UltimateSilence

Why Windows Vista (SP1+) is Better Than Windows 7

38 posts in this topic

I've been saying this since before Windows 7 came out so it's nice that there's an article which agrees with this.

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It is unfortunate that by the time SP1 came out, so many people were scared off from Vista. I remember working with one particular client who was looking at switching to Vista but they couldn't get enough performance for their platform. So they shelved the project. When SP1 RTMed I tested it with their demo system and it was a lot faster. I told them but at that point they had gone to "waiting for Windows 7" or switch to Embedded mode.

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I hope it was alright to post this.

It definitely is.

There's a few users that share that opinion for sure. But the vast majority much prefer Win7, myself included. I used Vista for a while and I was pretty happy with it, but the taskbar is sooooo much better in Win7. That alone makes me want never to go back.

For the record, I strongly disagree with most of his points (the ones I read anyway):

where’d the QuickLaunch go?

I always turned that feature off to begin with. And it was made redundant with the new taskbar, which he doesn't seem to "get".

Oh, right, it got consumed into the massive start menu.

Massive how? Besides, why does that even matter (I actually make mine bigger)? 99% of the time you just press the start key on your keyboard, type a few letters and press enter. Nevermind that pinning apps is much better than using the start menu for starting most of your common apps, or opening recent (or pinned) document so you find yourself using it a great deal less.

Where’d the Show Desktop icon go?

By the clock. Just a different corner of the screen. That's serious nitpicking and it sounds like "don't you move anything!" to me. Either ways, Win+D or Win+M or Win+Space is much quicker than either. Mousing over to either one is such a huge waste of time, and just how often do you need to see your desktop anyway (unless you rely on desktop icons for everything still, Win95-style)?

Windows Mail

Does he miss outlook express too? There's better clients for free if you're into traditional mail clients, and if you want something full featured/high quality then you use Outlook anyway. And it doesn't really make much sense for MS to maintain 2 different mail clients either, and the one in the Live suite gets updated more often. Total non-issue once more.

Photo Gallery
Movie Maker

Again, they replaced a stale program that only gets security updates, for one in the Live suite that gets updated. Or maybe this guy doesn't like free updates.

DreamScene

Yes, why did they remove a pointless CPU-sucking feature, only to show video on the desktop which you almost never see? I miss this *almost* as bad as Clippy. Nevermind it wasn't part of the standard Vista install either -- it was an *addon*, and *only* for the Ultimate edition too.

The title of that section was "removes features", yet there are no features removed (not like you can't print anymore, or that they removed the start menu), it's just a couple secondary programs that get installed in a different way, not that you can't do stuff anymore. He really blows it out of proportion.

Systray icons being hidden by default is a godsend as far as I'm concerned. It's a great way to solve the problem that every company thinks they must have a pointless icon there. What a pointless waste of space for stuff you never use! And if you actually do use the odd one then it's like 2 clicks to re-add it in the config dialog. It seems like he's the only guy left on earth who still uses these extensively and wants to see them all for some unknown reason. I click that arrow thing less than once a week.

His WMP 12 vs WMP 11 blurb is just a matter of his personal preferences. He has no actual point here in any way... You could use the exact same words while complaining about WMP11 vs WMP12 and you'd be just as right. I guess he needed something to pad his list of non-issues. I find WMP 12 to be better, especially for streaming content (and DLNA support) and also for music shared between PCs. It also supports more formats out of the box.

etc.

The bottom line is: where’s the upgrade?

You mean, besides everything you willingly overlook, fantastic changes you either discount or seem to actively resist (being too set in old ways), etc? Or does "better" for him means not moving anything around (like the show desktop icon or WMP layout), still having a system tray cluttered with useless tray icons -- along with the quickstart bar -- both eating in the taskbar zone (combined with the old large buttons so it's really cramped)?, and in general not really offering any changes that might change the way we work?

I personally find Win7 far better all-around, even though Vista was alright too (better than XP). But if you want a list of things that are better:

-The taskbar. Pinning common apps. Jump lists. Nice, big, easily recognizable icons instead of a crappy large button with text that takes too long to read and a tiny icon you can barely recognize. A million times this. This point alone is reason enough for me to upgrade to Win7. It's very much a game changer as far as I'm concerned. The day I tried it, Vista was dead to me. The rest (everything below and then some) is just icing on the cake.

-Lighter on resources which is a very big deal for almost everyone who actually used both. That includes lots of significant low-level improvements, including many big changes in the video department (new driver model, improved GDI concurrency, reduced memory usage by DWM, etc)

-Tamed UAC.

-DirectX 11. 'nuff said. But not just for games. Direct2D/DirectWrite is great too for new 2D apps.

-Aero Snap. It's a godsend when you work with multiple things open at once and also for moving windows between monitors. Even just for maximizing apps and the like. Using the Windows key + arrows mainly, but snapping Windows to the border is handy sometimes too.

-Desktop slideshow. Much nicer, and far less resource hungry than Dreamscene, and it's not only for the Ultimate edition either.

-SSD TRIM support, since SSDs are getting quite popular

-The improved start menu, including the improved search (I can't remember the last time I went to the control panel directly to find something), seeing recent docs (jump lists) by your apps (the little arrow), being able to change the default "shutdown" action from the start menu to something else you use more often (like reboot), etc

-ISO burning and other nice explorer improvements e.g. copy as path on right click, or the bar that shows how much free space left you have is now also being on USB drives

-Windows XP mode (there's better solutions, but it's still an improvement over Vista's nothing)

-PowerShell 2 out of the box for admins, ditto for the WMI improvements

-.NET framework 3.5 out of the box (great for devs), IIS 7.5 too

-Taskbar icon improvements e.g. progress bars when copying files

-Improved keyboard shortcuts for those of us who use the keyboard a lot

-New calculator, paint and wordpad (IE too)

-Many networking advances, including new VPN tech, an improved RDP protocol, etc. And tons more low-level stuff most people wouldn't know about or understand.

-the Cleartype tuner now being built-in. You mean not only programs get removed? They actually added some? Even some which Vista had removed like the "Internet" games? Oh...

Nevermind countless other features that don't get used often or by not many, like Multi-touch, support newer monitors whose gamut extends over the sRGB color space, the tablet PC input panel (not just useful on tablet PCs -- it's nice to enter math formulas using my Wacom tablet too), MUI improvements, new SAPI voices if you use speech synthesis, etc. There's FAR too much stuff to even attempt to make a complete list.

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There's a few users that share that opinion for sure.

CoffeeFiend,

I'm one of them. :)

My preference for Vista stems as much from esthetic considerations as it does from functional ones. The first time I saw the default Windows 7 desktop, my first thought was -- ugh, how plain and washed-out. And the first word that came to mind when I saw that fat taskbar with the big icons was, "gaudy." (Well, OK, it was a choice Spanish word, but I can't post that here as it would violate at least two Forum rules. ;) )

I also generally dislike hieroglyphics, finding writing much more immediately informative, and so those wordless taskbar icons on the left are annoying. (There's a reason that picture writing fell out of favor millennia ago, isn't there?) To this day, the first thing I do when setting up a new Win7 system is to only "combine when full" the taskbar icons and cut the height of the taskbar in half, so that I can get my preferred written (and discreetly sized) labels back. Now, if there were a way to recreate the "convex" Vista-style taskbar without resorting to error-prone hacks like they have in DeviantArt...

I have found no particular use for "libraries" and I tend to view them as another step (like the "Favorite Links" in Vista's version of Explorer and the "My Documents" link in Win98 Explorer) in the direction of encouraqging the user away from knowledge of the actual locations of files. Just show me the directories where the files are, thank you.

All that said, I do recognize that Windows 7 does feature a number of improvements, and so I view Win7 as a worthy successor to Vista -- and light-years ahead of Windows 8. :puke:

--JorgeA

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quoting guy from article...

challenge someone to list 7 reasons why Windows 7 is better than Windows Vista

1. has MinWin with kernel

2. much better file manager

3. not so agressive with RAM pre-alocating aka eating it

4. much improved taskbar, the old stacking was terrible and thumbnails in vista were useless

5. Win7 was built on top of Vista SP1 codebase, so yeah its better by default

6. is more modular with components/removal than vista is

7. ... ?

I'm missing 7th :P

... so they don’t really count. Those could easily be implemented into Vista

well hell, you can say that for Vista -> XP, XP has capability of many things that Vista had ...

Microsoft later attempted to “prove” that they had fixed Vista with the Mojave Experiment ...

Evidently, over 90% of the participants thought it was great and an improvement over XP

this was a scam, nobody even wondered what uneducated IT people did they pick

and what educated IT ones they did, and how many

Now, if there were a way to recreate the "convex" Vista-style taskbar without resorting to error-prone hacks

there is a way, but doubt you'd want to go that way

Windows 7 build 6801, last one that had Vista taskbar in use (while new taskbar was disabled), and you still get Windows 7 explorer

basically you'd run Vista SP1 with Windows 7 explorer and Direct X 10.1

but no updates would work that of Win 7 RTM/SP1

and you'd have a bit buggier OS with some features missing that are in RTM of 7

Edited by vinifera
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-Aero Snap. It's a godsend when you work with multiple things open at once and also for moving windows between monitors. Even just for maximizing apps and the like. Using the Windows key + arrows mainly, but snapping Windows to the border is handy sometimes too.

I use the snap feature all the time. I was surprised how much I had relied on it. I was recently working on a Vista notebook to clean up for someone (this also happened to me when using an XP) where I tried to snap the window and it just didn't work. It was like when I tried to go back and play GTA Vice City only to find out/remember that you couldn't swim in that version. :blink:

I also had good experience with ReadyBoost, except for the fact that using that feature seems to eat USB keys. I'm not using it now just because I don't have any large keys I'm willing to sacrifice to the cause right now. :(

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challenge someone to list 7 reasons why Windows 7 is better than Windows Vista

1. has MinWin with kernel

2. much better file manager

3. not so agressive with RAM pre-alocating aka eating it

4. much improved taskbar, the old stacking was terrible and thumbnails in vista were useless

5. Win7 was built on top of Vista SP1 codebase, so yeah its better by default

6. is more modular with components/removal than vista is

7. ... ?

1. irrelevant for daily usage. This is only a marketing fact.

2. where is is better? Explorer is mostly the same only rewritten to support libraries but the copy algorithm is the same like it is used since Vista Sp1.

3. for me Vista is better (500MB usage compared to 800MB from Windows 7 when using 32Bit and 800MB compared to 1.6GB when using the 64Bit Versions). So Vista is all times much better in terms of memory usage. Also apps start slower in Win7 because of Cache Manager/Superfetch changes to suggest users Win7 uses less RAM. overall Win7 is here disappointing.

4. This is the only advantage of Windows 7, the progressbar in the taskbar. This is the ONLY feature I miss in Vista.

taskbar_icon_status_bar.jpg

Edited by MagicAndre1981
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2. so much easier to use not crowded and klunky as vista's

they made it better by separating things in groups

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? I still don't understand what you mean :blink:

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the left nav bar

in seven its more appropriate separated

making groups of separate things

while vista has it all squeezed together making using it like crap

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I'm one of them. :)

And there's nothing wrong with that either :)

I also generally dislike hieroglyphics, finding writing much more immediately informative, and so those wordless taskbar icons on the left are annoying. (There's a reason that picture writing fell out of favor millennia ago, isn't there?)

It's not like hieroglyphics where the drawing means a word. It's more like an easily and instantly recognizable company logo. And those aren't going out of fashion anytime soon. I find it's far quicker and so much easier to find this way.

All that said, I do recognize that Windows 7 does feature a number of improvements, and so I view Win7 as a worthy successor to Vista -- and light-years ahead of Windows 8. :puke:

Win95's interface is also light-years ahead of Windows 8's.

800MB from Windows 7 when using 32Bit and 800MB compared to 1.6GB when using the 64Bit Versions

Either you're calculating this in a very strange way, or there's a serious problem with your install, or you're doing something completely wrong. I've had both Vista and Win7 boot under half that (no removing components or anything of the sort either). I've even seen people use Win7 on netbooks with 1GB and being happy with the performance, or even someone on this forum who reported happily using it on a machine with 512MB of RAM recently. Seriously, there's no way it the x64 version uses anywhere near 1.6GB with nothing open, unless you count the cached stuff which would make it a useless metric. Besides, on top of Vista's heavier memory footprint, its DWM is a bloated pig compared to Win7's (Win7 cut down its memory usage by 50%) which is very significant for people who multitask a lot (Vista's DWM always ran out of memory on me). Edit: Google finds tons more people happily using Win7 with 512MB of RAM. Namely, this comparison by Ed Bott which shows yet again as Vista being the worst, and where no scenario mirrors your results in any way.

Either ways, they're both pretty decent OS'es, which we'll probably keep using for quite some time. I don't see myself buying a new version of Windows ever again...

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CoffeeFiend,

Thank you for clarifying that for me.

I want to give my two cents. :lol:

By the clock. Just a different corner of the screen. That's serious nitpicking and it sounds like "don't you move anything!" to me. Either ways, Win+D or Win+M or Win+Space is much quicker than either. Mousing over to either one is such a huge waste of time, and just how often do you need to see your desktop anyway (unless you rely on desktop icons for everything still, Win95-style)?

I think he was upset about the fact that you cannot (re)move it if desired.

I also think it varies from person to person... I still use the desktop more often than not. :ph34r:

-The taskbar. Pinning common apps. Jump lists. Nice, big, easily recognizable icons instead of a crappy large button with text that takes too long to read and a tiny icon you can barely recognize. A million times this. This point alone is reason enough for me to upgrade to Win7. It's very much a game changer as far as I'm concerned. The day I tried it, Vista was dead to me. The rest (everything below and then some) is just icing on the cake.

I love the Windows 7 taskbar. I also feel that there is nothing wrong with its predecessor.

-Tamed UAC.

In Windows Vista, the frequency of UAC notifications can be changed via Local Security Policy.

EDIT: When I looked at the Local Security Policy settings in Vista again, it appears that 7 only has one new UAC option (located in the UAC settings; I haven't checked Windows 7's LSP) and that is the default "Notify me only when programs try to make changes to my computer".

The Windows 7 UAC slider and what you can do on Windows Vista today.

-DirectX 11. 'nuff said. But not just for games. Direct2D/DirectWrite is great too for new 2D apps.

Windows Vista is DirectX 11 compatible. Direct2D and DirectWrite were both back ported to Windows Vista...

Edited by UltimateSilence
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I can't remember when I last time clicked on that show desktop button in corner :P

still using quick launch one :)

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I also had good experience with ReadyBoost, except for the fact that using that feature seems to eat USB keys. I'm not using it now just because I don't have any large keys I'm willing to sacrifice to the cause right now. :(

Tripredacus,

What do you mean by ReadyBoost eating USB keys?

I've been using 4GB of an 8GB CompactFlash card (via a USB card reader) on my 4GB Vista machine for about a year now; after setting it up, things definitely seemed to go faster.

--JorgeA

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