Jump to content

Welcome to MSFN Forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account



Photo

Windows 8 - Deeper Impressions


  • Please log in to reply
6135 replies to this topic

#3551
CharlotteTheHarlot

CharlotteTheHarlot

    MSFN Master

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,054 posts
  • Joined 24-September 07
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
On the security front the bad news still outweights the good ...

NSA and GCHQ siphoning huge quantities of data from undersea fiber optic cables ( TechSpot 2013-07-18 )

The plot thickens as the NSAs data collection net widens. NSA leaks reveal that governments are tapping into the Internets backbone to siphon off huge quantities of data. That is, government programs in the US and UK are able to gain access to tremendous amounts of data by accessing networks of undersea fiber optic cable, according to a report from The Atlantic.

British surveillance programs titled Mastering the Internet and Global Telecoms Exploitation (that sounds legitimate, right?), akin to the USs PRISM program, operate a subsidiary program called Tempora. Tempora soaks up huge amounts of data, upwards of 21 million gigabytes per day, and then retains the data for a month.

Tempora then shares this data with the NSA and British GCHQ, which reportedly commits 550 analysts to reviewing the contents. The data collected is cause for more concern to privacy advocates than the recent reports of collection of phone call metadata, because tapping into these cables allows governments to make complete copies of all the data, not just the metadata.

 
They pretty much decided to monitor everything, everywhere, all the time. I'm having a hard time thinking of something they might NOT be spying on now. Note that the USA is using the UK as yet another vendor, just like all the tech companies. This is an important point because they get to say that they themselves are not spying, so-called plausible deniability, letting others get their hands dirty and then forcing them to shut up about it.
 
  
Yahoo! Resisted PRISM, And Can Now Prove It ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-16 )

Okay, we'll give them a merit badge for trying at least. However, since Yahoo uses Bing as its actual search engine who do they think they are fooling? Also, if you read the article though you will see just how bad this whole thing is with that secret star-chamber FISA court rubber stamping the fed spooks and dismissing all challenges with the back of their hand.
  
 
Microsoft defends against data sharing allegations ( NeoWin 2013-07-16 )

Lots of weasel words in there, leaving a hole big enough to drive a fleet of government trucks through.
  
 
Microsoft and others asks for the US government's permission to reveal data requests ( NeoWin 2013-07-18 )

Microsoft, Others Requesting More NSA Transparency ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-18 )

Tech giants come together to demand NSA surveillance transparency ( TechSpot 2013-07-19 )
 

In a letter published yesterday, the more than 63 technology companies, trade groups and non-profit organizations called upon the U.S government to allow internet, telephone and other communications based service providers to disseminate requests they receive for user data in greater detail. More specifically the group is requesting permission to regularly share details regarding:

  • The number of government requests for information about their users
  • The number of individuals, accounts, or devices for which information was requested
  • The number of requests that sought communications content, basic subscriber information, and/or other information.
 
Actually, that request for transparency is more like translucency or opaqueness. That request language is merely asking for some minor rollbacks but nothing that would satisfy me or anyone else I know.

IMHO there is just one important thing to take away from all these stories, and it could be construed as good news ... these companies are actually getting some real heat now, specifically Microsoft who were exposed in the leaks as Big Brother's FIRST partner in crime ( perhaps we should call them Baby Brother ). So anyway, these guys are feeling pressure now, and I find this intriguing, very VERY intriguing. How exactly would Microsoft and the others receive angry feedback? How does anyone penetrate that force field? They are completely oblivious and tone-deaf to two years of criticism about the Windows 8 fiasco, so the pressure cannot logically be coming from the retail sector. Developer opinions carry no special weight, nor would they particularly care about end-user privacy, so I doubt it's them. Big business perhaps? Nah, I doubt any big American company gives a crap about privacy because if they are based here in the USA they are already subject to other forms of domestic spying, court orders, etc. So who else is there? I think there is only one thing left, and that is foreign interests ( business, government, utilities, retailers, end-users ), people who actually have something to lose by signing up with Microsoft. This is only speculation but I would guess that Office and Azure and even Windows contracts are suddenly in jeopardy. What form this might be taking I don't know, but there is no doubt that something has suddenly lit a fire under them.


U.S. Commerce Department unnecessarily destroyed $170K worth of IT gear to hunt down malware ( TechSpot 2013-07-09 )

Forgot about this one from a few weeks ago. This should drive fellow USA citizens mad. From both a financial wast point of view, and from a tech standpoint ...
 

In 2012, the department shelled out more than $2.7 million (more than half of their annual IT budget) trying to track down what appeared to be a major malware infestation. Acting on the guidance of the CIO of the Economic Development Administration (EDA), the department subsequently destroyed more than $170,000 worth of IT components including desktops, printers, TVs, cameras, computer mice and keyboards.

 
What! Malware infected printers, cameras, mice, keyboards! These must be MetroTards. Windows 8 was clearly made for them.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...



How to remove advertisement from MSFN

#3552
CharlotteTheHarlot

CharlotteTheHarlot

    MSFN Master

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,054 posts
  • Joined 24-September 07
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
More on the security and cloud related front ...

Kremlin returns to typewriters to avoid computer leaks ( UK Telegraph 2013-07-11 )

Back in Time: Russian Agency Seeks Typewriters for Secret Documents ( Spiegel International 2013-07-11 )

The Kremlin is Going Back to Typewriters, and You Should Too ( PolicyMic 2013-07-14 )

Russia considers going back to typewriters ( NeoWin 2013-07-14 )

Very cool story mentioned by Jaclaz earlier. Russian intelligence possibly reverting to typewritten paper archives for sensitive information. The "eyes only" approach is time tested and fairly secure but unfortunately it was easily defeated by tiny cameras and that weak link has also progressed a bit in the intervening years since cameras are smaller and more capable. But of course this story is probably just another smokescreen anyway. The real point is larger than typewriters, it is the fact that people are much more aware of what is going on. The spying scandal has effectively launched a new information arms race, not just between national capitols, but between everybody and those that allegedly govern them.

Look for the next big thing to be end-to-end security applications. It's amazing how PGP and Steganography and text cipher programs were all the rage in the 1990's and suddenly they disappeared from the public eye for at least the past decade. Secure P2P communication and end-user crypto will likely become quite the growth field of the next decade. And they will not be programs developed by Microsoft, Apple or Facebook.

Some examples are already surfacing ...

Pirate Bay co-founder plans Hemlis, an encrypted messaging app where 'no one can listen in' ( The Verge 2013-07-09 )

Pirate Bay co-founder planning "secure" WhatsApp rival ( NeoWin 2013-07-10 )

Pirate Bay co-founder to develop encrypted mobile messaging app ( TechSpot 2013-07-09 )

The real problem I guess is determining just who you can trust. At this particular point in time the Pirate guys no longer automatically sound like the enemy, do they? Of course this is "encypted messaging", which means they supply everything and is transparent to end-users. A lot of trust is placed into them which doesn't really solve the issue IMHO. An alternative is for both parties to have shared passkeys in advance and use offline standalone decrypters to unscramble coded messages they themselves create but send over such an encrypted service. This looks like a workable and secure arrangement given what we know. If anyone else has ideas or links about this I'd love to hear them.

Google testing encryption methods to foil government snooping ( TechSpot 2013-07-17 )

Google Testing File Encryption to Protect Drive Users ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-18 )

Somewhat related, Google is clearly moving to shore up the reputation of its cloud which is smart considering the situation with Microsoft and Office and Azure. If they play their cards right they might just peel away some of that user base which I do believe is very nervous at the moment. Google will have to do much more than this however, perhaps move their servers offshore because anything less cannot really guarantee security.

And therein lies the real consequence to the spying scandal, which John Dvorak correctly IMHO mentioned several times in posts cited earlier in this thread. The USA will be considered positively insecure for data storage of any kind, and quite rightly so.

Meanwhile, back in Redmond, the tone-deafness continues ...

Microsoft expands Office 365 to 38 new markets ( NeoWin 2013-07-13 )

I think one commenter had it right: "Office 365.. NSA 365 rather. I wonder which companies are so stupid to use this service anymore.."

Rumor: Shared file lists, folder mounting and more coming to SkyDrive ( NeoWin 2013-07-14 )

The article cites a laundry list of features for the cloudboys. Noticeably absent is anything about customer security from prying eyes inside their walls. We'll see how this pans out in their next earnings report. Watch for possible slowing cloud growth as an indicator.

Skype to retire Desktop API support by end of 2013 ( NeoWin 2013-07-15 )
 

Skype first launched its Desktop API nearly 10 years ago, well before Microsoft acquired the VoIP service in 2011. In his email, Andrews mentioned the previously announced plans to improve Skype's performance on mobile platforms as the main reason for retiring the Desktop API. He added:
 

These APIs were originally created in 2004 and do not support mobile application development. Going forward, developers will be able to write applications, which use features of Skype across all the major platforms, through the use of Skype URIs. We believe this will allow developers to create innovative mobile, web and desktop solutions, while retaining a familiar and consistent Skype experience across devices.

Andrews added that the decision "was not made lightly" and they wanted to give developers who still use the Desktop API in their applications time to modify them before their support ends.[/font][/size]

 
So the desktop API, pre-Microsoft acquisition, is retired and devs should rewrite their stuff now. Now there's a familiar story. Not to mention that there is a pretty good suspicion that "old code" now simply means not easily accessible by spooks. I suspect this is also very true with Windows in general and that is why there is such a mad push to kill their uber-successful Windows XP. I'd have to say that "old code" now means "safer code", but that's just me.

Regardless, Skype must now be the most radioactive of all Microsoft products. They have had substantial security and outage incidents, and are prominently mentioned in the spying scandal. See upthread for more. I wouldn't use it if my life depended on it.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3553
CharlotteTheHarlot

CharlotteTheHarlot

    MSFN Master

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,054 posts
  • Joined 24-September 07
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
News from the competition ...

Intel, Samsung Dishing Out Over $4 Million to Tizen Devs ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-09 )

To reel in developers for the new Tizen mobile platform, Intel and Samsung are providing $4.04 million in rewards to developers who contribute to the project via the Tizen App Challenge.

Previously it was rumored that the Tizen project was actually dead. The Tizen project itself resides within the Linux Foundation, and is governed by Intel and Samsung.

 
They go on to say that Tizen might be a threat to Android and Firefox operating systems, maybe so, maybe not, but it will in no way help Microsoft or Apple, that's for sure. Actually it will more likely serve as some needed Linux competition for Android, Firefox and Ubuntu, and that cannot be a bad thing. Especially if one of them or all of them figure out a way to circumvent and defeat whatever it is that Microsoft ( and Apple ) are extorting out of them as royalties. That should be topic number one at their little meetings. Now git'er done.
 

Deals July 12: Lenovo 7" Android 4.0 16GB Tablet $119 ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-12 )

This is from the periodic sale postings at Tom's, but I wanted to show that insane price of $119 for a Lenovo Android tablet. Now who can possibly compete with that? This is the critical "mobile" space that Ballmer and Co. decided to chase after and kill Windows for. But by the time they arrived, the manufacturers had driven prices down to levels that Microsoft cannot even fathom. Indeed, they are used to getting at least half of that just for the OS alone. It is also sweet because Lenovo is pretty much the one and only darling of the MicroVerse. Needless to say this tablet mention will not appear at NeoWin where it would only serve to rile up the natives.
 

Is an Ubuntu Phone in Verizon's Future? ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-13 )

Verizon joins the CAG ( Ubuntu Carrier Advisory Group ) leading some to think that these carriers are serious about some alternative phone operating systems. Naturally the MicroZealots will laugh at even the suggestion of this, fine. But one thing is for sure, it can not help WP, only hurt it. All it will take is a percentage point going to Firefox and another to Ubuntu and the Microsoft Tiles WP8 will be right back to the bottom from its current tenuous 3-4% marketshare. Laugh at your own risk fanboys.
 

Crytek in Need of a Programmer to Port CryEngine to Linux ( Maximum PC 2013-07-15 )

Hmmmm. This is how it could start. A couple of big names like Crysis and Far Cry running native on Linux would start the leaks popping in the platform dikes and Ballmer would run out of fingers to plug them up with. This may be totally unrelated to Steam too, the story does not say because it is merely a tidbit of information about a job position. But it has to be good news, unless you are a MicroZealot that is. The key really is to get a bunch of different game engines ported and up an running, once that happens many more releases should follow.
 

Rockchip Bringing Windowed, Tiled Capabilities to Android ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-19 )
 

Sure, Android is capable of multi-tasking, allowing users to run numerous apps in the background and access them by hitting the Recents button in the Navigation Bar. But typically users can't natively use their apps like they can in a desktop setting.

Chinese tablet maker Chuwi is reportedly making this happen thanks to chip maker Rockchip. The latter company was actually showcasing this multi-window technology back at CES 2013 using an RK3188 quad-core SoC. Users could treat Android like a desktop, opening apps in several windows, sizing them and moving them around on the screen.

 
XwzPwFp.jpg

There is some speculation there that Google might not like this and somehow clamp down on them ( good luck with that ), but you know that one or all of them will eventually get there anyway. It is inevitable since there are well over a billion people already familiar with the desktop concept, the same billion people that Microsoft took a giant crap on, therefore there are exactly a billion reasons to get this concept on Android. If Google does not want this clear shot across Microsoft's bow, then there are some backroom shenanigans that we really ought to know about. :yes:

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3554
CharlotteTheHarlot

CharlotteTheHarlot

    MSFN Master

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,054 posts
  • Joined 24-September 07
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
Xbox was also in the News ...

Who Needs PC When You Can Have Xbox One at Work ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-14 )

OK, so how is this gaming box going to boost productivity in the work environment? As Lyons pointed out, there's Skype which allows for multi-person chatting. Combine this factor with the wide-angle lens and 1080p view of the included Kinect sensor, and businesses have the means for collaborative meetings and presentations.

 
Considering the broad spying scandal, this sounds like the last thing anyone put on the factory floor or business office. But that's just me. :lol:


Microsoft Research uses Kinect to translate sign language ( NeoWin 2013-07-16 )

This is gonna sound like a nitpick to some people but I have to say, what the frig took so long? Frankly I expected this to be the absolute first thing that was done using Kinect. But I can see they were too busy with table tennis and other nonsense. And what Microsoft Research actually shows isn't really that incredible ...
 

The software has two modes. The first, Translation Mode, is self explanatory. It translate the sign language from a person into either text or speech. The second, Communications Mode, has a hearing person using the software who types in words that are then displayed on screen as sign language via a 3D avatar. The person on the other end then uses sign language that is then translated to text or speech.

 
... note the phrase "translated to text or speech". Why not both? It seems to me that this is the perfect application to shake out the bugs with, and that means pushing it to do it all, at once. I have a deaf relative and struggled to learn some signs and understand them, so I tend to watch for breakthroughs in this kind of AI. Frankly there is too little real progress. Even relatively simple related technologies like transcription and OCR and teleprompters are littered with errors. If these companies like IBM and Microsoft weren't too busy extorting patents, milking profits and holding back end-user technology, we would have had this licked a while ago. Realtime closed captioning and other things are so far behind expectations it is not even funny. I'm very disappointed.


Microsoft could bring some Xbox One digital sharing features back ( NeoWin 2013-07-13 )

Rumor: Microsoft Upgrading Xbox One Specs, Features ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-16 )

"The GPU core clock has been increased, and Microsoft will likely bring back Family Sharing." See what a little competition can do? :yes:


Microsoft win out, finally take ownership of xboxone.com ( NeoWin 2013-07-17 )

Grrrrr. The rigged system for Big Technology swallows up yet another victim. This guy had the name long before Microsoft ever even thought about Xbone. The fair thing would have been to buy it for a decent chunk of change or simply live with the fact that they blew it in the first place by not reserving it. Listen to the venom from the MicroZealots in there. "Hey they used the word 'Xbox' so they deserve to lose". Really? Should Microsoft have every domain with "Windows" or "Office" in the alias? Utterly ridiculous.


Windows RT was also in the news and definitely had a bad week ...

Surface RT at $350: Time to Buy? A sale is not a sale if you do not need the thing being sold ( Thurrott 2013-07-14 )

Paul Thurrott is definitely not going to make any new friends at Microsoft or NeoWin or The Verge with this column ...
 

With retailers suddenly dropping the price of Surface RT dramatically over the weekend, some are wondering if this is the time to take the plunge. Folks, put away your credit cards: Surface RT isnt a good deal at any price.

[...]

Some will try to tell you in the comments to this post that they love Windows RT and/or Surface RT and cannot for the life of them imagine why Paul, the big, bad, brutish Windows RT hater, keeps stating otherwise. My response is that 20 years of writing about technology and pretty extensive experience testing a wide range of Windows 8/RT hardware sets me up to understand this topic pretty well: Windows RT in general, and Surface RT specially, is not worth the investment. Its like throwing money away.

[...]

Im sorry this isnt better news. And Im not super-interested in hearing from RT defenders right now, sorry: Youre wrong about Surface RT. This may be an operating system for the future, sure. But its not the future. Its 2013, and this thing was built last year using components that were obsolete before it even hit the market. Do not fall for this Crazy Eddie pricing. You will only be disappointed.

 
That's gonna leave a mark!

I don't have time to skewer him and his upsey-downsey mood swings right now, but this downsey column contradicts key parts of his infamous The Desktop Must Die! article I covered here.


Lenovo stops selling Windows RT Yoga 11 notebook on its website ( NeoWin 2013-07-17 )

Whoopsie. Another one bites the dust.


Poll: Should Microsoft build a Surface RT 2? ( NeoWin 2013-07-19 )

Two-Thirds of the MetroTards, 68% say YES. Funny thing is, I doubt very many of even them have bought one. So why would they really want Microsoft to lumber ahead? Do they want to see another write-down?


Nvidia Sees Great Future with Windows RT ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-19 )

Pheewww. The nVidia dude is back, singing the praises of Windows 8 Retard Edition. It's sad really. And no-one is buying it. Check this out ...
 

Nvidia previously stated that its new Tegra 4 SoC will be used in multiple Windows RT tablets. Haas wouldn't elaborate on when, or what types of future RT products will appear. However Jack Gold, an analyst at J. Gold Associates, said he doesn't believe any tablet maker will produce a Windows RT tablet in the future. Even more, Nvidia is reportedly "blowing smoke" about the future of Windows RT and Surface RT because marketing people don't want to spook the market with negativity.

"RT is dying overnight. RT is going to die a slow death," he told Computerworld.

 
Wow! I don't recall seeing that quote mentioned at NeoWin.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3555
CharlotteTheHarlot

CharlotteTheHarlot

    MSFN Master

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,054 posts
  • Joined 24-September 07
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
Miscellaneous News ...

Verizon May Owe Apple $14B Over Slow iPhone Sales ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-14 )
 

The LA Times reports that Verizon Wireless may end up owing $14 billion to Apple. That's because the company must sell $23.5 billion worth of iPhone units this year to meet a commitment it made with Apple back in 2010. To do this, Verizon must double its iPhone sales of last year. Unfortunately, iPhone sales just aren't all that great thanks to larger, zippier Android phones dominating the market.

 
I think it's safe to say that the party is over for the smartphone boom, actually the big clue was to just watch for when Microsoft makes their big entry, because it is usually right before the bottom falls out, unfortunately Microsoft has Nokia to take the fall for them. Smartphones should be saturated within a few more quarters, at most a year and then the race to the bottom begins. Let's just hope that the rigged subsidy system is taken down with it. It is the only reason that tiny $700 phones ever had a chance to be "purchased" by people who cannot even help from losing their pocketbooks, laptops and even children. Anybody who buys in to the top-end now is nuts, this industry is about to become one big buyer's market.


WhatsApp for iOS moves to subscription model ( TechSpot 2013-07-17 )
 

The app initially sold for $0.99 in the App Store but as of today, itll be free of charge to download and use for the next year. After the one year trial period has expired, users will be charged $0.99 annually if they wish to keep using the popular messaging application.

 
And there's the business model in a nutshell, and exactly what to expect from Microsoft for Office and Windows. From .99 cents once to .99 cents a year in this case, but $99 dollars works just as well. Spreadsheet economics was the ancient term, now I call it sheeplenomics. Just picture the bean counters playing around with their spreadsheets. How do we squeeze more bottom line out of these numbers? Easy, just fiddle with the revenue column by locking the customers into a subscription instead, and deduct it right off their credit card. Do the numbers ever go down? No. Never. It is a purely synthetic model with no such thing as supply or demand. Moreover, if the cloud ever goes down are there any automatic adjustments crediting the accounts for lost service. Heck no.

Speaking of going down ...

Ubisoft accounts hacked, email addresses and passwords compromised ( PC Gamer 2013-07-03 )

Bohemia Interactive hacked usernames, emails and encrypted passwords taken ( PC Gamer 2013-07-12 )

Ah, just another day in the cloud. It's gonna be some sight to see the next time Xbox Live goes down.


Microsoft, Windows, and Phone News ...


Microsoft Demos 3D Printing with Windows 8.1 ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-13 )

Is this really supposed to be a selling point? Let's see, the government is banning certain items from being printed, forcing the CAD files to be removed from the websites, and we're supposed to believe that printing something from the new government approved Windows 8 is not going to phone home with the details? Come on.


Petition wants Microsoft to continue TechNet ( NeoWin 2013-07-13 )

Man, they really screwed the pooch with this one, huh? There are a few die-hard defenders naturally, but none of them are dumb enough to start a petition to 'Keep TechNet Dead!'.


Bill Gates jokes Microsoft Bob will make a comeback ( NeoWin 2013-07-15 )

Bill Gates: Microsoft Bob to Make a Return (in Concept) ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-16 )

Leave it to billg to mess up the punch line for this joke. He should have just said: Microsoft Bob is already here and working! Where do ya wanna go today?


Rumor: Windows Phone 9 will be a clean slate, again ( NeoWin 2013-07-15 )

Microsoft's Windows Phone design team deletes tweet on revamp rumor ( NeoWin 2013-07-20 )

More astonishing unprofessionalism. It sure seems that almost anyone can post stuff at Microsoft who have no concept of a public spokesman or information clearinghouse. In this case, the latest of many weird incidents, someone let slip that the next Windows Phone would be a total rewrite, then ...
 

The team also offered up a couple of responses to their first message from Twitter users, saying, "don't believe everything you read" and, when asked if they were drunk said, "nah. The guy who started that rumor is though."

However, just a couple of hours later, those messages were removed from the @WPdesignteam Twitter account. It's possible that the person in charge of that feed was not authorized to make official statements from Microsoft, and as a result the messages were taken down.

 
So they tried to correct it with that one tweet, but then pulled them all because they were not "official". This is like Three Stooges comedy. I love how the NeoWin author finished there with: "It's possible that the person in charge of that feed was not authorized to make official statements from Microsoft". Ya think!

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3556
CharlotteTheHarlot

CharlotteTheHarlot

    MSFN Master

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,054 posts
  • Joined 24-September 07
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
Microsoft, Windows, and Phone News ...

HP quietly launches Split x2, 13-inch Windows 8 convertible ( TechSpot 2013-07-17 )

Does HP even want to survive? :no: I said at launch that Windows 8 would drive up prices and we would get $1000 netbooks. Well that came true with the Surface, but this HP thing is even worse! 13" screen, i3 Ivy Bridge, 4 GB RAM and 128 GB disk, 1366 x 768 using onboard graphics. And this can be yours for only $749.

Flashback to a snapshot infographic I made nine months ago ...

Spoiler


Microsoft: The desktop UI will never go away completely ( NeoWin 2013-07-17 )
 

A TechCrunch article quotes Microsoft Chief Evangelist Steven Guggenheimer saying, at least at first, "Over time, its likely to go away." However, the article mentions that Guggenheimer quickly changed that statement, saying he was not sure if the desktop UI will "ever go away completely."

 
Yet another foible, a possible outburst of truth which was quickly retracted. So what of this? As said many times before, a standalone version of Metro aka Windows Tiles would have gone down in flames. Thus by necessity they decided to morph the existing Windows into it. A cynical deception. Add Metro to Windows and later remove the desktop and you have exactly what you wanted in the first place but were too cowardly to birth on its own. This disruptive action, a sneaky underhanded strategy to capture the Windows legacy user base, has cost them dearly. And this particular Softie for a brief moment spilled the beans.

In the comment thread we get treated to a repeat performance from the MetroTard-in-Chief, echoing one of his earlier pearls of wisdom concerning his childish love of screen touching ...
 

If you're afraid of smudges, then how do you get any work done with any other i/o device? No one today seems too concerned with smudges on their touch screens. Why is that suddenly an issue?

 
... where he is stating that since you don't care about smudges on your mouse or keyboard you shouldn't worry about them on your screen! It kinda proves he is blind, literally that is, as the display quality of the screen in front of him makes no difference to him whatsoever. He really does not see a problem with a smudge on a visual output device, one that you look at with your eyes. That would also explain why he cannot see the offensiveness of a blocky playskool theme sans shadows and 3D and depth and other normal visual clues. There really is no helping some people.


Nokia 'very happy' with Windows Phone, saw uncompetitive Android market ( Maximum PC 2013-07-18 )
 

Speaking to a group of European journalists, Elop said Nokia saw the potential for a single manufacturer to take most of the consumer market for Android smartphones.
 

What we were worried about a couple of years ago was the very high risk that one hardware manufacturer could come to dominate Android. We had a suspicion of who it might be, because of the resources available, the vertical integration, and we were respectful of the fact that we were quite late in making that decision. Many others were in that space already.

Now fast forward to today and examine the Android ecosystem, and there's a lot of good devices from many different companies, but one company has essentially now become the dominant player.

 
You know when these guys are lying? When their lips are moving. Android was maybe at 30% of the market when Nokia signed their contract with the devil and switched to Windows Phone. So what is he saying, they were afraid to compete? And what is with that swipe at Samsung like they are some kind of evil force? This guy Elop is a former Softie, yet he worries that "one manufacturer would dominate ...". He came to Nokia straight from a convicted monopolist that only is good at one thing, operating in a field without competition. His little speech there gives away the story. These Softies are full of envy and jealousy and hatred of competitors, particularly those rolling past Microsoft.


Microsoft's ads for Surface, Windows 8 and more boost overall tech ad spending ( Maximum PC 2013-07-18 )

An article describing the massive advertising budget that Big Little Brother Microsoft has dumped into the advertising world. What was it they set aside, 3 billion? 4 billion? Apparently it is providing a boost to the world economy, or something. Did anyone ever tell them that a good product advertises itself? Do they think that Apple really sold all those iThings because of their lame commercials? No. :no: They actually hardly ever air. It's just that they are memorable. Advertising can seriously turn off a buyer as well. I've seen enough of those silly Surface ads, especially that idi0tic one with the dancing on the table so many times that I would pay good money to see those hipsters tossed into a vat full of snakes and spiders on Fear Factor. That would be good advertising, and good TV. Microsoft got taken to the cleaners by their advertising agencies. And they never even saw it coming.


Microsoft's Surface Team Reportedly Turns Attention to Smart Watch Design ( Maximum PC 2013-07-18 )
 

According to The Independent, Microsoft employees are a testing a prototype smart watch made from aluminium oxynitride, an expensive material that's also known as transparent aluminum. It's said to be three times harder than glass and stable at temperatures up to 1,200 degrees Celsius.

Here's the thing -- aluminum oxynitride costs about $20,000 per square meter, which makes us a little bit suspect that Microsoft's going down that road. Whatever material Microsoft ends up using, assuming it's working on a smart watch to begin with, you can bet that it will run some form of Windows 8 and be able to communicate with other Windows 8 devices.

 
:lol: If that is transparent aluminum then my pool is full of liquid oxygen. Or hydrogen. Well you get the idea. Actually it is kind of a cool idea they have here because for once it is a uniquely original idea they are using rather than the normal ripping off of something else. The Wikipedia page does describe it as having good properties. Naturally they will find a way to ruin the one unique idea they had in a long time, probably by plastering the Playskool Microsoft Tiles garbage on it.

Check out my quick handiwork that compliments the mockup at the article link ...

Spoiler


EDIT: typo(s)

Edited by CharlotteTheHarlot, 21 July 2013 - 11:59 AM.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3557
G8YMW

G8YMW

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 114 posts
  • Joined 20-May 08
  • OS:XP Pro x86
  • Country: Country Flag

Charlotte,

I dont think I'll be buying one of those watches any day soon.

What with having to put my glasses on to do ANYTHING on that. I've visions of having to get past Angry Birds to get the time



#3558
Formfiller

Formfiller

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Joined 03-January 13
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

Here's NSA presentation for their software "XKeyscore". Apparently they use these slides to "sell" this system to allied intelligence agencies, like to the German ones.

 

http://www.spiegel.d...m-a-912173.html

Germany's foreign intelligence service, the BND, and its domestic intelligence agency, the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (BfV), used a spying program of the American National Security Agency (NSA). This is evident in secret documents from the US intelligence service that have been seen by SPIEGEL journalists. The documents show that the Office for the Protection of the Constitution was equipped with a program called XKeyScore intended to "expand their ability to support NSA as we jointly prosecute CT (counterterrorism) targets." The BND is tasked with instructing the domestic intelligence agency on how to use the program, the documents say.

 

According to an internal NSA presentation from 2008, the program is a productive espionage tool. Starting with the metadata -- or information about which data connections were made and when -- it is able, for instance, to retroactively reveal any terms the target person has typed into a search engine, the documents show. In addition, the system is able to receive a "full take" of all unfiltered data over a period of several days -- including, at least in part, the content of communications.

 

Furthermore, the documents show that the cooperation of the German intelligence agencies with the NSA has recently intensified. Reference is made to the "eagerness and desire" of BND head Gerhard Schindler. "The BND has been working to influence the German government to relax interpretation of the privacy laws to provide greater opportunities of intelligence sharing," the NSA noted in January. Over the course of 2012, German partners had shown a "willingness to take risks and to pursue new opportunities for cooperation with the US."

 

In Afghanistan, it says elsewhere in the document, the BND had even proved to be the NSA's "most prolific partner" when it came to information gathering. The relationship is also close on a personal level: At the end of April, just a few weeks before the first revelations by former intelligence agency employee Edward Snowden, a 12-member high-level BND delegation was invited to the NSA to meet with various specialists on the subject of "data acquisition."

 

Anyway, here it is:

 

NSA-Spaehsoftware-XKeyscore-1374388757-0

 

 

NSA-Spaehsoftware-XKeyscore-1374388744-0

NSA-Spaehsoftware-XKeyscore-1374388750-0

LOL! I know the NSA doesn't employ Photoshop wizards, but this is quite pathetic on a artistic level. The slides look like straight from a cheap "HTML generator" website, where some hobbyist is trying to sell off his newest shareware masterpiece.

 

I especially like the cheesy early 90s "XKeyscore" logo.

 

"My target uses Google Maps to scope target locations - can I use this information to determine his email address"?

 

This sounds almost like a SEO-pitch ("how can I book the best ads on Google so that my potential customers will find my website faster?")

 

I had to laugh about "plug-ins" and the guy doing a query in slide 2. It's as if they are selling a MySQL tool.

 

It's serious topic, but it's incredible how cheesy it looks and sounds "internally".


Edited by Formfiller, 21 July 2013 - 12:40 PM.


#3559
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,569 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

I would say that it is not-as-secret-as our Germans (or Brazilians) friends seem to think (or try to "sell" to the world).

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/X-Keyscore

 

More than one company is recruiting "in the open":

http://www.indeed.co...?q=Xkeyscore&l=

specifically for x-keyscore.

I doubt that if it was a top-secret military/NSA ONLY *whatever*  you could find job requests about it. :unsure:

 

Besides not-that-much-covert linkedin profiles such as (example):

http://www.techdirt....-linkedin.shtml

https://twitter.com/...139237856460801

http://www.linkedin....ller/39/741/a49

 

I have the impression that people in the US Army and in the NSA spend more time inventing and remembering codenames (and making crappy PowerPoint slides for them) than anything else, just for the record:

http://www.bullypulp...ames/new_names/

http://www.bullypulp..._code_names.txt

 

jaclaz


Edited by jaclaz, 21 July 2013 - 11:59 AM.


#3560
Formfiller

Formfiller

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Joined 03-January 13
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

 

More than one company is recruiting "in the open":

http://www.indeed.co...?q=Xkeyscore&l=

specifically for x-keyscore.

I doubt that if it was a top-secret military/NSA ONLY *whatever*  you could find job requests about it. :unsure:

 

jaclaz

 

Funny how open that is indeed.

 

http://jobs.saic.com...m_source=Indeed

 

JOB SUMMARY:
The Systems Engineer will provide support for the compartment systems that encompass the SKIDROWE systems. The successful candidate will be a self-starter, work well in a dynamic team environment, and be very organized and detailed oriented.

 

..

 

 

•This candidate will need to have experience in basic SIGINT technology as well as integrating, installing, configuring, changing, and optimizing HW & SW solutions into an overall system architecture.
•Support SIGINT systems by performing custom configurations of fielded mission systems.

 

 

Qualifications:
BASIC QUALIFICATIONS:
•High School diploma or equivalent with 3- 4+ years of related experience installing, configuring, integrating, and testing software which run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).
•Software Integration experience with scripting languages (Java, C and Bourne shell).
•Familiar with VMware ESXi 3.5, 4.1, and 5.0.
•Currently possess an active TS/SCI with Polygraph security clearance.

 

--

 

Apart from the last one, the basic qualifications are ridiculously mundane. Red Hat? I thought stuff like that runs on something cooler.

 

By the way, corporations require nowadays usually far more qualifications for positions like beta testing software. And here you can play spy with a bit of Linux and script experience. Odd.

 

This is funny:

 

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

 

•Excellent interpersonal, verbal, and written communication skills with the ability to successfully interact with internal and external customers.

 

I love it. *Customers*.


Edited by Formfiller, 21 July 2013 - 11:55 AM.


#3561
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,569 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

Yeah, the "news" (if any) are just the (crappy) slides.

Look a bit around for the book:

The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America

by: http://en.wikipedia....i/James_Bamford

It is published in 2008 and contains some reference to xkeyscore ad similar alright.

 

Let's say that at least this time the whistleblowers failed to blow hard enough or however the whistle came out a little faint, before the mass of mindless journalists and blogging jerks ping-ponged these non-news back and forth saturating the net with the topic.

 

I see it not entirely unlike someone publishing in - say - 1919 the original, handwritten manual and drawings for a COLT M19A11 and titling the article "New, deadly weapon revealed!"

 

jaclaz



#3562
CharlotteTheHarlot

CharlotteTheHarlot

    MSFN Master

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,054 posts
  • Joined 24-September 07
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

lol microsoft was 1st jackass to comply
does this means Vista is clean of backdoors ? :D

Prism_slide_5.jpg


Missed this post earlier. Cool graphic.

I don't think we can state with certainty that Vista is clean. On that graphic, September 2007 was the date that Microsoft officially got married to the spook agencies. But I would speculate that the long run-up to Vista, the infamous Longhorn re-write was at least partly about spying. We're talking like 4 years after 9/11 and more importantly a decade after the Carnivore and Echelon and other earlier forays into collaborative spying.

Thinking back about this I have always been mystified as to Microsoft's sudden change during the Vista fiasco in 2006-2007 and their seeming anger at the pushback and criticism by end-users. It never made any sense to me. Nothing like that happened with their earlier failures. Yet they were apoplectic and turned on us. We were "doing it wrong". Here, have a Mojave Experiment.

It seems possible to me that the Longhorn rewrite was partly about building doors for data collection, not necessarily giving the feds a free pass, but they would be in place if they needed it for court orders ( again, 9/11 already came and went ). Things have changed radically since, but it is very plausible to me that they were sweet talked and massaged into an agreement having no idea what it would evolve to later. In other words it was harmless in their eyes.

This I would buy as a reason for their inexplicable panic over Vista. They're thinking, "Shoot, if we can't get this thing into the user base then we can't easily comply with any warrants". It also jives with the inexplicable push to kill Windows XP. Even though SP3 came in April 2008, I don't think it was time enough to develop it into a magic spook plugin pack. So there Windows XP it sits, on 35% of the 1.5 billion computers, relatively secure.

All things considered, a real good "conspiracy theory" could be constructed. For example it is possible that the DRM fiasco that Gutmann exposed might have gotten a little too close for comfort as he poked and prodded to see what the OS was snooping for. And then there was the assimilation of Winternals and Mark Russinovich in summer of 2006. He's the guy that did similar heroic snooping of Sony and ferreted out their sneaky DRM. Taking him out of play, so to speak, prevents a very sharp set of eyeballs from snooping in the new Vista OS ( and it was suspicious how his Rootkit Revealer suddenly was killed, a utility that might detect something that is smart enough to hide itself using countermeasures ).

NOTE: needless to say, this is all just speculation. I got nothing to show for proof obviously, they are hopefully just coincidences. But after watching them and most of the industry for going on four decades now, you sometimes trust your gut, especially when no-one is talking or likely ever to talk about such matters. I could be completely wrong though, and Vista may be no more dangerous than WinXP or Win9x. I just highly doubt it.

I have also wondered just how information could be taken from an operating system anyway. It wouldn't be easy if the user had packet sniffing experience, a hardware firewall and a variety of rootkit detectors. But then I remembered that CEIP thingie. It sets up bundles of collected collated data burst transmitted later. Something like that could be reconfigured, especially if you have the Windows source code which I'd bet the spooks do. These are just wild speculations, just tossing them out there. I'll let others dwell on them and carry it further.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3563
JorgeA

JorgeA

    FORMAT B: /V /S

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 3,217 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10
  • OS:Vista Home Premium x64
  • Country: Country Flag

 

Windows turning into a "boutique" OS -- ouch!


this is nothing new. We know this sicne we saw Windows Developer preview the first time :thumbdown

 

 

:lol:

 

--JorgeA



#3564
JorgeA

JorgeA

    FORMAT B: /V /S

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 3,217 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10
  • OS:Vista Home Premium x64
  • Country: Country Flag

 

More importantly -- in your view, what would have been a more pragmatic approach on the ReactOS team's part?

 

Hmmm :unsure:, this would probably need a new dedicated thread, where I will manage to get flamed  :ph34r: by everyone:

  • the "Windows" guys
  • the "Linux" guys
  • the "React-OS" guys

BTW all good guys :thumbup:, but quite touchy when you "comment" their beloved creature/preferred OS.

 

See if these posts are enough:

http://www.msfn.org/...e-6#entry747389

http://reboot.pro/to...indows/?p=46592

http://reboot.pro/to...ain/#entry43184

 

jaclaz

 

 

Yes, those posts did the trick, thanks!

 

--JorgeA


Edited by JorgeA, 21 July 2013 - 02:24 PM.


#3565
JorgeA

JorgeA

    FORMAT B: /V /S

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 3,217 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10
  • OS:Vista Home Premium x64
  • Country: Country Flag

Look for the next big thing to be end-to-end security applications. It's amazing how PGP and Steganography and text cipher programs were all the rage in the 1990's and suddenly they disappeared from the public eye for at least the past decade. Secure P2P communication and end-user crypto will likely become quite the growth field of the next decade. And they will not be programs developed by Microsoft, Apple or Facebook.

 

Historically, the problem with encrypted e-mail has been the hassle factor and the difficulty of setting it up to work with others with whom you communicate. Until and unless someone, somehow, figures out a way to do e-mail encryption so that it works automatically (if that's what you want) and with everyone that you send to or receive from (while preventing them from reading e-mails to and from third parties, should they manage to get their hands on your inbox), I doubt that e-mail encryption will become as routine a function as launching Outlook.

 

My ISP is starting to implement SSL for its e-mail service, but with the NSA looking over their shoulder I'm skeptical that it will be of any use against official snoopers; and in any case it seems to me that any e-mail directed at me would still have to arrive at my ISP's servers already encrypted at the sender's end for the encryption to be of much help.

 

I'm willing to be enlightened on this subject and to be shown that these things are already doable.

 

--JorgeA



#3566
JorgeA

JorgeA

    FORMAT B: /V /S

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 3,217 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10
  • OS:Vista Home Premium x64
  • Country: Country Flag

Miscellaneous News ...

Verizon May Owe Apple $14B Over Slow iPhone Sales ( Tom's Hardware 2013-07-14 )
 


The LA Times reports that Verizon Wireless may end up owing $14 billion to Apple. That's because the company must sell $23.5 billion worth of iPhone units this year to meet a commitment it made with Apple back in 2010. To do this, Verizon must double its iPhone sales of last year. Unfortunately, iPhone sales just aren't all that great thanks to larger, zippier Android phones dominating the market.

 
I think it's safe to say that the party is over for the smartphone boom, actually the big clue was to just watch for when Microsoft makes their big entry, because it is usually right before the bottom falls out, unfortunately Microsoft has Nokia to take the fall for them. Smartphones should be saturated within a few more quarters, at most a year and then the race to the bottom begins. Let's just hope that the rigged subsidy system is taken down with it. It is the only reason that tiny $700 phones ever had a chance to be "purchased" by people who cannot even help from losing their pocketbooks, laptops and even children. Anybody who buys in to the top-end now is nuts, this industry is about to become one big buyer's market.

 

Considering that the smartphone boom was one of the main factors in Microsoft's decision to destroy Windows, the end of that mobile craze wouldn't be coming a moment too soon.

 

--JorgeA



#3567
JorgeA

JorgeA

    FORMAT B: /V /S

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 3,217 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10
  • OS:Vista Home Premium x64
  • Country: Country Flag

Anyway, here it is:

 

NSA-Spaehsoftware-XKeyscore-1374388757-0

 

 

NSA-Spaehsoftware-XKeyscore-1374388744-0

NSA-Spaehsoftware-XKeyscore-1374388750-0

 

Where'd you find the slides? I clicked on the Spiegel link and saw the text you quoted, but no illustrations other than a photo of the 23-letter sign at the BND headquarters.

 

--JorgeA



#3568
JorgeA

JorgeA

    FORMAT B: /V /S

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 3,217 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10
  • OS:Vista Home Premium x64
  • Country: Country Flag

My ISP is starting to implement SSL for its e-mail service, but with the NSA looking over their shoulder I'm skeptical that it will be of any use against official snoopers; and in any case it seems to me that any e-mail directed at me would still have to arrive at my ISP's servers already encrypted at the sender's end for the encryption to be of much help.

 

In light of that, and of everything else we've been saying about online and e-mail privacy, I'm wondering if anybody here can comment (helpfully :whistle: ) on this and this.

 

Thanks.

 

--JorgeA



#3569
Formfiller

Formfiller

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Joined 03-January 13
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

 

Anyway, here it is:

 

NSA-Spaehsoftware-XKeyscore-1374388757-0

 

 

NSA-Spaehsoftware-XKeyscore-1374388744-0

NSA-Spaehsoftware-XKeyscore-1374388750-0

 

Where'd you find the slides? I clicked on the Spiegel link and saw the text you quoted, but no illustrations other than a photo of the 23-letter sign at the BND headquarters.

 

--JorgeA

 

 

There are on a bunch of news sites.

 

Image search bring them up:

 

http://www.google.co...img.1faK7e7pBZg



#3570
CharlotteTheHarlot

CharlotteTheHarlot

    MSFN Master

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,054 posts
  • Joined 24-September 07
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

My ISP is starting to implement SSL for its e-mail service, but with the NSA looking over their shoulder I'm skeptical that it will be of any use against official snoopers; and in any case it seems to me that any e-mail directed at me would still have to arrive at my ISP's servers already encrypted at the sender's end for the encryption to be of much help.

 
In light of that, and of everything else we've been saying about online and e-mail privacy, I'm wondering if anybody here can comment (helpfully :whistle: ) on this and this.
 
Thanks.
 
--JorgeA


Funny thing is, Steganos ( or Demcom ) is one of the companies I was thinking about. They were around since at least the late 1990's and had some interesting software. One thing they did was the steganography process of coding messages inside things like image files. Another very unusual thing was developing zero emission utilities that used a display method that thwarted the possibility of someone mirroring your CRT monitor contents remotely by reading the EMR emissions. Pretty cool and cutting edge in the consumer space.

I looked at the links and can offer no opinion really, I simply haven't kept up with them. But it does resemble the trend of Mega Security Suites with every possible bell and whistle. These things must be huge punishment for the CPU, file activity and memory transactions, and Internet communication. How could they not be. If the darn CPUs were at 8 GHz instead of 4 then I might be able to write off the performance cost of countless realtime security processes. Anytime I see a picture of a screen full of security programs I get a gut wrenching feeling of an underpowered PC slogging along in slow motion.

In the home, if people designed a network where there was a single computer doing Internet it might make sense to sacrifice it as the front facing beast loaded down with security software. Everything else being kept offline can run naked and at full possible speed, not saddled down with all the security stuff. Unfortunately most people don't even come close to this arrangement. It is now normal for everything to be connected to the outside, from the PCs to the laptops, phones, etc. Countless points of failure. Software like this needs to be present on everything. ~sigh~

I think the real action in security is going to be found in routers. Using a gateway choke point is economical and and simpler. A router makes a terrific gateway because it has all the features we need, from a hardware firewall to an internal network hub. But we do need further advances here. I would like to see much better firmware for starters. I would also like to see serious testing from multiple independent security researchers to assure us they ( the routers ) have not been compromised by the federales.

Recall how all the printer manufacturers also got in bed with government or law enforcement, creating some kind of detectable watermark embedded on all printouts because of special firmware code. Hollywood managed to insert themselves into every piece of A/V consumer electronics also. So it sure would not surprise me at all if the spooks already got to the router manufacturers.

I'm hoping we start seeing new super routers specifically tailored for this new age we're suddenly in. They should go out of their way to advertise their independence: "Hacker-proof and Government Spy-proof!. In fact I would like to start seeing this trend everywhere. For pushback to become effective it needs to develop some momentum. Statements like those would start the ball rolling and create peer pressure on the others.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3571
CharlotteTheHarlot

CharlotteTheHarlot

    MSFN Master

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,054 posts
  • Joined 24-September 07
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
Rumor: ValueAct wants a seat on Microsoft's board ( NeoWin 2013-07-21 )

If true, this would seem to signal a more hands-on approach from ValueAct in regards to influencing Microsoft's future plans. The report comes on the heels of Microsoft's latest financial results, where it took a one time $900 million charge because of a price cut on its Surface RT tablet. The news caused Microsoft's stock price to plummet 11.40 percent in trading on Friday. Reuters claims that ValueAct may be opposed to Microsoft launching its own computers.

 
These are the group of stockholders that are trying to get Ballmer booted.

This has to be worrisome to the fanboys. And they are showing it in the comments with cursing and screeching.
 

I'm very much against this. Letting people who don't know much about the market and have no passion for IT make decisions for MS. I wonder what they think about MS Research for example.

 
Well that description: "don't know much about the market" and "no passion for IT" also describes Ballmer, doesn't it? :yes:

Karma has a way of popping up when you least expect it. These interlopers are trying to get onto the Microsoft Board of Directors which kind of reminds me of Elop getting into Nokia. The only unfortunate thing is that they won't be able to kill Microsoft's pOS operating system the same way that Elop killed Nokia's.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#3572
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,569 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

Recall how all the printer manufacturers also got in bed with government or law enforcement, creating some kind of detectable watermark embedded on all printouts because of special firmware code. Hollywood managed to insert themselves into every piece of A/V consumer electronics also. So it sure would not surprise me at all if the spooks already got to the router manufacturers.

To be picky the "all" might mean "some" and in any case limited to colour laser printers.

http://en.wikipedia....r_steganography

http://www.bunniestu....com/blog/?p=48

https://www.eff.org/...y-tracking-dots

 

For NO apparent reason, a couple not-so-random links:

http://www.zeroshell.org/

http://www.plugcompu...uruplug-server/

 

And (this time slightly OT, but not much ;)):

http://www.thebigfix.com.au/

http://www.thebigfix.com.au/?p=50

 

And - curiously enough - sometimes we enter a loop:

http://www.thebigfix.com.au/?p=467

http://makezine.com/...open-source-it/

 guess what you do when your good idea fails miserably? :ph34r:

 

You insist on it some ten years later or so! :w00t::

http://www.smartwatc...tch-smartwatch/

 

 

jaclaz


Edited by jaclaz, 22 July 2013 - 07:08 AM.


#3573
sparkles

sparkles

    Newbie

  • Member
  • 14 posts
  • Joined 17-April 13
  • OS:Windows 8 x64
  • Country: Country Flag

Here's NSA presentation for their software "XKeyscore". Apparently they use these slides to "sell" this system to allied intelligence agencies, like to the German ones.

 

NSA-Spaehsoftware-XKeyscore-1374388744-0

 

LOL! I know the NSA doesn't employ Photoshop wizards, but this is quite pathetic on a artistic level. The slides look like straight from a cheap "HTML generator" website, where some hobbyist is trying to sell off his newest shareware masterpiece...

 

As an involuntarily-retired graphic designer (after two years w/o a job and only 2 interviews, I've given up and am now applying for clerk typist jobs), it makes me very sad.

 

That second interview in fact was just last week. The woman clearly didn't like me, and as she perused my printed portfolio she stopped at a website design from my previous job and said "was that done some time ago? Because it looks old." By "old" I guess she meant lacking in the flat Playskool look prevalent today...I just wanted to walk out and drive my car off the nearest highway ramp...:-(


Edited by sparkles, 22 July 2013 - 08:33 AM.


#3574
JorgeA

JorgeA

    FORMAT B: /V /S

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 3,217 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10
  • OS:Vista Home Premium x64
  • Country: Country Flag

Funny thing is, Steganos ( or Demcom ) is one of the companies I was thinking about. They were around since at least the late 1990's and had some interesting software. One thing they did was the steganography process of coding messages inside things like image files. Another very unusual thing was developing zero emission utilities that used a display method that thwarted the possibility of someone mirroring your CRT monitor contents remotely by reading the EMR emissions. Pretty cool and cutting edge in the consumer space.

 

How about that (that you were thinking about this very company). The main thing I was hoping for was some indication that Steganos was a real and reputable company -- and you did provide that. :yes:  Thanks!

 

In the home, if people designed a network where there was a single computer doing Internet it might make sense to sacrifice it as the front facing beast loaded down with security software. Everything else being kept offline can run naked and at full possible speed, not saddled down with all the security stuff. Unfortunately most people don't even come close to this arrangement. It is now normal for everything to be connected to the outside, from the PCs to the laptops, phones, etc. Countless points of failure. Software like this needs to be present on everything. ~sigh~

 

That's an interesting idea, dedicating one PC in a network to security. I know about using a computer to run a firewall for other computers, but how would that work for all the other security stuff?

 

--JorgeA



#3575
JorgeA

JorgeA

    FORMAT B: /V /S

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 3,217 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10
  • OS:Vista Home Premium x64
  • Country: Country Flag

 

As an involuntarily-retired graphic designer (after two years w/o a job and only 2 interviews, I've given up and am now applying for clerk typist jobs), it makes me very sad.

 

That second interview in fact was just last week. The woman clearly didn't like me, and as she perused my printed portfolio she stopped at a website design from my previous job and said "was that done some time ago? Because it looks old." By "old" I guess she meant lacking in the flat Playskool look prevalent today...I just wanted to walk out and drive my car off the nearest highway ramp...:-(

 

 

That's a real bummer, sorry you're in that situation.

 

As for your web design looking "old," what the heck is that supposed to mean? It either looks beautiful and/or is easy to use, or it doesn't. What does "old" or "new" have to do with anything?? If I were the "Lost in Space" robot, right now I'd be spitting out, irrelevant -- irrelevant -- irrelevant...

 

--JorgeA


Edited by JorgeA, 22 July 2013 - 10:40 AM.





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users