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Windows 8 - Deeper Impressions


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#3401
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Loose ends from the previous week or two ... Miscellaneous ( continued ) ...


Internet Explorer 11 Will Use Your GPU to Make Everything Fast ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-01 )

Yeah, yeah. Can anyone tell me exactly what is so slow in a web browser that the GPU is needed? Don't get me wrong because I'm not against it, I just want to know what the heck is meriting this dubious feature? YouTube? Actually I know this is just another planned obsolescence strategy so it is a moot point, I just wish more people would figure it out. BTW: Another outright hypocrisy by Microsoft is pointed out by commenters. If you decide to go with the GPU it is unavoidable that the power cost ( which means dollars, heat and electricity ) must increase. This flies right in the face of the bogus Windows 8 streamlining for power savings, such as the removal of all frills like Aero glassy transparency. So we have crystal clear proof of self-serving lying once again.


TechSpot Subscriptions and Licensing ( technet.microsoft.com )

Microsoft to retire TechNet subscription model for IT professionals ( TechSpot 2013-07-01 )

Microsoft killing off TechNet subscriptions ( Ars Technica 2013-07-01 )

Microsoft you are blowing it ( SBS Diva Blog 2013-07-02 )

Microsoft to stop new TechNet subscriptions after August 31st ( NeoWin 2013-07-02 )

I can't believe anyone is really defending this, but there are a handful. Well we sure know what the answer to the question of who they are going to p!ss off next is, don't we? This time it is the Microsoft professional community, the important one that exists beyond users and developers. This is that base that actually supports Windows, the folks that have been applying string and ductape to this Rube Goldberg machine all along. These are the people that save the phone calls to Microsoft support, so this is one of the dumbest moves in history. I guess it's time to re-up one last time ( before August 31st ) and load up on all the images and get that last extremely reduced set of keys. Might as well before their transformation into just another toy software maker, and a footnote in history, is complete.


DirectX 11.2 an Xbox One and Windows 8.1 Exclusive ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-02 )

We can’t say we’re particularly surprised by the announcement since Microsoft is clearly hoping this exclusivity will increase sales of the upcoming Xbox One console and motivate gamers to make the switch over to Windows 8.1.


Microsoft once again presses ahead using planned obsolescence to lure victims into an operating system "upgrade". 'We care deeply for our customers' - said Microsoft never. The only problem is that there is a greater chance now that people might just not care anymore about Direct-X. So this dog might not hunt anymore.


New AMD Beta Driver Drops Windows XP Support ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-01 )

Son of a ... :realmad: That's right, AMD has been sipping the Koolaid. Microsoft wants Windows XP dead. No doubt in my mind whatsoever that this is coordinated. AMD got the big contract for APU chips for Xbox and this was the catch. Count on it. Rather a shame to read so many ignorant comments at a normally sane Tom's Hardware though, ah well, children. But no more proof is needed about this collusion than what one great commenter said ...

They support Vista (4% of PCs according to wikipedia), Apple (6%), Linux (2%), Windows 8 (4%), but they drop Windows XP (32%). Very interesting decision from AMD...


Yep. :yes: No possible reason to write off 1/3 of all possible customers, unless Microsoft put you up to it. Busted! This is a great opportunity for people to make their voices heard. Email them, call the support numbers, make them waste time and money discussing it. Tell them not to collude with a convicted monopolist that was set to be broken up because of predatory and self-serving tactics. Put your money to work, get nVidia next time and Intel and most importantly let them know what you did. They are now co-conspirators.


Microsoft sues Atlanta-based company over 'unauthorized' software sales ( NeoWin 2013-07-03 )

The lawsuit also claims that in April of 2013, an investigator that worked for Microsoft bought computers from VertexPC that had unauthorized copies of its Windows XP installed. Microsoft is looking for damages as well as any profits that VertexPC has made from sales of Microsoft's software.


'Nuff said.


Doug Engelbart, inventor of the computer mouse, dies at 88 ( TechSpot 2013-07-03 )

Inventor of the computer mouse dies ( NeoWin 2013-07-03 )

Douglas C. Engelbart, computer visionary and inventor of the mouse, dies at 88 ( PC Gamer 2013-07-04 )

So what's the tie-in to Windows 8 or Metro? Well aside from the fact that it is a shame that this pioneer lived to see his patent expire and then get pounced upon and milked by other companies like Microsoft who design nothing and exploit everything, and aside from the fact that he had to witness Microsoft raising a generation of MetroTards who would rather fingerpaint on the computer interface, well there's no tie-in at all. :lol:

Seriously, this man's passing should be marked by two things: {1} appreciation for quite a forward looking invention way back in 1963 ( :blink: ) that is so ubiquitious that it sold billions of units which very few things do, and {2} sadness from reflecting upon the cut-throat tech industry chock of thieves and exploiters like Apple and Microsoft, who like the borg assimilated this person's intellectual property into their collectives. Engelbart got the patent in 1970 and it "ran out" in 1987, but I can find no explanation why it was not at least the usual 20 years ( and that is some wicked poor timing for that expiration date ). There is some kind of amazing backstory here to be written yet. Especially that critical mid-1980's era where both Microsoft and Apple capitalized on a whole slew of other people's inventions around the personal computer GUI, including Mr. Engelbart's mouse already in use at Xerox PARC ( interestingly, one Wikipedia page says: "Several of his researchers became alienated from him and left his organization for Xerox PARC..." which tells me they took it with them ) so the inventor seems to have been shafted multiple times. Regardless, today we should remember that the title of that TV movie "Pirates of Silicon Valley" was very much understating things.

EDIT: typos(s)

Edited by CharlotteTheHarlot, 05 July 2013 - 05:00 AM.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...



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#3402
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Loose ends from the previous week or two ... Security, Privacy and Cloud related ...


SSL encrypted communications intercepted and stored by PRISM ( TechSpot 2013-06-26 )

In addition to collecting standard unencrypted communication, PRISM is also gathering and storing mass quantities of SSL (secure sockets layer) encrypted data for later cryptanalysis. Netcraft reports that this large volume of data is logged so that if an SSL private key later becomes available through a variety of means, the entire batch of data collected from a particular site could be decrypted.

Private keys can be obtained through a number of means: a court order, social engineering, an attack against the website, or through cryptanalysis. Once exposed, a single key can decrypt the entire site’s worth of data.


Yep, that sounds like a workable, logical and well-thought out plan to me. And it has been executed flawlessly. And remind me who is in charge of certificates again? My friends, we've been had.


FDA seizes 9,600 domains and $41 million from illegal online pharmacies ( TechSpot 2013-06-27 )

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week took down 9,600 websites that illegally sold “potentially dangerous and unapproved” prescription drugs online. The FDA issued regulatory warnings to the site owners, and seized the offending websites along with $41 million of illegal medicine.


The FDA with Internet policing powers? How wonderful. I don't automatically jump for joy when I read these stories these days. The Mega fiasco was similar as it was painted as saving someone from someone else. Unfortunately that was about saving Big Hollywood and Big Technology ( alleged pirated software and movies ). So what exactly do we got here then? Saving Big Medicine? That's what I would guess from those keywords “potentially dangerous and unapproved”. The old Internet is quickly shaping up to be policed for those with the deepest wallets, the highest bidder. Once that occurs our Internet for all practical purposes becomes their Internet.


Verizon now covering 500 markets with LTE, VoLTE coming in 2014 ( NeoWin 2013-06-27 )

Verizon states that there are now more than 298 million people covered by LTE in the US which accounts for 95% of the population; 99% of Verizon’s 3G network is now also covered by LTE.


And Big Brother thanks you for your business. :yes: But seriously, Verizon. :blink: After all the spying stories and their fiberoptic pipeline right into the spymaster headquarters. How do you monitor 300+ million people? It's easy if you put your mind to it. Just set up a handful of trusted ISP's and offload your dirty work to them. You may now notice there is a thread running through all these stories, and believe me, these are but the tip of the iceberg.


Reject DRM and you risk walling off parts of the web, says W3C chief ( ZDNet 2013-06-27 )

Proposals to provide a hook for DRM-protected media within HTML are necessary to help prevent scenarios such as movie studios removing films from the web in a bid to protect them from piracy, said Dr Jeff Jaffe, CEO of the World Wide Web Consortium.

Fail to do so, he said, and there is a danger that such media will only be available via native apps, rather than the browser.

[...]

Ultimately, Jaffe believes it is in the interest of everybody that protected content remains available on the web, and that EME is a compromise that will make this possible.

"The concern that we have is the premium content that owners are protecting using DRM will end up being forever severed from the web," Jaffe told ZDNet at the Cloud World Forum in London.

"We would like the web platform to be a universal platform. We don't think it's good when content finds its way into walled gardens or into closed apps."


Thank you W3C for helping us get our minds right. :no: What a dolt. He goes on to worry about walled-gardens, consoles for example that might instead be used if the web doesn't itself build in DRM. Of course web browsers and website designers who are too busy to standardize core functionality like displaying a web page correctly and will somehow find the time to incorporate DRM to satisfy Big Hollywood and Big Media. W3C, how far they have fallen.


Researchers see through walls with Wi-Fi ( TechSpot 2013-06-28 )

MIT researchers have demonstrated the application of using Wi-Fi signals to track the movements, locations and number of people inside buildings. Dubbed Wi-Vi, the inexpensive and portable "through-the-wall" radar system could have practical applications in law enforcement, search and rescue operations and home security, even if it does present some potential privacy concerns.


Well at least it's not as bad as it sounds ... yet. It is kind of a pseudo-radar. Probably no-one will find it useful, well, except maybe government spooks. But why trouble themselves if they can just get to your Kinect?

The main concern going forward should be in the whole uPnP ( remember when that was considered bad? ) and new router interfaces that are adaptable for use by external devices. Yes, external. Outside your network, outside your security bubble. The hook is all the promise of watching a baby monitor from work, a webcam, having Metro Tiles that show these things, etc. Sheeple really go for this kind of thing, even if it means busting down all the security walls created along the way. And bust them they will. Windows, Router firmware, firewalls, everything. Duhfaults will be set, ports will be open, remote access will be enabled, it has to be because the baby monitor and webcam makers will insist on it. And hackers everywhere will thank them for it.


Facebook Android App Found Collecting Phone Numbers Without User Consent ( Maximum PC 2013-06-30 )

The latest version of Symantec’s Norton Mobile Security tool came out on Wednesday and got down to work straight away, flagging the Facebook app as being a privacy risk ...

[...]

“The first time you launch the Facebook application, even before logging in, your phone number will be sent over the Internet to Facebook servers,” Symantec said in a blog post. “You do not need to provide your phone number, log in, initiate a specific action, or even need a Facebook account for this to happen.”

On being confronted on the issue by Symantec, Facebook promised to fix the issue in the next update (already in beta, thankfully). Further, it denied using or processing the phone numbers in anyway, adding that they have now been deleted from its servers.


Brazen stealing or accidental data collection by Facebook? Does it matter? I say stealing and they would have gotten away with it except for those pesky kids Symantec ( wait, what? :blink: ). Finally a good accomplishment by Symantec.

However there is a real problem here, bigger than this case, and it was achieved in baby steps with Microsoft leading the way. At some point it became an acceptable standard operating procedure for communications to be sent from your computer to them ( phoning home ), naturally under the guise of an operating system function, most importantly WITHOUT a prompt or notification. They created a new normal where they can "take" stuff from your PC completely at will and completely under their control. This wiretapping is bad enough but they even use your Phone / Cable / DSL / Fiber / Satellite connection and bandwidth, your CPU cycles and electricity in the process. If someone came into your house and planted a bug or used your phone or electricity they would be in trouble, but instead we have somehow approved of this radically more efficient mechanism and we actually pay for it in cash. These precedents of unapproved communications taking place on our computers at the behest of Microsoft and countless 3rd parties is not even questioned by anyone. So again, why wouldn't Facebook brazenly steal a few bytes here and there. And how about that scoffing response they gave.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3403
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Loose ends from the previous week or two ... Security, Privacy and Cloud related ( continued ) ...


Encryption defeated wiretaps for the first time ever in 2012 ( TechSpot 2013-07-01 )

A recent report from the U.S. Administrative Office of the Courts reveals that, for the first time, encryption prevented government officials from deciphering communications obtained through wiretaps.

[...]

In 1997, FBI Director Louis Freeh told Congress, “all of law enforcement is also in total agreement on one aspect of encryption. The widespread use of uncrackable encryption will devastate our ability to fight crime and prevent terrorism,” reports Wired.


Well I ain't buying this bullcrap at all. This is disinformation. And a ruse to get more powers. What I think they're saying is that FBI and law enforcement might have been thwarted, since they are not equipped with a black budget and mountains full of computers. Now here is a prediction I think you can bank on : expect legislation to outlaw any strong encryption. No-one would have dreamed it possible a few years ago, but the precedents are now in place. They already outlawed strong encryption for export. They have outlawed "circumvention" in your own private property ( DVD's, Satellite and Cable boxes, etc ). They have only the lonely PC device now to target, and target it they will. We are reaching a fundamental crossroad now. Will everyone sit around playing Angry Birds and let it happen?


New ICANN agreement requires domain registrars to verify user identity ( TechSpot 2013-07-01 )

Under the new rule, domain registrars will be required to verify either the e-mail address of phone number of users that sign up for a new domain within 15 days of applying. If a user fails to do so after the allotted time, the registrar has been instructed to suspend the registration until verification is taken care of.

Furthermore, registrars will be required to keep detailed records on customers for up to two years after a registration has been canceled. This includes information like the credit card that was used to register the domain, we’re told. Also, registrars must keep a record of the IP address used to sign up for the domain for up to 180 days while users are required to update contact information within seven days of making any changes.


This is another brazen move against anonymity and it is no coincidence that it comes on the heels of the spying news. Governments are making a play for the Internet now. Sales taxes are in the pipeline. They think the party is over, and they just may be right. The people are mostly sheeple and are apparently welcoming their new overlords.

Speaking of sheeple, listen to the clueless conclusion the TechSpot author comes too ...

It would seem that ICANN is hoping to deter individuals from setting up websites that would contain unlawful material or perhaps sites that would facilitate the sale of illegal goods. The changes will also ensure that WHOIS data is more accurate and reliable ...


That's what you take away from this? Illegal goods? Accurate WhoIs? Go back to sleep. ~sigh~


AT&T Says It Can Accurately Track P2P-Shared Content ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-01 )

TorrentFreak has discovered a patent filed by AT&T ...

[...]

According to the patent, the system scans each content title that is uploaded and downloaded via torrent on the network. Titles that are downloaded over a predetermined threshold will be added to a list, ordered from most popular to least popular, in the company's database. It then downloads the actual torrent to verify that the content listed inside (content signature) verifies with the content title stored in the database.

The system can also identify each unique user that has downloaded the content title in the list. It then pretends to be a torrent client and contacts the user's own client to request a download. A successful connection means that the unique user has actually downloaded the content title. Busted.


Yup, it's all about torrents, NOT. We now have the ISPs exerting government approved snooping in the service of Big Hollywood. Oh wait, we've had that for quite a while now. So this is the next step, still disguised as serving the greater good looking after Hollywood intellectual properties, but actually putting names and places on download events. Okay, here's a question. If our government cannot even check and see someone's library records, the books they read, etc, how can this even be remotely acceptable? I have no love for crooks, torrents or pirates, but at this point I would take them in a heartbeat over the Big Brother that government and the sheeple are putting into place.


Ubisoft Hacked, User Accounts Compromised ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-02 )

Ubisoft website hacked, account information compromised ( TechSpot 2013-07-03 )

Ubisoft accounts hacked, email addresses and passwords compromised ( PC Gamer 2013-07-03 )

"Credentials were stolen and used to illegally access our online network. We can’t go into specifics for security reasons," the company said. "To our knowledge, no other personal information (phone numbers, physical addresses etc. was accessed)."

[...]

Given that credit card information was not accessible, Ubisoft customers should likely be worried about hackers retrieving their information and hacking into other gaming services that do contain credit card information. Currently there's no evidence that this intrusion is related to any other game company’s previous security incidents.


Ah the joys of the cloud. The hacked company isn't important, nor is what they took. The point is obvious though, another day, another hacking. I'm pretty sure now that we can just stop reporting these events completely, because it would be far simpler to just make a list of companies that have NOT been penetrated. Can anyone think of any example? Anyone? Bueller? I got nothin'. :no:


IIP bureau of U.S. State Department spent $630,000 on Facebook ‘likes’ ( TechSpot 2013-07-03 )

I just threw this one in to make everyone even more angry ( USA citizens obviously ). So, just to rub salt in the wounds from all the domestic spying against ourselves which we masochistically pay for, other government agencies are on a social spending spree! Isn't that just great? And what are the chances really that this is the extent of it all? The real number blown by all taxpayer funded bureaucrats will be in the millions. I don't suppose we could prevail on all these companies taking our money to consider reporting all the government entities wasting our money on their social sites?


[Update] Xbox Live currently experiencing a service disruption ( NeoWin 2013-07-03 )

Xbox Live was Dead. So how's that cloud thingy supposed to work again? Anyway, it is already restored so all connections are working. For now. Until next time. Bwahahahaha! ( evil laugh ! )


Microsoft, former Windows head Sinofsky agree to $14.2 million retirement package ( NeoWin 2013-07-03 )

The article details the severance package Sinofsky receives for either getting fired by Ballmer or for getting fired by Ballmer :lol: ( Stevie left shortly after the Windows 8 launch, on a Monday night a week and a half before Thanksgiving with no warning for Wall Street ). He is to receive some $14.2 million according to NeoWin, with some strings attached ...

Sinofsky won't get that amount all at once; Microsoft will give him the shares over a period of time that will end in August 2016.

In return, Sinofsky agrees to not take any new job offers "at certain competitors" until after Dec. 31, 2013.


Thanks to this hush money no-one including Wall Street shareholders will get to learn the truth of what is going on up in clownsville for at least three more years. Well unless he gets offered a book deal worth more than that substantial bribe he receives if he stays quiet.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3404
Formfiller

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Loose ends from the previous week or two ... Miscellaneous ( continued ) ...


EDITORIAL: Microsoft's Customer Relationship Status: It's Complicated. ( NeoWin 2013-06-29 )

An editorial by a NeoWinner and quite a fine one at that! Good writing and contrary to the screams and cries in the comments, he's very accurate IMHO. Here's a good zinger ...

The Start screen and interface paradigm itself were a product of this Sinofsky style rationale. The Mark Twain attributed Disraeli method of “lies, damned lies and statistics” has never been fruitful in product development. Microsoft Windows 8 was no exception; thus Sinofsky’s retreat to academia where this scientific method belongs.


:lol: I won't spoil it. He's good and he's ticking off the MetroTards and MicroZealots. Read it for yourself!



Speaking of good stuff from Neowin:

http://www.neowin.ne...comment-2254891

#3405
Formfiller

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Dot Matrix is flailing:

http://www.neowin.ne...comment-2252515

Why do they need to? What is so different about clicking on a tile, than an icon? They don't need to split the SKUs up, there's nothing wrong with Windows 8 on the desktop, and as Windows 8.1 shows, things will advance on.

If you're so hurt over using Modern apps, don't use them. Click to boot straight to the desktop, and move on.

Now, how long before the boss pulls down this article?


Quite telling, huh. What "boss"?

1. He assumes everyone who doesn't praise Windows 8 is a counter-shill (since he is one himself), and has a "boss", too.
2. He means the boss of Neowin - so he expects that critical articles towards Microsoft get pulled on Neowin. Well, he isn't so far off here.

His mojo isn't strong like it was before. I guess Windows 8.1 diminished his motivation somewhat. He argued against many features which are now included in 8.1 (start button, boot-to-desktop). Sure, those appeasements are ridiculous compared to Windows 7, but it must be still a kick in the balls when the mothership betrays your hard earned shilling.

Dot Matrix is finding out that being a shill is not as glamorous as he thought.

Edited by Formfiller, 04 July 2013 - 04:40 AM.


#3406
JorgeA

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BTW, has anybody else wondered about the timing of the original announcement last year that people should stop using Gagdets for "security" reasons? It was right around the time that Win8 was coming out (within a month, IIRC). I've always suspected that trying to eliminate the Gadgets was an attempt to make the Vista/Windows 7 Desktop look that much more static

--JorgeA


Of course it was.

I had an argument about this on Channel9:

http://channel9.msdn...house/Dick-move

The fanboys didn't like it one bit and flailed around with ad hominems.

It's one of my "how to handle the boyz"-threads.

So, great minds think alike!! ;)

I have to hand it to you, though -- you really know how to deal with these fanatics. For me, it's hard to bear the stress and annoyance of hearing this cr*p, especially like the first one:

Never used any gadgets, so I really couldn't care less.

I just can't fathom that "I'm not a Jew, so I don't care" type of argument. :rolleyes: It's an emotional response to a rational line of discussion, and I've always found it to be so maddeningly irrelevant as to not know what to do with it. And yet, some (many?) people do approach discussions that way, so OTOH I can't just leave it unanswered lest they think that I'm conceding their "point." Hence, the stress.

--JorgeA

#3407
JorgeA

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GUIs: The computing revolution that turned us into cranky idiots ( ZDNet 2013-06-28 )

The author writes a pretty good historical article, and is doing fine until he flat-out lies about Windows 95, so I guess his whole post must be brought into question.

Yeah, toward the end it really degenerates into name-calling ("cranky idiots") and the writer comes off as arrogant and patronizing. And then we see his bio paragraph:

Jason Perlow, Sr. Technology Editor at ZDNet, is a technologist with over two decades of experience integrating large heterogeneous multi-vendor computing environments in Fortune 500 companies. Jason is currently a Partner Technology Strategist with Microsoft Corp. His expressed views do not necessarily represent those of his employer.

Except that, of course, in this case they do. So he's a paid employee for Microsoft. That gives us some insight into what he wrote and why.

One other point. If PC users became "simpletons," then due to its own GUI Microsoft has played a huge role in this devolution. Yet somehow Perlow is using this to argue for further simplifying the UI...?!? Does not compute (so to speak).

Finally, if Perlow doesn't understand the difference between "change" and "improvement," then I have to question whether Microsoft is getting its money's worth from the salary they pay him.

OK, I couldn't resist adding one more thing -- all right, two more things, both excellent observations in the comments section:

For all the talk about GUI's, the one thing I did not see in the article was human factor testing. Xerox certainly did it, and found that text labels were better than icon's, but somehow we forgot that. Apple did it, and found that reducing the transitions from mouse to keyboard and back improved accuracy and ease of use, but it looks like we forgot that.

Personally, I can't believe anyone did any human factors testing on Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 on a desktop. It may look cool, but it fails in both of the examples from the early days I used, and in many more obscure studies since then.


Most importantly, it was never what the UI is, but it was whether the UI was well designed.
As a consequence of this, whoever advised Microsoft to adopt the same UI across different platforms and form factors in fact sent them towards the cliff.


Another great set of links, BTW. How do you manage to put all of these together so quickly? It would take me half an afternoon to create some of your digests.

--JorgeA

#3408
JorgeA

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Yup, it's all about torrents, NOT. We now have the ISPs exerting government approved snooping in the service of Big Hollywood. Oh wait, we've had that for quite a while now. So this is the next step, still disguised as serving the greater good looking after Hollywood intellectual properties, but actually putting names and places on download events. Okay, here's a question. If our government cannot even check and see someone's library records, the books they read, etc, how can this even be remotely acceptable? I have no love for crooks, torrents or pirates, but at this point I would take them in a heartbeat over the Big Brother that government and the sheeple are putting into place.

:thumbup :thumbup

I totally agree -- the cure is worse than the disease.


IIP bureau of U.S. State Department spent $630,000 on Facebook ‘likes’ ( TechSpot 2013-07-03 )

I just threw this one in to make everyone even more angry ( USA citizens obviously ). So, just to rub salt in the wounds from all the domestic spying against ourselves which we masochistically pay for, other government agencies are on a social spending spree! Isn't that just great? And what are the chances really that this is the extent of it all? The real number blown by all taxpayer funded bureaucrats will be in the millions. I don't suppose we could prevail on all these companies taking our money to consider reporting all the government entities wasting our money on their social sites?

If we could get the NSA folks to spend their time at the office "liking" stuff instead of what they're actually doing, I'd consider that tax money well spent... :D

--JorgeA

#3409
HalloweenDocument12

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Dvorak's philosophy on duopoly. I take it a little farther myself, and play down the Apple-Microsoft faux competition. It is a duopoly but not a competition. It is more like the crips and bloods dividing up the territory and scrupulously avoiding trespassing each others' turf, ever. They have never competed, until Surface. Ever.


I agree in a practical sense that Apple never competed with Microsoft, but part of the sickness of 90s Apple ecosystem (employees, writers, fans) was that they thought Apple would destroy Microsoft. Steve Jobs addressed this at 1997 Macworld, where it was announced he was taking over again, to a downright hostile audience (though they softened up a bit by the time of the index linked).

Ah, just what the doctor ordered - an ever-changing codebase. Now there is a real plan for stability.


Worked for Linux! Wait...erm, um, hmmm.

Microsoft calls it an update, I call it a placebo.


After 15 years or so of receiving 20-30 "critical updates" in semi-monthly batches, one does have to wonder exactly what they do.

what really sold Windows 95 were long filenames, FAT32 file system, better multitasking than in Windows 3.1, .LNK shortcuts rather than .PIF ones, and new desktop functionality like putting shortcuts on the desktop.



All that stuff seems to have been forgotten and even assumed as features. FAT32 was absolutely necessary. The hard drive capacity explosion caught FAT16 with its pants down and by 4Q 1995 2 GB partitions with 32K allocation units, the best FAT16 could do without hacks, was beyond end of life. People were also sick of basically having to name files like hex codes.

I had a stable of Windows NT 3.51 users who were irritated that they would be stuck with Program Manager for another year.



Personally I think the real surprise success was NT4. I think everyone knew 95 would be a hit but while NT3 had a growing market it was decidedly a niche product. NT4 was an overnight success and penetrated unforseen markets like computers used for word processing and gamer builds. There were howto sites detailing how to hack in DirectX and drivers into NT 4, and people were spending more on computers that were capable of handling NT. Businesses upgraded quickly, and some of them jumpted directly to NT4 and skipped 9x entirely (though that wasn't always practical).

#3410
JorgeA

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Oh, MS is screwing up yet again.



View 18:40. Apparently only the start button comes back, not the start menu! Also at around 21:00 Thurrott mentions that only the "business versions" will get this.

I've written about this.......:
http://www.msfn.org/...ost__p__1036968


An oldie but a goodie. Starting at about 42:40, Paul Thurrott reveals his personal distaste for the Metro UI and his preference for the Desktop:

Leo Laporte: I'm wondering if the Start Button is enough to assuage their -- don't they really want a Start Menu?

Paul Thurrott: Oh, probably.

LL: That's what I want. I don't want to see Metro! You know, I still have it, and as you saw I launched into it by accident. It's there, and I don't hate it.

PT: That is the way we all use Metro -- by accident.

LL: My Charms are still there, but I don't have to use them. That Start Menu has a nice shutdown button right on it..

***PT: If you have a Surface RT or whatever, the Metro stuff is nice. You know, when I'm on a computer, I use this thing for work, I want to get work done, I want to be efficient. Like you, the Metro stuff is not what I want.***

[...]

PT: People at Microsoft, you should be asking them, maybe this thing really is screwed up. You know, I think when you have this many people questioning what you're doing, you have to have a little bit of introspection. I mean -- I assume this happens, I have no idea what the decision-making process is like over there, but I mean, my God -- you know, there's so much complaining. And hopefully this stuff does happen the way we expect it to.

[...]

PT: It's even more true of Microsoft's customers, 'cause the core customer base really is businesses, isn't it? And them jamming this thing down businesses' throats is so anti-common sense.

LL: Well, at some point you have to say, "Oh, I guess this is more than just a knee-jerk reaction to the change, there is in fact substantive complaints." People are not buying Windows 8...


I'm thinking that the explanation for Thurrott's many apparent 360-degree turns is that he himself actually prefers the Desktop interface, but is resigned to Metro as the inevitable wave of the future.

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA, 04 July 2013 - 11:36 PM.


#3411
HalloweenDocument12

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Oh, Outlook.com/Hotmail finally supports two factor authentication? Thanks for the video.

#3412
Formfiller

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I'm thinking that the explanation for Thurrott's many apparent 360-degree turns is that he himself actually prefers the Desktop interface, but is resigned to Metro as the inevitable wave of the future.

--JorgeA


I think the explanation is that he prefers the Desktop, and his turns to the metro side happen when yet another bribe arrives in the mail box (computers and tablets, software, phones, invitation to conferences.. And maybe even plain money).

Edited by Formfiller, 05 July 2013 - 04:48 AM.


#3413
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More spying:

http://www.lemonde.f...42665_3224.html

Revelations on the French Big Brother

If the revelations about the American espionage program Prism set off a chorus of indignation in Europe, France itself protested only weakly. For two excellent reasons: Paris already knew about it – and it"s doing exactly the same thing. Le Monde is able to disclose that the General Directorate of External Security (the DGSE, or special services) systematically collects the electromagnetic signals emitted by computers and telephones in France, and the flow of signals between France and countries abroad: the entirety of our communications are being spied on. All of our email messages, SMS messages, itemised phone bills and connections to FaceBook and Twitter are then stored for years.
If this immense data base was used just by the DGSE, which operates only outside French borders, it would already be illegal. But the six other intelligence services – among them the Central Directorate of Internal Intelligence, the customs service and the Tracfin anti-money-laundering service – delve into this base daily for the data of interest to them. This takes place discreetly, on the margins of legality and and beyond any serious control. Politicians are perfectly aware of it, but secrecy is the rule.

This French Big Brother, a little brother of the American services, is clandestine. Yet its existence appears discreetly in parliamentary documents. In a report issued on April 30, the eight deputies and senators in the parliamentary intelligence delegation note that "progress has been made since 2008 in the mutualisation of capabilities, notably regarding intelligence of electromagnetic origin, effected by the DGSE for the benefit of the entire intelligence community."

The DGSE thus collects the itemised telephone bills of millions of subscribers – the names of the callers and the called, the place, the date, the duration, the weight of the message. The same goes for email (with the possibility of reading the title of the message), SMS messages, faxes... And all activity on the Internet that takes place via Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, Yahoo... It's what the parliamentary intelligence delegation very aptly calls "intelligence of electromagnetic origin", the equivalent of the NSA's SigInt (signals intelligence).

[..]

This system is obviously of great value in the fight against terrorism. But it allows spying on anyone, any time. The DGSE collects billions of billions of units of data, which are compressed and stored on three floors in the basement of the DGSE headquarters on Boulevard Mortier in Paris.

Bernard Barbier, technical director of the DGSE since 2006, has spoken publicly about this system on two occasions – in 2010 at a symposium on the security of information and communications technology, and to the Association of Reservists in Encryption and Information Security (Arsci). His comments were reported on a few specialised sites, including Bug Brother, a blog by Jean-Marc Manach on lemonde.fr. Mr. Barbier spoke of "the development of a calculator based on FPGA" – Field Programmable Gate Array, or an integrated circuit that may be programmed for logical functions – that is "probably the biggest data processing center in Europe after the English", capable of managing dozens of petaoctets of data, in other words dozens of millions of gigaoctets. The heat emitted by the computers is sufficient to heat all the buildings of the DGSE...


Sounds like yet another intelligence service has full access to Microsoft and friends.

Interesting that Twitter is once again not on the list. They seem to be the only ones to protest on such things. I wonder why? Do they get the least amount of bribe money or something?

Edited by Formfiller, 05 July 2013 - 05:39 AM.


#3414
CharlotteTheHarlot

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I'm thinking that the explanation for Thurrott's many apparent 360-degree turns is that he himself actually prefers the Desktop interface, but is resigned to Metro as the inevitable wave of the future.

I'm still leaning towards the medication see-saw. :lol:

It would be very interesting to chronicle his alternating positions on everything. I mean just pick an obvious one like Microsoft Tiles and cite dated quotes over the past two years since //Build/ 2011. The problem is that it would require quite a bit of time. I just recently noticed that on his site once the older articles fall off the bottom they are lost forever. Then when you use his search it throws them up in a random dated selection. He must be using Bing.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3415
CharlotteTheHarlot

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what really sold Windows 95 were long filenames, FAT32 file system, better multitasking than in Windows 3.1, .LNK shortcuts rather than .PIF ones, and new desktop functionality like putting shortcuts on the desktop.


All that stuff seems to have been forgotten and even assumed as features. FAT32 was absolutely necessary. The hard drive capacity explosion caught FAT16 with its pants down and by 4Q 1995 2 GB partitions with 32K allocation units, the best FAT16 could do without hacks, was beyond end of life. People were also sick of basically having to name files like hex codes.

That poster was correct about almost everything, but FAT32 arrived in the OSR for November 1996, not Win95 RTM. I remember this because we had just set up a bunch of Win95 production machines in a music studio and had to face the possibility of reformat or gamble on the in-place FAT32 converter. Microsoft's reputation on the consumer side was not as solid as NT yet ( if ever ) because the Win3x era was still fresh in all our memories. We reformatted. :lol:

The list of positives for moving to Win95 was simply overwhelming though, and that is his point. In fact it was an extraordinary upgrade, none like it ever since. It lit a fire under Microsoft Windows users because it was an Apple-killer. Not that we wanted them dead, but it ended the envy we all had, that desire for a stable OS, with unlimited program size, unlimited running programs and multiple instances of programs. The shortcut concept with multiple customization options was well thought out. The GUI was icing on the cake because while ProgMan could be tamed into submission with enough fiddling with groups, the Start Menu collapsed it all into a drawer saving real estate on a 14 or 15 inch screen. Long Filenames was very useful but I suspect that people like me who had been doing the 8.3 dance for well over a decade could manage just fine without it, but I certainly didn't complain. It's a shame that ( contrary to laughable current Microsoft propaganda ) no upgrade since has come close to its pure value. Even Win98 was a mostly sideways step once the pluses and minuses were tallied ( the slow down of performance using current processors had begun, and that active desktop demonstrating their instinctive need to blur the lines between online and off ). Win95 was an upgrade with no downside. Not only did it carry forward everything from the previous OS, and not only did it add new features ( not a short bullet list, but a bucket full of new features ), it did all of this without breaking anything for the end-user ( breakage being the trademark feature of every OS upgrade since ). Just getting the Resource Kit book knocked your socks off because it was a two inch thick encyclopedia detailing change after change and really set a new bar for documentation..

If I had to state one potential pitfall that could be described as breakage it would have to be the Plug 'n Pray scenario where cards were not yet flexible enough to use more than a narrow range of resources, resulting in IRQ juggling by the BIOS and/or OS from a working state to a collision state on another reboot. That really sucked and you sometimes simply had to get different cards. In those scenarios I wished there was a workable off switch for PnP allowing manual expert settings of resources ( the Windows Device Manager options are just too limited ) if the cards physically even had jumpers that is. I've argued for static hardware resource management many times, so that on every boot the same IRQs and I/O and Memory addresses were in effect and predictability was preserved, unlike the situation of removing or adding a card and after a reboot and BIOS and OS juggling some new problem pops up. But this horse has clearly left the barn. Plug and Pray won.


I had a stable of Windows NT 3.51 users who were irritated that they would be stuck with Program Manager for another year.


Personally I think the real surprise success was NT4. I think everyone knew 95 would be a hit but while NT3 had a growing market it was decidedly a niche product. NT4 was an overnight success and penetrated unforseen markets like computers used for word processing and gamer builds. There were howto sites detailing how to hack in DirectX and drivers into NT 4, and people were spending more on computers that were capable of handling NT. Businesses upgraded quickly, and some of them jumpted directly to NT4 and skipped 9x entirely (though that wasn't always practical).

It was kind of crappy that NT had that lag every single time with NT 3.1 getting the Program Manager interface years after Window 3.0 and then NT 4.0 getting the new Start Menu GUI well after Win95. Come to think of it, I'll bet this is what is confusing all the MetroTards. They keep talking about some controversy during Win3x to Win95 transition. The only controversies that had merit and were argued in the magazines and on USENET were over differences between NT and 9x. The NT branch kept waiting for the GUI to catch up. The Win9x users were complaining about the half-baked PnP. Somehow this has percolated up into their mindless rants about the Start Menu which had no controversy because it was optional.

There were also complaints about the price of NT, the lack of any publicity, and the memory requirements and the talk already was about "Does Microsoft want it to fail?" that kind of thing. But if you read between the lines it was because the complainers wanted it to succeed and were trying to stop Microsoft from making a blunder. These things are all the opposite from what they are alluding to. They weren't complaining about a horrible new Start Menu. Screw the MetroTards and that dishonest propaganda they are pushing. It's a combination of plain ignorance and outright lying.


EDIT: typo, clarity

Edited by CharlotteTheHarlot, 05 July 2013 - 07:50 AM.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3416
CharlotteTheHarlot

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[ROTT] was a good step up from Wolf3D which was the engine that is was based on. It managed to come out in that gap between Wolf3D and Doom and IIRC, they were first to unlock the Z-axis ( player could move vertically ), and also introduced elevator and jump pads which obviously became the norm ever since. But the best thing was that the designers went for a wild and wacky arsenal of weapons, setting the precedent for so many later games like Quake and Unreal. If I'm not mistaken, they introduced the bazooka, drunk missile, and that great flamethrower thing. It was definitely way ahead of its time, and it's coming back.

Technology-wise, ROTT was an upgrade over Wolf3D and was originally supposed to be another Nazi game, which is evident in the game itself. The project was delayed, though, and Doom beat it to market. ROTT was still awesome, though, and was the best multiplayer FPS of its time. The influence on other multiplayer FPSes like Quake is obvious. ROTT introduced several staple multiplayer modes and had the most total modes at the time and allowed the most players, 11, over the usual 4 or so.

Doom had pseudo Z-axis in that one could move up and down stairs, elevators, etc, but no objects could occupy the same space vertically, so Doom was something like 2.5D. ROTT didn't entirely eliminate this restriction as those platforms were hardcoded spites. As in, literally hex edited into the game because while they figured out how to remove the Z restriction, they couldn't build it into the engine.

ROTT had unique weapons for its time. Doom had introduced the vanilla rocket launcher, plasma gun, and BFG, but ROTT introduced what you mentioned plus the baseball bat (and balls), dog mode, magic wand, god hand, and others I am surely forgetting. It also introduced begging enemies (that would get you back if you didn't kill them). Besides allowing character selection, there were subtle differences between the characters. Another first, I believe, but this is usually attributed to Goldeneye I think, probably due to Oddjob's obvious and extreme advantage.

EDIT: ROTT also introduced modifiable environments (smashing pots, bullet holes) and disintegrating enemies (burning, explosions). Okay, I'll stop now.

Doh, you're right! Doom was out before ROTT. Thanks for that . :thumbup Don't know how I forgot it.

Oh yeah, dog mode! That's what I mean by outside the box thinking. God hand too. And wasn't there a follower mode? I think it was tied to one of the missiles ( I may be mixing it up with Unreal maybe ).

So at the risk of exposing another memory error, tell me one more thing ... Am I recalling the random level generator correctly? ... I think it was RandRott and you ran it standalone, outside the game and it created a new map PAC or WAD or whatever their resource was? I'm stunned that such creative use of automation, especially the randomizing component, has not been exploited since unless I'm mistaken.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3417
JorgeA

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Two perspectives on Windows 8.1:

A. Woody Leonhard reviews what's new, sprinkling in commentary that will warm the hearts of most readers of this thread:

For those who link in the traditional desktop (which, I assume, is 99 percent of Win8 users), the improvements to Windows 8.1 are few and far between. But they are useful, particularly if you want to stay out of tinker-tile hell.

The sham Start button: Man, it bugs me when tech writers and Windows 8 fanboys claim that Win8.1′s new Start button is like what we’re used to in XP/Vista/Win7. It’s not even close. Microsoft put an icon on the far-left side of the taskbar (see Figure 1) that looks like the modern Windows logo. But when you click or tap it, you don’t get Win7′s start menu; as with Windows 8, you’re immediately flipped over to the Metro Start screen.

[emphasis in original]


B. PCWorld makes a list of things that are still "missing" in the preview version:

The simple return of the Start button, even in its bastardized "drop you on the Start screen" form, fixes one of the major interface woes found in the original Windows 8.0 release, especially when paired with the new All Apps button. But Microsoft shouldn't stop there.


Both articles make for good, informative reading.

--JorgeA

#3418
Formfiller

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Wow, the new Opera (NuOpera?) is even more dumbed down than Windows RT.

Their blog is very sinofskytastic now:

http://my.opera.com/desktopteam/blog/

p***ed off commenters and stupid excuses by the devs galore.

Quite interesting how the companies think: Stagnant marketshare - dumb down! Even when it makes no sense. And with Opera it makes even less sense than the NuMicrosoft route MS has chosen: Chrome is the dumbed down browser, Firefox is for the add-on freaks, IE is the "standard" bare-bones one and Opera was the full-featured one. Creating another Chrome makes zero sense, ZERO. Chrome will always be more popular, thanks to Google's financial power and advertising budget. Why should Chrome users switch to... Chrome (Opera branded)? Opera had an established audience, and they are giving it all up. That audience is p***ed, and there surely won't be a surge of Chrome users coming.

The "nu" disease is spreading.

Edited by Formfiller, 05 July 2013 - 11:51 AM.


#3419
jaclaz

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Just for the record, on the "enterprise" side I remember no particular "wows" at Windows 95 (let alone at FAT32).
The .pif vs. .lnk argument is simply senseless.

The "desktop paradigm" was already common in Windows 3.x (at least in my experience).
Remember that any DOS user (in his right mind) would have had at the time two "compulsory" third party softwares:
  • Norton Utilities
  • Norton Commander
and most of them would have had (as soon as it came out) the Norton Desktop, see:
http://www.msfn.org/...72#entry1020072
http://www.msfn.org/...460#entry992460

FAT32 came later than 95, it was first in OSR 2 (which was an OEM only release, i.e. you couldn't have it without having it bundled with new hardware):
http://en.wikipedia....ows_95#Editions

That means (flatly) that FAT32 was NOT available in enterprise before August 1996 and ONLY on new machines.

Again *any* enterprise would have been running NT 3.51 since one year and the real "break through" for them would have been the new interface of NT 4.00.

I remember at the time how the enterprise was (correctly) "forked", "real" machines would be expensive "work PC's" with NT 4.00 and "secretary machines" would be cheap PC's with the bundled Windows 95.


jaclaz

#3420
Formfiller

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Uncanny deja vu:

It was clear from the start that they won't ever steer away from their core plans. That's why Opera developers here only respond to comments that do go in lieu with the new concept of their browser, every comment that is helpful in pushing this new concept further is considered constructive. Every comment that wants old features back is ignored.


http://my.opera.com/...dx=100#comments

There are also some "embrace the change" fools in the comments.

Creepy!

#3421
HalloweenDocument12

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And wasn't there a follower mode? I think it was tied to one of the missiles ( I may be mixing it up with Unreal maybe ).

So at the risk of exposing another memory error, tell me one more thing ... Am I recalling the random level generator correctly? ... I think it was RandRott and you ran it standalone, outside the game and it created a new map PAC or WAD or whatever their resource was? I'm stunned that such creative use of automation, especially the randomizing component, has not been exploited since unless I'm mistaken.


Can't remember whether or not missile following was in the game. But ROTT did have RANDROTT and it worked like you remember, though I believe the first FPS level randomizer was for Wolfenstein in the Super Upgrades Pack, and that one had some sort of GUI while RANDROTT was strictly CLI.

#3422
SIW2

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This is exactly what I have been trying to alert people to :

For you geeks, it will only get worse ...more companies will find innovative ways of ruining the accepted, efficient workflows, just for the sake of money...you will see yet more forced online integration and similar crap cropping everywhere.

Then, it will become subscription based s***, with monthly fees and mandatory online check in ... ads in every program...You will not be able to install programs that were not pre-approved... it will happen slowly, so that people do not resist violently.

If you do not want to end up an anally probed guinea pig in the money labs, you will be wise to boycott this latest Microsoft operating system thing...it is an insult to intelligence, to poor people worldwide, and anyone with a basic sense of decency.

Final grade: FAIL. We're done.


Windows 8.1 review - Still stupendously stupid

#3423
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Wow, the new Opera (NuOpera?) is even more dumbed down than Windows RT.

Their blog is very sinofskytastic now:

http://my.opera.com/desktopteam/blog/

p***ed off commenters and stupid excuses by the devs galore.

Quite interesting how the companies think: Stagnant marketshare - dumb down! Even when it makes no sense. And with Opera it makes even less sense than the NuMicrosoft route MS has chosen: Chrome is the dumbed down browser, Firefox is for the add-on freaks, IE is the "standard" bare-bones one and Opera was the full-featured one. Creating another Chrome makes zero sense, ZERO. Chrome will always be more popular, thanks to Google's financial power and advertising budget. Why should Chrome users switch to... Chrome (Opera branded)? Opera had an established audience, and they are giving it all up. That audience is p***ed, and there surely won't be a surge of Chrome users coming.

The "nu" disease is spreading.

Right on all counts. I'm in that forum, but haven't been back since the Chrome disaster. I'm glad you reported that there is some signs of an uprising.

There have been Sinofsky style threading tricks there for a while. They have some real Dot OperaTards who troll around, sidetracking the countless important criticism threads, and then they get closed. It is unbelievable. Their purpose ( the trolls ) was to stop anything that seemed to disparage Opera, even though the threadstarters were trying like mad to wake them up. Threads with dozens of posters with positive ideas and complaints would be stopped dead in its tracks. A perfectly identical predecessor to the Destroying Windows Blog with Sinofsky. Just amazing.

And you're right. It is nothing but a Chrome clone with a skin vaguely resembling Opera. They smooshed the Address Bar and Search into one box. They removed toolbar customization ( from what I read ) and lots of other features. I just hope they fork the thing now, spinning off the Presto source code to someone else. Whoever infected their leadership should go commit Seppuku - ( "stomach-cutting", a form of Japanese ritual suicide by disembowelment ) :yes:

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3424
Formfiller

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There have been Sinofsky style threading tricks there for a while. They have some real Dot OperaTards who troll around, sidetracking the countless important criticism threads, and then they get closed. It is unbelievable. Their purpose ( the trolls ) was to stop anything that seemed to disparage Opera, even though the threadstarters were trying like mad to wake them up. Threads with dozens of posters with positive ideas and complaints would be stopped dead in its tracks. A perfectly identical predecessor to the Destroying Windows Blog with Sinofsky. Just amazing.


Amazing indeed. And even crazier than NuMicrosoft. Microsoft has at least a s***load of money and still a monopoly on the desktop; if metro totally fails, their financials can still keep them afloat for a while, giving time for develop some rescue strategies. Opera on the other hand has no such luxuries. Them p***ing users off is utterly suicidal.

I wonder where they teach such genius customer-management strategies.

#3425
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Just for the record, on the "enterprise" side I remember no particular "wows" at Windows 95 (let alone at FAT32).

Agreed, but why would they? Win95 was all about the standalone personal computer, local storage directly hooking up printers, using modems ( rather than networked comm and file and print servers ). Funny thing is, I'll bet if Microsoft could go back in time, they would have done it completely differently, playing down the user experience and emphasize the hive mentality and steer them into a proto-cloud, even at 56K dialup. :lol:


The .pif vs. .lnk argument is simply senseless.

I can't speak for that commenter at ZDNet but I'm not sure he meant PIF versus LNK. I suspect he was just trying to point out the brand new feature of LNK files connected to Windows applications like the older PIF files connected to DOS executables ( but I could be misreading him ). I think these were good ideas. Besides adding LNKs they also improved the PIFs by exposing many more settings to the properties GUI. The fact that they both survived this long means they really nailed it right out of the gate.


The "desktop paradigm" was already common in Windows 3.x (at least in my experience).

No doubt. The desktop was familiar ever since Windows 1.x really, and Win3x ProgMan was really just the latest tweak of it. Of course hardcore users got tired of waiting for Microsoft to stop playing around and likely tried out 3rd party shells on DOS like GEM or even ~shudder~ Apple Macs. All that waiting and searching for a useful shell suddenly ended for good when Win95 arrived. Well mostly, the Explorer shell has never been properly debugged and de-annoyanced.

In Win3x, as good as WinFile was ( and it was certainly better than its Explorer replacement ) the ProgMan shell just plain sucked. Clearly they had two different types of people designing the GUI, one went for tight, efficient use of space, forward looking with two panes ( WinFile ), the other wasted as much of the space as possible with big bright flat folders full of icons ( ProgMan ). I think I remember Sinofsky saying he was involved in Win3x as a rookie engineer, how much you wanna bet he had a hand in ProgMan but not WinFile, ( this would explain a lot of things really ). Anyway, people were certainly familiar with the desktop concept, folders and icons and everything else, but for the life of me I can't remember one that complained about Windows 95 ( contrary to MetroTard lies ).


FAT32 came later than 95, it was first in OSR 2 (which was an OEM only release, i.e. you couldn't have it without having it bundled with new hardware):
http://en.wikipedia....ows_95#Editions

That means (flatly) that FAT32 was NOT available in enterprise before August 1996 and ONLY on new machines.

You're right about August 1996 for the OSR 2 ( I recalled November, probably because of the 11:11 timestamp :lol: ). Anyway it is technically true about not for general release, but it was most definitely a normal full retail pressed CD with the same old OEM label ( "only for sale with a new PC" ) that many other versions carried, shrink-wrapped with a thin book and a license sticker. It came with new computers ( and possibly with new motherboards? ) but I'm not sure how these studios got them. I think I was mistaken about the FAT32 converter because I just dug through one of the discs and there is no trace of it outside or inside the CABs, I guess the converter only appeared in Win98 unless it was a file from the Softlib FTP. Regardless, we did full installs from new CD's sometime in late 1996.

The problem in the recording studios at that time was that they needed 2 GB and larger drives for working with wave files. At 650 MB per mastered audio CD plus tons more for processing it was top priority to get these "huge" disks ( which today would be considered a tiny flash drive :lol: ). This meant FAT32 or else. The thing I hated most though was the state of motherboard disk controllers, add-in EIDE cards and primitive system BIOS's. These were nightmares. I probably tried to suggest Windows NT plus SCSI hardware but that wasn't going to happen because even though money was no object ( to a point ), it was about budgeting for either a couple of SCSI systems or 10 normal systems. The latter meant that almost a dozen albums could be worked on simultaneously. Then there was the cost for CD Burners, several hundred bucks each in the early years, and they were merely 1x and 2x writers! The more I think about this period, the less I want to remember it! :yes:

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...





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