nateowens

Installing xp64 over xp32

6 posts in this topic

I need to install xp 64 on my current system running xp 32 bit

(I have verified that the system is indeed 64 bit, and have run diagnostics from Microsoft verifying the system is ready and compatible for 64 bit OS)

QUESTION 1:

Does installing XP64 require a clean re-installation of all my software (it is 64 bit compatible) ? (Win 7 64 requires this)**

QUESTION 2:

Is it possible, if the installation fails, to reinstall the 32 bit and the software?

**REASON:

All of my software is legal - the problem is it has been multiple upgrades over a period of years (ie: from Photoshop 5 to CS3), and in the case of CS3, it was purchased legally from a 3rd party vendor)

This is the situation with most of my software, I would not be able to provide the original CD or installation .exe file, and the serial numbers would most likely not reflect the original installation

I am not a gamer, I do high end graphics and illustration and use programs like Z Brush and others requiring large memory management capability - the more recent upgrades to these programs demand even larger memory use

Thanks for your help, advice and suggestions.

Nate

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A fresh installation is necessary when going from 32 to 64-bit Windows regardless of Windows version (XP, 2003, Vista or 7). To provide a fail-safe for question 2 I would recommend installing 64-bit on a different drive, and keep your 32-bit Windows installation in a safe place unless it's needed.

To take full advantage of 64-bit memory you will need 64-bit versions of your applications. Unless they came included with the 32-bit versions, you'll likely need to repurchase or exchange them.

Edited by 5eraph
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Thanks - helpful information

This is not my usual turf, so excuse my naive or plain stupid questions and confusion

Your patience is very much appreciated

I am in no way computer tech-savy - I have done illustration for magazines/books/clients for over 40 years - I went all-digital with the art in 1992 (using software like Corel Painter, Photoshop and various 3D apps)

(Some of it here, scroll down), but I'm out of my element here beyond installing memory and additional boards and such

A fresh installation is necessary when going from 32 to 64-bit Windows regardless of Windows version (XP, 2003, Vista or 7). To provide a fail-safe for question 2 I would recommend installing 64-bit on a different drive, and keep your 32-bit Windows installation in a safe place unless it's needed.

When you say to use a different drive

I don't think you are saying that one drive would be operating a 32 bit OS and another drive would be running a 64 bit OS on the same machine?

That's not even possible is it:? I do have an external hard drive that would serve (I think) the purpose for safe-keeping (I suppose disconnecting it during installation would suffice?)

To take full advantage of 64-bit memory you will need 64-bit versions of your applications. Unless they came included with the 32-bit versions, you'll likely need to repurchase or exchange them.

A bit confused (again) on this...

My current system was built from the ground up with no software included - I installed all of the software, some existing at the time and others added later

See the attached images from CPU-Z showing my system specs

I ran the Microsoft compatibility software on my system (this was for Win 7 64bit) and it said that my installed software was 64 bit ready -

Would that diagnostic say that about 32 bit software?

Thanks again for your much needed help

If this undertaking is totally unfeasible, I'll just keep running with what I have

My system specs =

post-358169-0-05798700-1342173870_thumb.post-358169-0-13003800-1342173901_thumb.post-358169-0-85833800-1342173930_thumb.post-358169-0-80159900-1342173979_thumb.post-358169-0-07802600-1342174013_thumb.

Edited by nateowens
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When you say to use a different drive

I don't think you are saying that one drive would be operating a 32 bit OS and another drive would be running a 64 bit OS on the same machine?

That's not even possible is it:? I do have an external hard drive that would serve (I think) the purpose for safe-keeping (I suppose disconnecting it during installation would suffice?)

I was suggesting that you purchase or reuse an existing unused internal hard drive and swap drives in your tower. However, my suggestion will require that you briefly acquaint yourself with the inner workings of your PC which may be beyond your comfort level. To my knowledge XP will not install to an external USB drive easily, if setup allows it at all.

I ran the Microsoft compatibility software on my system (this was for Win 7 64bit) and it said that my installed software was 64 bit ready -

Would that diagnostic say that about 32 bit software?

The compatibility software merely checks to see if the 32-bit software you're using has any known incompatibilities running under 64-bit Windows. The software currently running on your 32-bit XP installation will still run in 32-bit compatibility mode on a 64-bit XP installation.

I don't know the hardware requirements or installation options for the software you're using or how that software directly benefits running under a 64-bit OS. Someone more familiar with your applications should answer those questions.

Edited by 5eraph
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Thanks Seraph for your input

As I figured, I was naive regarding my expectations

The complexity and cost of this procedure are not what I'd hoped, so for now I will continue with the setup I now have

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Just an FYI... you wouldn't have been able to transfer any newer Adobe Products (e.g. Photoshop CS3) and possibly other software anyway without re-activating. You could, however use the "Transfer License" function in Adobe products o "move" it to another compatible OS. There is "special license data" buried in one of the first 64 sectors (can't remember which one ATM) of your HDD.

You could use the "Files and Settings Transfer Wizard" on x86, storing "somewhere else", then Clean Install x64, reinstall all of you after-x86-initial software, then use the Wizard to complete the operation.

However, as pointed out, the only benefit you'll have from x64 is that the OS will be able to access ~>3gb memory (and/or maybe run a little faster) unless you can obtain the x64 version of any User Software (which is still no benefit unless ~>3gb). Also, some Drivers may not work with ~>3gb and you would have to get compatible ones - this may not be a problem since you already checked that. Many OEM PC vendors installed x86 versions on 64-bit hardware for just those reasons.

You could also (if you have room on your HDD) "shrink" the current partition and install the x64 on a second partition and dual-boot (if you want to play around).

Again, just an FYI. Otherwise, stick with the x86 version.

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