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Windows 8 - Deeper Impressions


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#4826
JorgeA

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@TELVM and @duffy98,

 

Thanks for the info on user agents. It looks like the technique applies to Firefox/Pale Moon but not to IE8; typing "about:config" in a new tab gives me a "Navigation Canceled" result.

 

I found some pages on the Web that give instructions on how to change the user agent in IE by going into "Developer Tools" (F12), but they work only in IE9 and not 8 which doesn't have a "change user agent" choice in that Tools submenu.

 

Am I out of luck? :unsure:

 

--JorgeA

 

:crazy: Are you really using IE Jorge?

 

 

Yup.  :)

 

Probably the main reason is that, after I got back into tech (almost exactly five years ago now), the thick Windows manuals that I'd bought offered tons of tips for tweaking Internet Explorer -- whereas I don't know where to look for these settings (or even if the same ones are available) in other browsers. There IS something to be said for a "one-stop shopping" manual as opposed to having to hunt all over the Web for things that you may not even know to ask about.

 

I'm also familiar and comfortable with IE's UI: I know where everything is, and although I've tried Firefox and Chrome (plus a couple of minor browsers), I haven't felt any compelling reason to switch. Plus, it's annoying that FF (and Chrome, if I ever used it again) keep pushing new versions on me -- some of which, moreover, remove functionality. To these browsers' developers, I would say, Leave it alone already; stop trying constantly to justify your existence, and get a life.

 

--JorgeA

 

EDIT: typo


Edited by JorgeA, 27 December 2013 - 09:41 AM.



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#4827
JorgeA

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Hey TELVM ... that's good! I like those commercials. I also wonder if JorgeA uses IE 8 that much ... there are so many other browsers available.

 

IE8 is the main browser on my Vista work machine. I like all the little informational notifications that pop up on the status bar, which were removed from IE9 and only a couple of which could be brought back by Classic Shell.

 

--JorgeA



#4828
JorgeA

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[re: Bing's red-ink operations]

Oh but wait. One of the MicroZealots offers us some wisdom
 

You don't have to make up past spending. The value of a business is how it's moving money right now. As long as they didn't create debt with the spending, it becomes unimportant after the fact.


Yeah, that's what we call the private sector genius. You have every right to go broke on your own business ( well, unless you count us taxpayers having to bail you out of bankruptcy but that's beside the point ). Perhaps his dictionary stops before the word "Fiduciary" and its related concepts. Like it or not ( and I really don't ) Microsoft answers to her stockholders and regulators first. Books have to be accurate and hiding things is, well, frowned upon. If stockholders ever got organized ( I mean moreso than the little power play that likely helped to oust Ballmer ) they could cause a huge fuss and those bleeding products like Bing and Xbox would be fast out the door.


Bill Gates helps to fund project for powering cellphones with urine ( NeoWin 2013-12-20 )

Well, I'll just leave this here as one of those headlines that you thought you would never see. :blink:  Check that, actually I have to give props to a NeoKid for coining the phrase of the day ... pPhone ... :lol:

 

 

I could say something about p*ssing money away, but I won't... :whistle:

 

--JorgeA

 



#4829
JorgeA

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The "I got a Windows 8.1 machine for Christmas, now what do I do?" guide ( NeoWin 2013-12-16 )

The NeoWin approved guidebook for Metron00bs lost in those magnificent fields of Windows bliss but unable to find their own way into the nice cozy sheeple pens. A few funny comments as you can imagine, and of course some sheep bleating ( "Ugh, these poor people suggesting some awful old-fashioned start menu replacement or even worse, install windows 7... It's like the people who were wedded to the Windows 3.1 Program Manager and DOS when Windows 95 came out." ... Liar. ). Rather than going through all this trouble I would have just given a link ...

 

 

LOVED those shutdown/disconnection/error sound effects they added in there!! :thumbup

 

--JorgeA



#4830
JorgeA

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Either way, RSA has some explainin' to do, considering the extraordinary position of trust and reputation these three, Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman enjoy. Most importantly is the one ( of perhaps many ) known backdoors that made its way into Vista among other products ...
 

Dual_EC_DRBG had been regarded with suspicion by cryptography experts ever since a 2007 paper, written by two Microsoft researchers, showed that it contained hidden mathematical relationships that made presumably random numbers not random at all.

The flaw could be exploited by the holder of a certain number, unknown to the researchers, and amounted to a "backdoor," a secret way to decrypt any information that had been encrypted using Dual_EC_DRBG.

Following the Snowden revelation,RSA Security advised its customers who used BSAFE to switch to another PRNG.


These guys would do well to start talking straight about all these issues, although I can't imagine anyone taking their word for it at face value. We've seen the pressure put on other less prominent names, such as the Lavabit company owner who has the stones to fight back. Whether the RSA principals have similar inclinations remains to be seen. Read the Wikipedia page for a synopsis of the issues and links outside to other stories. This is quite important IMHO, and could ultimately lead to vital information we need such as what other backdoors are in place in Windows and other products.

[emphasis added]

 

About the owner of Lavabit, here's an interview Ladar Levison gave to TWIT's Leo Laporte. The sound quality isn't the best, but Levison talks about the tricks the cops used to make things as difficult and costly for him as possible (and some counter-measures that he took along the same lines :)). My favorite quote from him: "I'm not anti-government, I'm pro-freedom."

 

He sounds like a guy who's willing to stand up for his principles and take the heat for it.

 

--JorgeA



#4831
JorgeA

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In privacy news:

 

Report: NSA intercepts computer deliveries

 

LONDON (AP) -- A German magazine lifted the lid on the operations of the National Security Agency's hacking unit Sunday, reporting that American spies intercept computer deliveries, exploit hardware vulnerabilities, and even hijack Microsoft's internal reporting system to spy on their targets.

.

One of the most striking reported revelations concerned the NSA's alleged ability to spy on Microsoft Corp.'s crash reports, familiar to many users of the Windows operating system as the dialogue box which pops up when a game freezes or a Word document dies. The reporting system is intended to help Microsoft engineers improve their products and fix bugs, but Der Spiegel said the NSA was also sifting through the reports to help spies break into machines running Windows. One NSA document cited by the magazine appeared to poke fun at Microsoft's expense, replacing the software giant's standard error report message with the words: "This information may be intercepted by a foreign sigint (signals intelligence) system to gather detailed information and better exploit your machine."

 

The arrogance of these people is monumental.

 

Here's the link to the original article by Der Spiegel, which offers a more extensive and somewhat more detailed discussion. Read it and start shakinhg your head. :no:

 

image-583918-galleryV9-onik.jpg

image-583917-galleryV9-akfw.jpg

(Sorry for the enormous amount of space used up there.)

 

A comprehensive internal presentation titled "QUANTUM CAPABILITIES," which SPIEGEL has viewed, lists virtually every popular Internet service provider as a target, including Facebook, Yahoo, Twitter and YouTube. "NSA QUANTUM has the greatest success against Yahoo, Facebook and static IP addresses," it states. The presentation also notes that the NSA has been unable to employ this method to target users of Google services. Apparently, that can only be done by Britain's GCHQ intelligence service, which has acquired QUANTUM tools from the NSA.

.

Once TAO teams have gathered sufficient data on their targets' habits, they can shift into attack mode, programming the QUANTUM systems to perform this work in a largely automated way. If a data packet featuring the email address or cookie of a target passes through a cable or router monitored by the NSA, the system sounds the alarm. It determines what website the target person is trying to access and then activates one of the intelligence service's covert servers, known by the codename FOXACID.

 

This NSA server coerces the user into connecting to NSA covert systems rather than the intended sites. In the case of Belgacom engineers, instead of reaching the LinkedIn page they were actually trying to visit, they were also directed to FOXACID servers housed on NSA networks. Undetected by the user, the manipulated page transferred malware already custom tailored to match security holes on the target person's computer.

.

And the techniques go beyond digital theft to physical theft:

 

Sometimes it appears that the world's most modern spies are just as reliant on conventional methods of reconnaissance as their predecessors.

 

Take, for example, when they intercept shipping deliveries. If a target person, agency or company orders a new computer or related accessories, for example, TAO can divert the shipping delivery to its own secret workshops. The NSA calls this method interdiction. At these so-called "load stations," agents carefully open the package in order to load malware onto the electronics, or even install hardware components that can provide backdoor access for the intelligence agencies. All subsequent steps can then be conducted from the comfort of a remote computer.

 

These minor disruptions in the parcel shipping business rank among the "most productive operations" conducted by the NSA hackers, one top secret document relates in enthusiastic terms. This method, the presentation continues, allows TAO to obtain access to networks "around the world."

 

Things aren't as bad as they seem -- they're worse. :realmad:

 

--JorgeA

 



#4832
monroe

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Yes JorgeA ... you are so right ... It just gets worse !

 

I was reading all this earlier but I figured you or Charlotte would bring everyone up to speed on the latest news.

 

This part is crazy ... "The NSA calls this method interdiction. At these so-called "load stations," agents carefully open the package in order to load malware onto the electronics, or even install hardware components that can provide backdoor access for the intelligence agencies. All subsequent steps can then be conducted from the comfort of a remote computer."

 

What other stuff is being "carefully opened" and being resealed?

 



#4833
JorgeA

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An excellent question IMHO.

 

That part, at least, isn't new -- I think that as far back as World War I, the feds were opening people's mail in an effort to root out opponents. I do know (or have been told, anyway) that the FBI developed effective techniques for steaming envelopes open so that then they could reseal them without the recipient's ever knowing.

 

But all that is piecemeal, targeted, and labor-intensive. Today they can do mass surveillance at the click of a mouse button.

 

Here's one bit of fallout from all the nosing around:

 

A New Twist in International Relations: The Corporate Keep-My-Data-Out-of-the-U.S. Clause

 

Some companies are apparently so concerned about the NSA snooping on their data that they're requiring - in writing - that their technology suppliers store their data outside the U.S.

[...]

Thompson said the language began appearing in contracts over the past couple weeks, and could be an early indicator of things to come as businesses adapt to a landscape altered by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden's leaks. Documents leaked by Snowden indicate that the NSA has tapped fiber-optic cables abroad, circumvented or cracked encryption and is massively collecting telephone records and Internet traffic. Facebook, Google, Apple and Yahoo were among 15 technology companies that asked President Barack Obama Dec. 17 to restrain the spy programs. Cisco said Nov. 13 that NSA spying has caused delays to networking equipment orders.

 

U.S.-based technology companies face a serious threat. The NSA disclosures may reduce U.S. technology sales overseas by as much as $180 billion, or 25 percent of information technology services, by 2016, according to Forrester Research Inc., a group in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

* * *

 

Everybody (else) seems to be on vacation this week. I'll keep posting here and there, holding the fort 'til they come back.

 

Happy New Year! :thumbup

 

--JorgeA



#4834
CharlotteTheHarlot

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More rumors on Microsoft's "Threshold" Windows plans pop up ( NeoWin 2013-12-26 )
 

The report begins by claiming that a minor update to Windows 8.1 will be released by the third quarter of 2014, which will help the OS work better with Windows Phone 8.1 and the first major software update for the Xbox One.

[...]

The report also claims that the official start of development for Threshold is supposed to happen by the spring of 2014. However, it adds that could change depending on a number of factors, including the basic issue of making all of this work from a engineering aspect. It's also possible that the new CEO of Microsoft, who will likely be picked early in 2014, might have different plans for Windows.


NeoWin article with supposedly new information but it really just looks like clickbait for NeoKids since there is nothing new or solid that I can see. Using history as a guide, and by that I mean Microsoft always being "a day late and a dollar short" that timeline would be believable, but it will be fatal. In fact it might already be too late. Over this holiday season I was continually stunned by the amount of TV commercials for apps and services which always said "now available for iOS and Android" and never a mention of WP or Windows 8. I almost began to feel sorry for Microsoft and all the NeoKids who must be madder than hell when these commercials air. That also reinforces the huge problem they got themselves into with the stupid idea of not clearly differentiating mobile from the native OS. When an app is for Android or iOS you know you can use it. Thanks to Microsoft Idiocracy even a fabulous hypothetical app written for WP would start out with a disadvantage - no clear platform identification. If they had kept "Metro" and reserved that name for "apps" it would have been so simple. What a disaster. Now the rumors are they will take their time and maybe iron things out in another year! They will be screwed beyond hope.


Two Microsoft Windows veterans depart the company today ( NeoWin 2013-12-31 )
 

Microsoft's Windows team will be without two of their most influential team members when the new year begins on Wednesday. Jon DeVaan, who worked at the company for almost 30 years, has announced he will leave Microsoft along with Grant George. Today is officially the last day for both men at the company.

[...]

According to GeekWire, DeVaan announced his departure on his personal Facebook page Monday. He later sent out an email statement saying, "I am spending time with my family and holding space open to see what opportunities develop." He first joined Microsoft in 1984 and rose through the ranks to become the Corporate Vice President of Windows Development. He is credited with helping to launch Windows 7 after the poor reception to Windows Vista.

[...]

Both DeVaan and George were rumored to be leaving Microsoft for the last few months, as part of the company's reorganization that put Terry Myerson in charge of all operating system development. A few weeks ago, it was revealed that two other major Windows leaders, Ted Dworkin and Jensen Harris, are now a part of Microsoft's Bing team.


Hmmmm, the NeoKids always tell us Sinofsky saved Windows 7 ( yeah right ). Anyway, the carnage continues ( reminds me of lyrics in a famous Black Sabbath song: "In the fields of bodies burning" :lol: ). The comments just got started but already a few are pouring gasoline into the thread. Expect a nice fire.


Google files lawsuit to fight off patent consortium that includes Microsoft ( NeoWin 2013-12-25 )

Google Files Lawsuit Against Apple- and Microsoft-backed Patent Group. Rockstar Consortium under fire after targeting Android. ( Maximum PC 2013-12-26 )
 

Google has decided that enough is enough. The company has filed a lawsuit against Rockstar Consortiuma patent group backed by many of Googles biggest competitorsclaiming that the groups patent campaign is unfairly targeting Google and its Android partners.

[...]

The thousands of patents and patent applications involve core phone technologies like wireless connectivity, networking, and even semiconductors. Googles fighting back with its own lawsuit, and it seems that Rockstars confidence is wavering. Bloomberg recently reported that some of the Nortel patents are already being sold off.


If you can't beat Android, sue 'em and tax 'em. What a perfect case for a sane judge to rollback the patent craziness. Let's hope this one ends well.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#4835
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Microsoft May be Working On New Non-Windows OS ( Tom's Hardware 2013-12-31 )
 

Sources say this new language is codenamed "M#," or M sharp; Duffy names this new language as "C# for Systems Programming." Sources also claim that M# is an extension of Microsoft's C#, and reportedly grew out of Sing#, which is the system language of Microsoft's Research Singularity OS.

There's a possibility the M# platform will go open-source.

ZDNet reports that a "skunkworks" team began working on Midori since at least 2008. The project was originally "championed" by Microsoft CTO Eric Rudder, and the team itself consisted of all-star Microsoft veterans, including Duffy. The project also had several developers pulled in from the outside.

Ultimately, what's expected to happen is that parts of this operating system will be pulled out to be used in Windows 9 and beyond.


Well that is way, way too much speculation there. And I suspect any such plans are subject to scrapping at a moment's notice considering the disaster that Microsoft Tiles has become. If they cannot even get traction with a captive monopolized OEM channel and with the obvious ability to kill the competition by decree ( Windows 7 and Windows XP ) and with the benefit of a multi-billion dollar advertising budget, then what hope does some little geek project have in this bureaucracy. None. They're spinning their wheels. My bet is that this kind of research has but one goal - to lock up ideas into patents to be pulled out of their hat later to thwart actual open source or even retail efforts.


Windows 8.1 Causing Wi-Fi Connectivity Issues ( Tom's Hardware 2013-12-30 )
 

A Microsoft rep explains that a limited connection means the device has connected to a router, but the PC wasn't assigned a valid IP address. However, Internet connection problems are most commonly caused by disconnected cables or by routers and modems that aren't working correctly, the rep says. The rep then points to links for wired and wireless network problems, and why users can't connect to the Internet.

"This is horrible response and I've seen it given by other MS engineers," another complaint reads. "Thousands of people are having this problem since the 8.1 release. I highly doubt all of us had our routers go bad at the same time. Own up to this Microsoft and please fix it. The standard response will not cut it anymore."


I love it. No connection and the best answer is to visit a website, such is the built-in problem to client-server models. It reminds me of in the mid-1980's getting told that some big-iron terminals went down ( 3270's all over a huge building ) and the easiest way to find them was to walk around the plant and look for people slacking off and talking or missing from their station. :lol: The funny thing is that as more Microsoft devices arrive on the scene ( well that's their plan ) and less OEM devices, something different will happen this time around. These support calls are going to wind up at Microsoft rather than at Dell or HP. They got off easy in the past as the OS software supplier, even though so many problems originated from the OS itself they managed to divert attention from themselves to the poor OEM hardware maker. It was quite an accomplishment. I'm not sure they really thought this whole thing through.


Microsoft offers free 30-day subscription to New York Times on Windows devices ( NeoWin 2013-12-29 )

As it turns out there is no promotion from Microsoft here, it was merely a NYT offer seen on the Microsoft Store that for some strange reason NeoWin took as a Microsoft promotion ( and the page still stands that way ). Whatever.

But when I first read this what came to mind was something completely different than the NeoKids would think of, and that is some MicroSheep reading the NYT on their Microsoft Tiles device and then getting news on the Snowden leaks. :lol: NeoWin has this image in the article. But I made my own instead which shows some of the headlines from the past few months that the fanboys might have missed ...
 

xMljHaG.gif
( Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 )


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#4836
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Infamous NSA leaker Edward Snowden says he's "already won" ( TechSpot 2013-12-23 )

Snowden cites Orwell in Christmas message ( New York Post 2013-12-26 )

Orwell? Snowden "already won"? :yes: Absolutely can't argue with either of those points. But if he won then who lost? The Feds? :no: No. The real losers are not the government spooks, but the peasants I mean citizens of all countries because we are witnessing a worldwide phenomenon where all "governments", the ruling class are erecting a deep network of spying, not to protect their sheeple from terrorist bombings, but as the eyes and ears components of their Praetorian guardship. They are dug in, thorough and omnipresent and with the remaining exception of murder and genocide ( even this is debatable ) they have long left the infamous pioneers of the police state - the SS and KGB, in the rear view mirror. Snowden is clearly the "man of the year" in my book, and favorite for "man of the century". I wonder if there are any people around who haven't been surprised by the content of the leaks. BTW, you really got to give credit to the reporters in this case, particularly Glenn Greenwald at the Guardian ( and I can't believe I just said that ~ahem~ ). They are using a smart strategy of a continuous parade of information rather than dropping them all at once. Had they done the latter the story would have been effectively countered and many details would have been already lost to short term memory. Now each and every facet of the spying is being scrutinized. A New Year's toast to these folks. :yes:


Security firm RSA "categorically denies" accepting money from NSA to use flawed crypto code ( TechSpot 2013-12-23 )

RSA Denies Secret $10 Million Contract With NSA ( Tom's Hardware 2013-12-26 )

Very slippery statements from what I have read. You guys want credibility? Then do a non-restricted interview with Bruce Schneier and even competitors and answer their questions. For example, when did you first learn of the backdoor in Dual_EC_DRBG, and when did you warn your customers about it. And that would be the easiest question I would expect. The fact of the matter is that the spooks would have an elaborate web of plausible deniability concocted for all the private companies they compromise, consisting of answers that avoid perjury yet seemingly absolve them of obvious cooperation. This is quite a mess we have here and for all we know every single company has been compromised. Therefore we will need to crucify a few of them to start rolling back this thing.


NSA Lawsuit Attorney: Ignore White House Panel ( U.S. News & World Report 2013-12-23 )
 

One suggestion from the panel is that the NSA's collection of all American phone records be discontinued and replaced with the voluntary two-year-or-longer retention of those records by phone companies. The records could then be acquired in non-emergency cases by court order.

Michelle Richardson, legislative counsel with the ACLU's Washington Legislative Office, tells U.S. News such a measure might eliminate an important "de facto civil liberties protection" by making the data available for civil and criminal cases when it otherwise might not have been.

"I share the same concern, if not horror," Klayman says. "You cannot trust Verizon and the other companies."


Yeah, wouldn't that be the perfect pea under the shell game. The government spooks compromise all the companies we have and then in parallel do their own spying, and if they ever get caught with their hand in the cookie jar, just fallback to letting the companies do their dirty work. Important Note: this story came out before the latest ruling on the case where the government won on appeal.


Metadata Not Anonymous at All, Stanford Researchers Show ( Tom's Hardware 2013-12-26 )
 

If you're not concerned about government surveillance of your phone because the National Security Agency (NSA) only collects metadata, think again. A study from Stanford University shows that connecting "anonymous" metadata to compromising personal information is trivially easy.

[...]

A research team operating out of Stanford University disagrees, and hopes to prove its point with a new Android app called MetaPhone. By accessing your phone number and your Facebook page, this app does what any NSA program could do: It acquires your metadata, then correlates it with your social-media information to see how much it can learn about you.

[...]

When Tom's Guide tried the app, we found that the results supported Stanford's assertion: Dozens of different organizations had the phone number we tried on file. The NSA or worse, a cybercriminal would be able to find our name, our geographic location, our bank, our medical facilities and even our eating habits with just a simple cross-check online.


Not news to anyone here but perhaps enlightening to the sheeple. Well probably not.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#4837
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Already mentioned by Jorge, this stuff is very important IMHO ...

Shopping for Spy Gear: Catalog Advertises NSA Toolbox ( Der Spiegel 2013-12-29 )

NSA intercepting PC shipments to install spyware ( NeoWin 2013-12-29 )

The NSA Has An Elite Team Of Hackers Nationwide ( Tom's Hardware 2013-12-30 )

Leaked NSA document claims covert program grants complete access to the iPhone ( TechSpot 2013-12-31 )

NSA Reportedly Hijacks PCs to Install Spyware, Has Backdoor Access to iPhones ( maximum PC 2013-12-31 )
 

After years of speculation that electronics can be accessed by intelligence agencies through a back door, an internal NSA catalog reveals that such methods already exist for numerous end-user devices.

[...]

A document viewed by SPIEGEL resembling a product catalog reveals that an NSA division called ANT has burrowed its way into nearly all the security architecture made by the major players in the industry -- including American global market leader Cisco and its Chinese competitor Huawei, but also producers of mass-market goods, such as US computer-maker Dell.

[...]

The specialists at ANT, which presumably stands for Advanced or Access Network Technology, could be described as master carpenters for the NSA's department for Tailored Access Operations (TAO). In cases where TAO's usual hacking and data-skimming methods don't suffice, ANT workers step in with their special tools, penetrating networking equipment, monitoring mobile phones and computers and diverting or even modifying data. Such "implants," as they are referred to in NSA parlance, have played a considerable role in the intelligence agency's ability to establish a global covert network that operates alongside the Internet.

[...]

The ANT division doesn't just manufacture surveillance hardware. It also develops software for special tasks. The ANT developers have a clear preference for planting their malicious code in so-called BIOS, software located on a computer's motherboard that is the first thing to load when a computer is turned on.

This has a number of valuable advantages: an infected PC or server appears to be functioning normally, so the infection remains invisible to virus protection and other security programs. And even if the hard drive of an infected computer has been completely erased and a new operating system is installed, the ANT malware can continue to function and ensures that new spyware can once again be loaded onto what is presumed to be a clean computer. The ANT developers call this "Persistence" and believe this approach has provided them with the possibility of permanent access.

 
Well, IMHO this latest revelation is nothing short of huge. :yes: We are getting into black bag jobs here and it could lead to big problems for the spooks and those who authorize and enable them. It pretty much indicates that nothing is safe anywhere, the cloud, the comm traffic there and back, or even the local hardware and software. Ironically we were just musing a few weeks ago about the possibility of compromised BIOS code with respect to laptop webcams, and now this thing pops up describing it in a generic fashion. It is a must-read article at Der Spiegel, focusing on several spook methods including grabbing devices in transit to your door, installing bugs and then letting them go on their way. No part of the Fourth Amendment appears to be in effect any longer and at the end of this controversy we just might be looking at the end of these agencies. The Church Committee didn't have a fraction of the evidence we are now seeing, let alone outright crimes against key Amendments in the Bill of Rights. This is shaping up to be the single biggest story in USA history and is on course now to possible revolution. Well, that is if the sheeple ever wake up.
 
The next story, the updated ruling on the recent case dovetails right here very nicely ...


Judge rules NSA phone tracking legal ( Politico 2013-12-27 )

NSA collection of phone data is lawful, federal judge rules ( Washington Post 2013-12-27 )
 

A federal judge in New York ruled Friday that the massive collection of domestic telephone data brought to light by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden is lawful, rejecting a challenge to the program by the American Civil Liberties Union.

The decision marked a victory for the government less than two weeks after a District Court judge ruled against it, finding that the NSAs program was almost certainly unconstitutional. If the split in rulings continues through the appeals process, it is likely the Supreme Court will have to decide the issue.

In a 53-page opinion, U.S. District Judge William H. Pauley III said Friday that the program, which collects virtually all Americans phone records, represents the U.S. governments counter-punch to eliminate the al-Qaeda terrorist network and does not violate the Fourth Amendment, which prohibits unreasonable search and seizure.

 
Here's a photo of the perp I mean judge, found on this page. Apparently nothing violates the Fourth Amendment and nothing ever will as long as it is couched in anti-terrorism rationale. In other times this honorless idi0t would be tarred and feathered by now. Personally I would support construction of a tall circular skyscraper where each room is a prison cell dead center in Arlington National Cemetary where all our tyrants and their enablers would be sentenced to hard time in solitary confinement staring out at the acres and acres of granite and marble monuments to so many that died protecting that Constitution. Even that would be too good for them though.
 

nbbruckenthal-funeral-services-photo-03.

Playing Taps, but for a lone soldier or the Constitution itself? ( Image Source: Arlington National Cemetery )


BTW, here is a flashback to six years ago when the government seemingly anticipated the current mess and granted the telcos immunity from lawsuits:

New Federal Wiretap Law Granting Phone Companies Retroactive Immunity Challenged in Court ( LawReader 2008-10-18 )
 

The law, passed in July, granted retroactive protection to AT&T, Verizon and other companies against lawsuits accusing them of illegally sharing their telephone and e-mail networks and millions of customer records with the National Security Agency. The NSA began monitoring Americans communications with alleged foreign terrorists, without court warrants, after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.


They are of course talking about the FISA court Amendments in 2008 where they allowed the phone companies to become their partners with nothing to lose by granting immunity from lawsuits. Remember how that turned out? From that wikipedia page ...
 

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) filed a lawsuit challenging the FISA Amendments Act of 2008 on the day it was enacted. The case was filed on behalf of a broad coalition of attorneys and human rights, labor, legal, and media organizations whose ability to perform their workwhich relies on confidential communicationscould be compromised by the new law.[24] The complaint, captioned Amnesty et al. v McConnell and filed in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, argued that the eavesdropping law violated people's rights to free speech and privacy under the First and Fourth Amendments to the Constitution.[25] The case was dismissed from the district court on the grounds that the plaintiffs could not prove their claims, but was revived in March 2011 by the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, which disagreed.[26] The subsequent citation was Amnesty v. Blair. On February 26, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court dismissed the lawsuit, deciding that the plaintiffs did not have standing to sue.[27]


That sure is some twisted rigged system they got going. No way to lose!  :yes:

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#4838
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Target admits encrypted debit card PIN data was stolen during Black Friday hack ( TechSpot 2013-12-27 )

Target Says Hackers Stole Encrypted PIN Numbers ( Tom's Hardware 2013-12-27 )

Target: Encrypted PIN numbers taken in recent credit card data theft ( NeoWin 2013-12-27 )
 

Unnamed sources close to the Target hacking incident revealed last week have confirmed with Reuters that encrypted personal identification numbers (PINs) were also stolen. One major U.S. bank even fears that the thieves will be able to crack the encryption code and make huge, fraudulent withdrawals from consumer bank accounts.

A Target rep reassured Reuters on Friday that "no unencrypted PIN data was accessed," and so far there is no evidence to support talk that PIN data was "compromised." However, the rep did confirm that some encrypted data was stolen, but did not say that PINs were part of the theft.


Jeez Louise, this one can't get much worse now can it? Will anyone learn anything from this, probably not. Folks are too busy connecting their Christmas presents online as we speak, opening accounts, buying junk, you know, business as usual.


Snapchat Exposed: Angry Hackers Post Exploit Code Online ( Tom's Hardware 2013-12-27 )

Four months later, your phone number is still accessible to Snapchat hackers ( NeoWin 2013-12-27 )
 

Australian hackers have just given private instant-messaging service Snapchat its worst Christmas present ever. Detailed code for two Snapchat exploits is now publicly available online, as is Snapchat's API (application programming interface), thanks to the security firm that first found the flaws.

The Snapchat app, for iOS and Android, lets users send each other picture messages that self-destruct a few seconds after being opened so that no one other than the sender and recipient can see them. Intended to appeal to the security-minded, Snapchat has gained a reputation as a means of transmitting salacious and pornographic images. The app is also popular with teenagers looking to communicate outside their parents' watchful eyes, according to some reports.

One of the two posted exploits could be used to search Snapchat's entire user base for individuals' names and numbers approximately 8 million accounts, according to a Nielsen study. The other could be used to create unlimited dummy Snapchat accounts in bulk. Together, the two exploits could undermine Snapchat's supposedly secure messaging service.

 
Hacker compromised BBC server, tried to sell access on underground forum ( TechSpot 2013-12-30 )

BBC FTP Server Hacked And Access Sold for Christmas ( Tom's Hardware 2013-12-30 )
 

A well-known Russian hacker recently gained access to one of the BBCs servers prior to Christmas Day and tried to sell access to it on an underground forum according to cyber security firm Hold Security LLC. The company, which monitors black market forums for such activity, said the site that was compromised was a file transfer protocol at ftp.bbc.co.uk.


And another week, another round of exploits and hacks. Hey, that cloud thing is really coming along nicely don't ya think?


IBM Patents Data Encryption Technique For Cloud Computing ( Tom's Hardware 2013-12-26 )
 

IBM has patented a new data encryption technique, called "fully homomorphic encryption." Under other encryption techniques, data must be decrypted before it can be analyzed; fully homomorphic encryption allows data stored anywhere to be analyzed without compromising its security.


Ummm, what? So I guess that means they can say to the public: 'don't worry it's encrypted' and then let the spooks do their thing? This puts a whole new coat of lipstick on this pig.

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#4839
CharlotteTheHarlot

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NPD: Chromebooks claim 21 percent of all U.S. commercial notebook sales so far in 2013 ( NeoWin 2013-12-25 )

Chromebooks accounted for 21 percent of all notebook sales through November ( TechSpot 2013-12-30 )
 

If you are wondering why Microsoft is now suddenly launching TV commercials that claim Chromebooks are not real notebooks, the latest U.S. sales figures for PC and tablet sales from the NPD Group research firm may be a big clue. According to their newest report, Chromebooks claimed 21 percent of all commercial channel-based notebook sales and eight percent of all commercial PC and tablet sales in the US between January to November 2013.

The report adds that in the first 11 months of the year, 1.76 million Chromebooks and Android-based tablets were sold, compared to just 400,000 units in 2012. By contrast, Windows notebooks showed no sales growth in the past year, according to NPD, although sales of Windows desktops did rise up by 10 percent in 2013.

The spike in Chromebooks sales is good news for Google, along with its third party OEM partners like HP, Dell, Samsung, Acer and others who have all released notebooks based on Chrome OS in the past year. The news isn't as good for Microsoft, which now sees Chromebooks as a real threat to its Windows OS-based laptop sales.

 

If the planned rebellion against Microsoft Windows at next month's Consumer Electronics Show wasnt enough to keep Redmond up at night, the latest notebook sales figures from The NPD Group will likely do the job. The consumer market research firm found Chromebooks accounted for 21 percent of all notebook sales and nearly 10 percent of all computer sales through November.


And that first story there was from NeoWin! Wow. Who knew. And you gotta love it when the leadoff comment at NeoWin is "Well isn't that a surprise. Neowin made me believe that these things are garbage. Seeing just how many different manufacturers are releasing them, looks like they got more OEM support than RT." because when the NeoKids read that story and that comment all manner of hilarity ensues :yes:


Apple signs deal with world's largest mobile carrier ( NeoWin 2013-12-27 )
 

According to reports, Apple has finally signed a deal with China Mobile, the world's largest mobile phone carrier with over 750 million subscribers. The multi-year deal will allow consumers on China Mobile's network to purchase the iPhone 5C and iPhone 5S, and the phones will be sold in China Mobile and Apple retail stores starting January 17th.


And that means it is pretty much game over for Windows Phone, at least with respect to gaining marketshare compared to the big two. Whatever tiny gains they have made in Europe will be swallowed up by the Chinese tsunami. Microsoft's only chance now is to raise an army and conquer India and then round up and burn all competing phones to even have a chance of a double digit worldwide marketshare, ever. It's over folks. Windows Phone will forever be the desktop Linux of the cellphone universe. Meanwhile NeoWin has a story up called AdDuplex: Nokia Lumia 520 continues to dominate Windows Phone handset market which of course is meant to cheer the NeoKids but which is like saying Metamucil dominates the over-the-counter Procter & Gamble laxative market. :lol:


Laptop Makers are Feeling Skeptical About Convertible Models Heading into 2014. Vendors don't want to get stuck with a bunch of 2-in-1 devices. ( Maximum PC 2013-12-27 )
 

There's still no clear cut indication from consumers whether or not hybrid notebooks that also function as tablets are all that desirable compared to keeping the form factors separate. That being the case, notebook vendors are reportedly having cold feet when it comes to stockpiling 2-in-1 devices, fearing that weak sales could leave them with a bunch of unsold inventory needing to be written off.

0gjnEzA.jpg
( Image Source: Maximum PC )


Hmmmm. Chromebooks being shipped by the formerly loyal and captive OEM network, Microsoft Scroogle and anti-Chromebook commercials, Microsoft apparent about-face on Windows, perhaps they were all seeing inside information a while back and the symptoms are just now manifesting themselves in public. Of course you would never know any of this by reading the NeoKids comments over the past year. They were busy telling us how it would all turn around when the OEM's stopped slacking off and made yet more devices using Microsoft Tiles. But that's not even close to being accurate. It seems the market wants clear delineation between mobile and classic. Now what?

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#4840
CharlotteTheHarlot

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PC makers to rebel against Microsoft Windows at Consumer Electronics Show ( TechSpot 2013-12-27 )
 

Microsoft could find itself in a precarious position at the Consumer Electronics Show early next month in Las Vegas. Thats because a number of computer manufacturers are expected to unveil systems that can simultaneously run Windows and Googles Android mobile platform according to two different analysts as reported by Computerworld.

Tentatively known as PC Plus, these machines will run Windows 8.1 as well as Android apps. Tim Bajarin of Creative Strategies said the initiative would take place through software emulation and was being backed by Intel. He wasnt sure what kind of performance could be expected but it is their way to try and bring more touch-based apps to the Windows ecosystem.

 
Yet even more evidence of a revolt in the OEM channel, or at least serious hedging of bets. How will Microsoft stop the bleeding now I wonder. Everyone warned them about screwing around with the OEM network. By directly competing with them with Surface ( well, at least that was the plan ) they only managed to tick them off. Now the chickens are apparently coming home to roost.


Google's Eric Schmidt on 2014: 'Big data' will be everywhere ( NeoWin 2013-12-30 )

Ummm, ya think? They're already everywhere. And Eric, I already coined that term ( inspired by Big Government and Big Hollywood ) and let me tell you, it is not a compliment. :no: Meanwhile another Microsoft-Google war in the comments of course since that was the entire point of the post.


Steam Machine Review ( NeoWin 2013-12-25 )

How to Install SteamOS ( Maximum PC 2013-12-27 )

A couple of good, and well-documented hands-on experiences. Note that there are severe partition wiping risks from the SteamOS installer that testers should be aware of.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#4841
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Oh I almost forgot! ... Happy New Year to everybody!

fm1.gif ..... izsn.gif ..... 9ps.gif ..... i6g.gif ..... uju.gif


... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#4842
monroe

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I read this story yesterday but I'm sure Charlotte or JorgeA will be able to find more information dealing with it. Nothing is safe anywhere, even if you live in the "back woods" minding your own business ... thinking "just me and my Wi-Fi" !

 

NSA Can Hack WiFi Devices From Eight Miles Away

 

http://www.engadget....ght-miles-away/

 

The NSA may have the ability to intercept data from around the world, but we now know that it has some impressive (and intimidating) equipment for snooping on nearby targets. Security guru Jacob Appelbaum told those at the Chaos Communications Congress this weekend that the NSA's big box of tools includes Nightstand, a custom device that can compromise WiFi networks for the sake of inserting spy software. The Linux-powered device can exploit Windows systems from up to eight miles away; it's unlikely that you'll catch agents wardriving in the parking lot. Nightstand may not see significant use today given that it dates back to 2008, but its existence suggests that the NSA also has newer, more advanced WiFi surveillance gear at its disposal.

 

.... there isn't too much more on the subject, if it's true. Maybe our crack spy news team can find more. They find many links to everything.

 



#4843
JorgeA

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Oh I almost forgot! ... Happy New Year to everybody!

fm1.gif ..... izsn.gif ..... 9ps.gif ..... i6g.gif ..... uju.gif

 

 

I second that motion -- Happy New Year, everyone!

 

--JorgeA



#4844
JorgeA

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[...]NeoWin has this image in the article. But I made my own instead which shows some of the headlines from the past few months that the fanboys might have missed ...
 ( Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 )

 

 

Great you have you back, Charlotte! :thumbup

 

that was a very cool image you posted there, with the cycling headlines. B)  How'd you do that?

 

--JorgeA



#4845
JorgeA

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Target admits encrypted debit card PIN data was stolen during Black Friday hack ( TechSpot 2013-12-27 )

Target Says Hackers Stole Encrypted PIN Numbers ( Tom's Hardware 2013-12-27 )

Target: Encrypted PIN numbers taken in recent credit card data theft ( NeoWin 2013-12-27 )
 


Unnamed sources close to the Target hacking incident revealed last week have confirmed with Reuters that encrypted personal identification numbers (PINs) were also stolen. One major U.S. bank even fears that the thieves will be able to crack the encryption code and make huge, fraudulent withdrawals from consumer bank accounts.

A Target rep reassured Reuters on Friday that "no unencrypted PIN data was accessed," and so far there is no evidence to support talk that PIN data was "compromised." However, the rep did confirm that some encrypted data was stolen, but did not say that PINs were part of the theft.


Jeez Louise, this one can't get much worse now can it? Will anyone learn anything from this, probably not. Folks are too busy connecting their Christmas presents online as we speak, opening accounts, buying junk, you know, business as usual.

 

Gotta wonder how many more of these mass breaches of private info it will take before the public decides that the cloud isn't all that "convenient" after all.

 

--JorgeA



#4846
JorgeA

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The Digital Millennium Copyright Act starts to threaten more than just the freedom to distribute the books and music that other people wrote:

 

Phony copyright claims exploit holes in U.S. Internet law

 

Ecuador, having bargained away virtually all its oil production to China in return for low-interest loans to finance President Rafael Correa’s spendthrift populism, is in dire need of a new export. And the president seems to have found one: tyrannical censorship of his critics.

 

Correa’s increasingly novel inventions for suppressing free speech in his own country are doubtless the subject of much envious chatter whenever Iran, North Korea and the rest of the fellows get together for meetings of Despots R Us. His latest wrinkle: a proposed law that would criminalize wisecracks on Facebook, enforced by placing video cameras in every cybercafe in Ecuador.

 

But now Correa has gone international. He’s using phony copyright claims to force American companies such as YouTube and Google to remove videos and documents that criticize his government.

 

[...]

 

Using a U.S. law known as the Digital Millenium Copyright Act, Ares has claimed it owns everything from a mock wanted poster for the father of a Correa cabinet member accused of raping a child to a left-wing documentary criticizing the government for granting mining concessions to foreign companies.

 

(We pause here for a government-mandated warning that too much irony may be bad for your blood. Irony No. 1: Among the many documents Ecuador has tried to get kicked off the Internet is a series of reports from the country’s intelligence agency about its spying on, yes, the Internet. Which leads us to Irony No. 2: WikiLeaker-in-Chief Julian Assange is holed up in Ecuador’s embassy in London, seeking political asylum for leaking U.S. government documents on, yes, the Internet.)

 

A lot of people may find it difficult to get worked up about Correa pushing around a multinational corporation like Chevron, which is certainly big enough to defend itself.

 

But that misses the point. If Correa is willing to mess with a $200 billion corporation on the Internet, then he’s certainly not going to hesitate to mess with you.

 

Rosie Gray, a reporter for Buzzfeed.com, learned that when she published a story based on leaked government documents that revealed Correa is trying to buy surveillance drones and telecommunications devices that would allow his spies to monkey with people’s cellphones.

 

Ecuador promptly filed a copyright-infringement notice that got the documents supporting her story removed from the Internet. Gray posted them on a different site, and Ecuador got them yanked again.

 

Thanks, Hollywood. But then there's no shortage of One Percenters on Rodeo Drive full of admiration for "populist" Latin thugs, so doubtless they view this as a fringe benefit of their nice little law.

 

--JorgeA

 



#4847
JorgeA

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I read this story yesterday but I'm sure Charlotte or JorgeA will be able to find more information dealing with it. Nothing is safe anywhere, even if you live in the "back woods" minding your own business ... thinking "just me and my Wi-Fi" !

 

NSA Can Hack WiFi Devices From Eight Miles Away

 

http://www.engadget....ght-miles-away/

 

The NSA may have the ability to intercept data from around the world, but we now know that it has some impressive (and intimidating) equipment for snooping on nearby targets. Security guru Jacob Appelbaum told those at the Chaos Communications Congress this weekend that the NSA's big box of tools includes Nightstand, a custom device that can compromise WiFi networks for the sake of inserting spy software. The Linux-powered device can exploit Windows systems from up to eight miles away; it's unlikely that you'll catch agents wardriving in the parking lot. Nightstand may not see significant use today given that it dates back to 2008, but its existence suggests that the NSA also has newer, more advanced WiFi surveillance gear at its disposal.

 

.... there isn't too much more on the subject, if it's true. Maybe our crack spy news team can find more. They find many links to everything.

 

 

Thank you for posting this!

 

An article from The Verge, linked to at the end of the Engadget piece, has a ton more links for anyone who wants the ugly details. Engadget also links to a one-hour YouTube presenation by the guy who disclosed this stuff.

 

Meanwhile, there's an enormous range of responses (some highly technical) in the comments section. The funniest is the one who replies to the suggestion to flood the spooks' keyword detectors:

 

My job is a real pressure cooker. Sometimes I feel like I'm skating on ball bearings. My head could explode at any minute. My new boss likes to terrorize people.

 

My friend Mohammed in Alaska sent me an email the other day. He just turned 47 so he signed it "AK 47" Whenever we get together we have a blast. Especially when our good pal Al Kyda flies in on his own airliner wearing his trademark "skyscraper" footwear.

 

Al Kyda designs children's toys. His new idea of an all-plastic Obama doll is going to explode onto the market. Al has some killer ideas. He figures Washington DC is a good target for big sales. He expects sales to start off with a bang and them mushroom.

 

Gotta go now. Somebody's banging on the front door.

 

:angel

 

--JorgeA



#4848
CharlotteTheHarlot

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The Digital Millennium Copyright Act starts to threaten more than just the freedom to distribute the books and music that other people wrote:
 
[...] 

Thanks, Hollywood. But then there's no shortage of One Percenters on Rodeo Drive full of admiration for "populist" Latin thugs, so doubtless they view this as a fringe benefit of their nice little law.


These things are going to be forever stifling innovation and severely threaten everyone except for the favored few who lobbied to get these special positions in the first place. We could start by having all patents expire in one year, implementing use-it-or-lose-it rules, and perhaps even rotating licensing of public airwaves and channels to stop the consolidation of IP in the hands of conglomerate empires like ABC/NBC/CBS/Fox/etc ( whatever your poison ) who then exploit it by buying up and sitting on music and TV entertainment ( at the expense of the artists and actors who actually did the performance ) and then parcel it back out to Cable/Satellite/etc at extortion prices and double dip by also extorting advertisers ( and that's where we really pay the bill ). It's quite a mess we have here indeed.

 

Great you have you back, Charlotte! :thumbup
 
that was a very cool image you posted there, with the cycling headlines. B)  How'd you do that?


Well that was pretty easy. It is a basic animated GIF. The one picture of a Surface is static in all the frames, the NYT screencaps are real and from the website. They are cropped and dropped in as layers which are resized using Trapezoid/Parallelogram transforms ( I always forget which is which ), that option depending on your editor will appear when you hold the pointer over a handle and pressing CTRL or ALT or SHIFT keys. Once the layers all match the shape of the target area on that Surface screen I then exported a single frame for each one ( I think that was just 6 bitmaps ) and then glued them together in an animated GIF program ( this time was Jasc Animation Shop ), set a few options and rendered it. This time I used "optimized" encoding rather than plain static, which means it actually only saves the "changes" from frame to frame ( rather than like a standard movie which is a sequence of complete frames ), the result is a much smaller file size but at the expense of some compatibility with older viewers and browsers I believe. It is also by definition lossy so you cannot extract out the source images which depending on your goal may be an advantage or disadvantage. But since going from BMP to GIF is already radically lossy it really is a moot point.

 

Meanwhile, there's an enormous range of responses (some highly technical) in the comments section. The funniest is the one who replies to the suggestion to flood the spooks' keyword detectors


Love it. From time to time people do these tricks, but for it to be real effective each participant needs to alter the text slightly and/or add some other bits. It is way too trivial for a computer to deduplicate plaintext. The difference to the spooks of sniffing and capturing 1 million identical texts versus 1 million different texts is night and day. For one thing the latter will exponentially multiply the storage and processing used. I believe there are some webpage javascript random keyword generators but I don't really want to drop that into Google or Bing at the moment to find them. What they should do is just make a form based randomizer that adjusts a seed text ever so slightly. The idea is sound nonetheless.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#4849
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Windows XP use drops fast; Windows 8.1 moves ahead of Vista in December's OS data ( NeoWin 2014-01-01 )

JQSTe5r.jpg


NeoWin seemingly gets to gloat as Microsoft Tiles posts a minor gain of 1.19% while classic Windows versions fall 1.32%.

The detailed numbers follow ...
 

EDSWx7Y.png

IUhvCgY.png


First the obvious caveat that combining those percentages as I did is not scientific because there is definite overlap ( any system that was updated 8 to 8.1 or even XP to 7 will quite possibly be double counted ). This problem is exacerbated by the act of adding already smoothed averages ( the statistics total rarely add up to 100% ). Finally, we really don't have any explanation of Net Marketshare methodology at all. It is already quite suspect for obvious reasons considering several adjustments made previously that render comparisons between different reporting periods ridiculous and useless.

Having said that, it looks like the MetroTard versions gained approximately 1 percentage point in Q4, while classic Windows lost approximately 1/2 a percentage point ( that's from a quick eyeballing, I'll return after the storm with better quarterly details ).

One other footnote. NeoWin had this story hours before the actual statistics were available on the website. I did check, multiple times but only the November numbers were posted, yet NeoWin had already ran the article with a screenshot included. This means that NeoWin has some different access to this commercial company's data which indicates something is amiss.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#4850
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Court Rules No Suspicion Needed for Laptop Searches at Border ( ACLU 2013-12-31 )

U.S. Government: We can take your laptop and phone at the border ( NeoWin 2014-01-01 )

BROOKLYN A federal court today dismissed a lawsuit arguing that the government should not be able to search and copy peoples laptops, cell phones, and other devices at border checkpoints without reasonable suspicion. An appeal is being considered. Government documents show that thousands of innocent American citizens are searched when they return from trips abroad.


Another day, another enabling of the police state by government courts. What a system we got going here. It's almost as if everything is rigged. Wake up sheeple!

OFF-TOPIC ...Well, this is probably my last post until the latest snowstorm passes and God forbid any power blackout. Batten down the hatches everyone, if you are almost anywhere in the middle to east USA there is a major storm incoming. For us, we are expecting about 24 hours and at a foot of new snow. Unfortunately that's the easy part. It will be followed up with the coldest day of winter so far ... 10 degrees to -10 degrees high/low ( and yes, that is Fahrenheit where zero is actually cold ).

This kind of storm really sucks because it leaves a tiny window of opportunity to shovel all the white sh stuff before it freezes into solid Arctic ice sheets. Hours and days worth of time is pre-scripted in advance, and there is nothing you can do about it but accept it. Kinda like hurricane Irene when it was just sprinkling days before but you knew you had 10 inches of rain and flooding incoming on a timeline and you could do nothing about it. I hate winter!

Stay safe and see you on the other side of this thing, I hope.
 

2fj.gifjspy.gifsvrq.gif

( Image Sources: 1,2,3 )


... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...





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