the Start screen are live. "They represent your apps, your people, your contacts, the things that you care most about."

Posted Image
( Source: EnGadget )


For the record, there were earlier mentions we all heard about that previous January, but as far as I can remember the crazy interface and the destruction of Windows wasn't made public until that summer //build/ event. These articles are 5 months earlier ...

Microsoft confirms ARM support is coming in Windows, will play nice with SoCs too ( EnGadget 2011-01-05 )

Microsoft Announces Support of System on a Chip Architectures From Intel, AMD, and ARM for Next Version of Windows ( Microsoft 2011-01-05 )

CES: Windows to run on ARM chips, says Microsoft ( ZDNet 2011-01-06 )

Posted Image
( Source: EnGadget )

That last picture is from CES ( Consumer Electronics Show ) and if you look closely it is a Windows 8 build 6.2.something. It is obviously the desktop and the sharp corners are already there.


EDIT: typo

Edited by CharlotteTheHarlot, 19 June 2013 - 01:16 AM.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


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CharlotteTheHarlot

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Huawei chairman hints at Nokia acquisition, ditching Windows Phone [Update] ( NeoWin 2013-06-18 )

The commenters are surprisingly calm about this story. Or maybe they are petrified. :lol: Whatever. But it certainly is a very strange thing for a company honcho to be blabbing about. It did send the stock price of Nokia up, and that alone would cause a stir from the SEC if they had some jurisdiction over this Chinese company. Imagine if he ( Huawei chairman ) or his friends held a big block of Nokia shares! This would fall under "Pump and Dump" market manipulation. Anyway, the commenters feel assured that Microsoft would fly in to save the day and buy Nokia first. They certainly have enough cash, but so do others like Google. And Apple at last count has at least twice as much cash on hand. This should be an interesting year for Nokia. I'd guess they have a 50-50 chance of existing into 2014. I imagine the next two to three reporting periods will tell the tale.



Skype video messaging exits preview, still not on Windows Phone ( NeoWin 2013-06-18 )

Skype launches video-messaging service on Android, Blackberry and iOS devices ( TechSpot 2013-06-18 )

Am I the only one thinking someone at Microsoft really is trying to kill Windows Phone. :yes:



Always-on voice controlled smartphones to appear in 2014 ( TechSpot 2013-06-18 )

Citing multiple sources, GottaBeMobile reports that LG has plans to release a smartphone with always-on voice activation as soon as next year. Reportedly, smartphones armed with the technology will respond only to the owner's voice and may require just a simple "hello" to begin processing voice input.


Obviously this is about phones but here is the part that matters and needs to be stuffed down the throats of MicroZealots and MetroTards promoting the wonders of Xbox and Kinect ...

Buttonless (and touchless) voice activation has always presented a few challenges to handset makers, namely battery power (any feature that is always on requires some level of awareness) and separating noise -- like conversations and road noise -- from deliberate voice commands.


So, the MicroZealots and MetroTards are very conveniently willing to overlook wasted power on optional luxuries in the case of Xbox and Kinect, but are quick to disparage Aero and other frills that normal people enjoy on their personal computers that have no battery in the first place ( and that includes laptops which are often plugged in ). Has even one MicroZealot or MetroTard criticized Microsoft for this Xbox Kinect audio polling? It is a frill that merely lets the gamer sit on their butt without having to get up and press a button! FWIW: I'm absolutely not against such a feature as long as the user wants it. But the hypocrisy is maddening to me. They use power savings as the excuse to kill desirable visual effects on desktop Windows but ignore wasted power on their game system. And not a peep from their enablers.



Windows Azure now used by over 50 percent of Fortune 500 companies ( NeoWin 2013-06-18 )

And the federal government thanks you for your business! :lol:


EDIT: clarity

Edited by CharlotteTheHarlot, 19 June 2013 - 01:16 AM.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


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CharlotteTheHarlot

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Were Xbox One E3 Demos Powered by Windows 7 and Nvidia Graphics? ( Maximum PC 2013-06-17 )

Update 12:30 PM

Or maybe not. A developer for Twisted Pixel's LocoCycle claims that his game was the only one of the bunch running on a PC, and that the choice of hardware was "solely [Twisted Pixel's] decision," not Microsoft's. That would certainly explain a few things, and hopefully blunt those pitchforks and douse the torches.


Not sure I'm buying this. The picture they supply sure looks like more than one PC under those cabinets. Surely they must have pictures of actual in-use Xbox systems to prove their point?



Analyst: 'The entire future of the Xbox business is in question' ( NeoWin 2013-06-18 )

( This was probably mentioned earlier, but I just wanted to get the title of the article on the record. ) Not going over well with the fanboys :lol: I still wonder why they even bothered getting into consoles at all. It is never going to be a huge money maker, and it led to destruction of Microsoft PC games like Flight Simulator, a true signature title for them. The worst part is that it is in direct conflict to a huge segment of PC users. If Windows had been broken off into a firewalled company operating with full autonomy and with no concern for other Microsoft products ( creating a truly level playing field for all software, like an operating system is supposed to ) then all these side projects wouldn't ring alarm bells.



The judge who tried to break up Microsoft in 2000 passes away ( NeoWin 2013-06-18 )

In 2000, Judge Jackson ruled that Microsoft must be split into two companies; one company would handle Windows and the other would run the rest of Microsoft's software products. However, it was discovered later that Jackson was interviewed by journalists during the trial and before he rendered his verdict.

Jackson's comments to those reporters included his opinion of Microsoft founder Bill Gates, which Jackson said had "a Napoleonic concept of himself". In 2001, the Court of Appeals in Washington ruled that Jackson's statements to the press gave the impression of bias and removed him from the case, while also overturning his ruling. Later, the DOJ decided to settle with Microsoft, rather than insist on its breakup. The final settlement was made official in 2002.


Boy, in hindsight this Judge seems to have gotten it exactly right. Pity he didn't critique Ballmer too. :lol:

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...





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