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Win XP past Apr 2014... (was: Will XP be supported until 2019?)

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#51
jaclaz

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Windows XP is the first MS OS which needs to be activated. If MS just switches off the activation server, no new XP installations are possible, unless you somehow pull the check, which is against the law.

 

If you have an XP license, which shows no expiration date, and if MS switches off the activation server, does that mean you have the right to do whatever needed to keep it running?

This is debatable.

The essence of the EULA (provided that the EULA actually represents a legally binding contract between you and MS, which in itself is highly debatable) grants you a lifetime right to use that OS, subject to a number of limitations.

In the EULA the part related to activation should be:

 

* Mandatory Activation. The license rights granted under this
      EULA are limited to the first thirty (30) days after
      you first install  the Product unless you supply
      information required to activate your licensed copy in
      the manner described during the setup sequence of the
      Product.  You can activate the Product through the use
      of the Internet or telephone; toll charges may apply.
      You may also need to reactivate the Product if you modify
      your computer hardware or alter the Product.  There are
      technological measures in this Product that are designed
      to prevent unlicensed or illegal use of the Product. 
      You agree that we may use those measures.

 

So, you install the (regularly bought) software,go to install it and - according to the EULA - you actually "supply" to the good MS guys the "information required" AND you do that "in the manner described during the setup sequence of the Product", but they don' t activate the license anymore.

 

Guess who is not fulfilling the obligations in the contract? :unsure:

 

jaclaz




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#52
Soukyuu

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I'm an IT professional and I don't feel Windows XP is the past. Sure, it might be old, but doesn't it still work? Honestly, what does Windows 7 do that Windows XP can't do for a regular user? That's how I really look at a system. Does it do what is needed? If so, why bother changing it? If you love the eyecandy that Windows 7 provides, then by all means, go upgrade ASAP. But if you're looking for productivity, what's wrong with WinXP?

One thing that win7 definitely does better is file operations. I can't count how many times I had to restart a copy/move operation because a single file had an access problem.

Another thing is that winXP's scheduler isn't optimized for more than 2 CPU (cores), from what I remember. Similarly to how win7's scheduler isn't optimized for AMD's dual package design. While win8 got a proper fix, win7 got only a half-hearted one, and winXP got none at all - so even if winXP is "faster" because of low requirements, win7/8 will be able to balance it out due to better hardware optimization.

I myself have used winXP for a long time and liked it, and for older hardware, it's still a good option (that, or linux). On any system with more than two cores however, you're better off with a more modern OS. Win7 is just as stable as winXP and the driver situation is as good, even for older hardware.

The discontinuation of security patches support for winXP probably won't kill it, lack of hardware support though, will. It had a good long life and starting to phase it out is not a bad thing.
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#53
xpclient

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XP is and will remain for me the best computing eXPerience I had. Those Microsoft clowns still haven't got rid of forced auto sorting in Explorer in Windows releases post XP. :realmad: They basically gang-raped the Shell in NT6. Plus XP does not gradually fill up your C drive like Windows 7/Vista do thanks to Component Based Servicing. :thumbdown And don't even get me started on features removed...I will strangle those MS developers if I lay my hands on them. :angrym: Windows 8 is an outright scam that deserves a class action lawsuit for exchanging system features.


Edited by xpclient, 14 August 2013 - 09:33 AM.

Impossible to run NT6 without third party fixes.


#54
CharlotteTheHarlot

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One thing that win7 definitely does better is file operations. I can't count how many times I had to restart a copy/move operation because a single file had an access problem.


This part is unclear to me, you had countless copy/move restarts on WinXP or Win7? Please describee what happened in both OS's so I can understand it.

I also don't get what you mean by "access problem"? File is locked? File is corrupt? How would Win7 allow you to copy either of those? Thing is, you're not supposed to be able to copy locked or defective files through the GUI, it is supposed to break. I haven't noticed Win7 doing away with this error checking. These files are best copied with special tools anyway, sector-wise if need be.

Personally I think the incredibly increased use of aliasing with symbolic links makes for a much tougher job at the file level in Vista-7. Not to mention the dumbed down user interface making use of libraries and other abstractions.

For example, if you hand me a Win7 NTFS system disk to clean up or remove a virus from, and I can either stick that drive in an XP or Win7 machine, I will choose XP because of less added fluff and to be able to get the job done very quickly. This is because the GUI isn't programmed to work against me. Neither GUI is perfect obviously, but Explorer really took a dive in Windows 6 with the dumbing down of hiding much more stuff, and that stupid full-row select.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#55
Soukyuu

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It's quite easy, say you got files A B C D
Some program is locking access to fileB
You attempt to copy those from folderA to folderB

On winXP, it will copy fileA, try to copy fileB, stop with an error message and cancel the transfer
On win7, it will copy fileA, try to copy fileB, skip it, copy files C and D, then notify you that fileB could not be copied. It even pauses the progress and gives you a chance to get access to the file without having to cancel the transfer.

This way, you only have to get access to fileB and copy it over vs having to mark all the other files and copy them as well. While it's not much of a difference with low file count, imagine copying a large amount of files with a non-trivial selection criteria. Every time winXP cancels the transfer you'd have to pick the files once again.

I don't think the explorer took a dive with NT6.x but it does have some annoying bugs in those versions. Speaking of UI working against you, I'd say that's what they did with win8. Forcing modernUI on a desktop was the one big mistake they made, otherwise win8 would be a good upgrade from win7. They did make some good improvements under the hood to make the OS perform better, too bad the UI gets in the way.


Edited by Soukyuu, 14 August 2013 - 12:30 PM.

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#56
vinifera

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 Plus XP does not gradually fill up your C drive like Windows 7/Vista do thanks to Component Based Servicing. :thumbdown

 

I have never experienced this on my win7


If you want true Windows user experience
try Longhorn builds: 3718, 4029, 4066

#57
monroe

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Just a couple more articles dealing with XP ... from the other side. Remember I like XP and intend to stay with it well after 2014.

 

Kill your Windows XP systems, before they kill you!

 

http://hal2020.com/2...-they-kill-you/

 

August 6, 2013

 

Paul Thurrott just published The Coming Windows XP Apocalypse reminding us that support, including security patches, for Windows XP is coming to an end.  For a more in-depth examination on why you need to run from Windows XP as fast as you can see my blog entry from two years ago.

 

Last month I experienced just how difficult it was going to be to fully put the nail in the coffin of Windows XP.  I went to the open house for a new hospital and when touring around noticed that their PCs were running Windows XP.  That’s right, a new deployment of XP in a mission critical environment just months before all support for XP ends.  Oh, and a new deployment in an environment with extreme privacy requirements.  In an environment in which malware could quite literally cause loss of life.  I tweeted about this and someone from Microsoft already went off to work on making sure the hospital had a migration plan in place.

 

No doubt a new deployment of Windows XP is not done because the IT department desired it.  All controversy about Windows 8 aside, Windows 7 is something IT can and does have a love fest with.  The problem is likely ISV software, and support for specialized hardware, that hasn’t yet made the migration to Windows 7.  Or perhaps in this case, the hospital’s parent organization has a migration plan but this hospital was opening before the rest of the organization was ready to migrate.  Let’s just hope they complete the migration in time.

 

There are a few points about Windows XP usage and what happens when support ends in April 2014 that I wanted to make.

 

First, the Netapplication numbers Paul used are worldwide numbers.  Netapplication wants $300 to let you filter by country, which I think is fair except that I can’t justify paying them just so I can write a blog article.  Using StatCounter data we see that July 2013 worldwide XP usage is 20.45% while US usage is 11.67%.    Note how StatCounter and Netapplication (37% worldwide XP share) differ dramatically because of methodology.  And the truth is that actual market share may be quite different than either of them report, because lots of systems in business are not used for web browsing (which is how both gather their data).  All that matters is that Windows XP usage is still quite substantial no matter what the actual number or its source.

 

The worldwide numbers may greatly overstate the situation in individual countries or regions.  For example according the StatCounter Windows XP remains the most used operating system in China at 54.69%.  By contrast Australia is at about 9%.   This also explains why the drop in Windows XP usage appears to be slowing.  In some countries the move away from Windows XP is almost over while in others it has barely begun.  And for the latter, often dominated by pirated copies, it isn’t clear that the loss of support holds much meaning.  Thus they just aren’t moving!

 

... more to the article at the link.

 

also

 

The Coming Windows XP Apocalypse

 

What will it take to get businesses off Window XP?

 

http://windowsitpro....s-xp-apocalypse

 

Paul Thurrott

 

Aug. 6, 2013

 

 The clock is ticking. In April 2014, just 8 months from now, Microsoft will finally stop supporting Windows XP, an OS that was released 12 years and three major Windows releases ago. But here’s a sobering statistic that should give anyone pause: Despite this impending deadline, XP usage has barely changed in all of 2013. What gives?

 

If you’re a fan of numbers, head over to Netmarketshare.com, NetApplication’s site for usage share statistics. They measure web browser usage share, search engine usage share, and operating system usage share, and it is of course that latter measurement that I’m focused on this week. According to the firm, Windows XP still accounted for over 37 percent of all desktop OS usage share in July 2013, behind Windows 7 (44.5 percent) but well ahead of Windows 8 (5.4 percent), Vista (4.24 percent), or the most recent Mac OS X version (3.3 percent).

 

What the…?

 

No matter how you measure things, this is a disaster in the making. Over the first 7 months of 2013, usage in Windows XP has declined only 2.3 percentage points (from 39.51 percent in January to 37.2 percent in July), just behind Windows 8’s tepid rise of 3.1 percentage points (from 2.3 percent in January to 5.4 percent in July). And Windows 7 has remained at virtually the same usage this entire year.

 

Put another way, if Microsoft’s estimate of 1.5 billion active Windows users is correct, there are over 510 million PCs still running Windows XP on this planet. 510 million. Over half a billion.

 

While I don’t have any accurate figures on what percentage of these half billion PCs are in enterprises and other businesses, I think it’s fair to say that most of them are still in businesses. Anecdotally, XP machines are to PCs as BlackBerries are to smartphones, not systems that individuals choose for themselves but rather machines that are pushed on them by employers.

 

With Windows 8, Microsoft is pushing a new world of the consumerization of IT and of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), two concepts that were basically science fiction in the superglued USB port days of 2001, when XP first shipped. XP has lived through three two-term US presidencies and was most notable in its day for being the OS that finally moved customers off the aging DOS-based Windows 9x codebase that dated back to 1985. This thing isn’t just venerable, it’s ancient history.

 

But it is perhaps somewhat ironic that XP’s continued popularity—if we might call it that—is at least partially the fault of Windows 8, which does aim very high with its modern ideals: a touch-centric UI that is optimized for tablets and seems aimed at killing off the desktop environment that is so familiar and dear to Windows users. Here we are in the last year of XP’s lifecycle, and Microsoft has released a version of Windows that virtually no XP user seems particularly interested in.

 

... more of the article at the link

 



#58
jaclaz

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Paul Thurrot defining (administrative) hospital PC's "mission critical"? :w00t:

 

What would he do if he knew that the military/LE have used XP (and are still using it) widely?

http://reis.ca/why-s...ith-windows-xp/

http://www.wired.com...ts-drone-fleet/

(please note the reference to drones ;))

 

And what about the NASA?

http://blogs.msdn.co...l-software.aspx

 

jaclaz



#59
lolnousernameforyou

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Paul Thurrot defining (administrative) hospital PC's "mission critical"? :w00t:

 

What would he do if he knew that the military/LE have used XP (and are still using it) widely?

http://reis.ca/why-s...ith-windows-xp/

http://www.wired.com...ts-drone-fleet/

(please note the reference to drones ;))

 

And what about the NASA?

http://blogs.msdn.co...l-software.aspx

 

jaclaz

Oh I'm not worried about the military they probably have some special deal with M$ to still get the updates.



#60
jaclaz

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Oh I'm not worried about the military they probably have some special deal with M$ to still get the updates.

 

It seems to me like you missed the point.

 

XP with all the updates in the world +1 (and even one more) as well as ANY MS OS, excluding (possibly) DOS, is NOT suitable to be used in "critical missions".

 

You see, a "critical mission" - is by definition - critical. ;)

 

You cannot afford to have it bluescreen in  a "critical mission".

 

http://walyou.com/wo...creen-of-death/

 

Additionally, you may want to use a RTOS (Real Time Operating System) for an actual "critical mission".

 

jaclaz



#61
CharlotteTheHarlot

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Just a couple more articles dealing with XP ... from the other side. Remember I like XP and intend to stay with it well after 2014.
 
Kill your Windows XP systems, before they kill you!
 
http://hal2020.com/2...-they-kill-you/

 
Yeah, that Hal guy is a piece of work. He's a definite Softie or ex-Softie, perhaps Formfiller can confirm this since I see that Hal is mentioned over at TechBroil from time to time.
 
Notably, the first and only place that Sinofsky showed up and commented at, the very next day after he was fired was at the Hal2020 site, see here. Other shills are also posting there like Peter not-so-Bright.
 
I mentioned that Thurrott article over in the big thread. Quite a FUD-fest these shills got going. Apocalypse Now! :lol:


... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#62
CharlotteTheHarlot

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It's quite easy, say you got files A B C D
Some program is locking access to fileB
You attempt to copy those from folderA to folderB

On winXP, it will copy fileA, try to copy fileB, stop with an error message and cancel the transfer
On win7, it will copy fileA, try to copy fileB, skip it, copy files C and D, then notify you that fileB could not be copied. It even pauses the progress and gives you a chance to get access to the file without having to cancel the transfer.

This way, you only have to get access to fileB and copy it over vs having to mark all the other files and copy them as well. While it's not much of a difference with low file count, imagine copying a large amount of files with a non-trivial selection criteria. Every time winXP cancels the transfer you'd have to pick the files once again.

I don't think the explorer took a dive with NT6.x but it does have some annoying bugs in those versions. Speaking of UI working against you, I'd say that's what they did with win8. Forcing modernUI on a desktop was the one big mistake they made, otherwise win8 would be a good upgrade from win7. They did make some good improvements under the hood to make the OS perform better, too bad the UI gets in the way.

 
Okay, I see what you are getting at. So it's the handling of locked files from Explorer that is important to you. Indeed this is a definite improvement should you find yourself in this predicament on Vista-7-8. To tell the truth I just hadn't noticed that in over 7 years now! Most likely because I try to avoid that dumbed down interface by just popping the disk into an XP system and doing file stuff unencumbered by the new GUI training wheels.
 
After all these years since Windows XP came along ( which really stepped up the "locked" file enforcement compared to Win9x ) I just developed a habit of canceling the dialog, then de-selecting the locked file and repeating the copy and continuing. Windows has always been full of annoyances like this and you just compensate. Naturally this is not possible when you are copying folders full of files though. This is one of those classic +/- decision matrix where the question becomes: is it worth it?
 
For example, if someone had asked me about fixing this locked file problem ( which is clearly ridiculous for "copy" but not "move" obviously ) I would have said, yeah, why not, fix your mess. But if they said that while they're fixing it they would also clobber the user interface, dumbing it down for the n00bs out there, I would have suggested they skip the whole idea and just leave it alone.
 
The Windows 6.x GUI is another step towards Idiocracy ( Metro being a long jump ). I'm not against it, even sheeple need an interface, but not at the expense of everyone else. Fixing these little things would be great but not when they in turn give us that absurd file collision dialog designed by a committee of blind bureaucrats. They could have fixed this stuff and then provided tick box options to allow non-n00bs the ability to re-define these sorts of things back to sanity.
 
It reminds me of when Windows XP gave us the crazy mathematical file sort ( treating filenames as values instead of labels ) which drove lots of people mad. Microsoft screwed this one up and users were forced to solve it themselves by creating the tick box preference through a REG script toggling between the file sorting methods ( here's what my own custom version looks like ). Naturally this cannot work if GUI functions themselves no longer contain the code that looks at preferences in the registry in the first place, and this is where Microsoft is headed.

 


... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#63
Soukyuu

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I do agree they are dumbing the interface down, but they're not the only ones. It seems to be a trend in all 3 major OS branches, be it windows, linux (gnome3 anyone?) or apple. I also agree that it's a matter of deciding between coping with present annoyances and upgrading and having to cope with new ones. In case of winXP I usually just replaced the file copier with teracopy or comparable and was done with it. XP losing security updates though would move me to an upgrade.

 

I guess about the only reason I upgraded to Vista SP1 and then win7 was because I'm getting the OSes for free from MSDNAA. So far, I didn't feel win7 lacks anything compared to XP, and the annoyances are minor compared to, say, ModernUI on win8.


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#64
monroe

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CharlotteTheHarlot ... thanks for clearing that up with the Thurrott article. When I read it, I felt I had already read it from somewhere ... should have checked the "big thread" a little better ... a little bit of everything in there ! ... educational for me.

 



#65
monroe

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jaclaz ... thanks for posting the earlier links, I missed them earlier today, you and Charlotte post so much information all over the place, it's easy to miss something ... the article: "Computer Virus Hits U.S. Drone Fleet" is amazing.

 

"The virus, first detected nearly two weeks ago by the military’s Host-Based Security System ... But the virus has resisted multiple efforts to remove it from Creech’s computers, network security specialists say. And the infection underscores the ongoing security risks in what has become the U.S. military’s most important weapons system.

 

“We keep wiping it off, and it keeps coming back,” says a source familiar with the network infection, one of three that told Danger Room about the virus. “We think it’s benign. But we just don’t know.”

 

Military network security specialists aren’t sure whether the virus and its so-called “keylogger” payload were introduced intentionally or by accident; it may be a common piece of malware that just happened to make its way into these sensitive networks. The specialists don’t know exactly how far the virus has spread. But they’re sure that the infection has hit both classified and unclassified machines at Creech. That raises the possibility, at least, that secret data may have been captured by the keylogger, and then transmitted over the public internet to someone outside the military chain of command."

 

and this also about encryption ... "But despite their widespread use, the drone systems are known to have security flaws. Many Reapers and Predators don’t encrypt the video they transmit to American troops on the ground. In the summer of 2009, U.S. forces discovered “days and days and hours and hours” of the drone footage on the laptops of Iraqi insurgents. A $26 piece of software allowed the militants to capture the video".

 

I noticed the article is dated 2011 ... hopefully the virus is gone and they have encryption in place.

 

and XP in use at Mission Control ... "Windows XP = Mission Critical Software". Well, if XP is good enough for Mission Control, well there you have it ... except that there doesn't seem to be too many rocket launches anymore !!! ... onward to the stars and asteroids with XP in my little rocket ship.

...


Edited by duffy98, 16 August 2013 - 03:08 PM.


#66
jaclaz

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jaclaz ... thanks for posting the earlier links, ..

Check also what was published will be published in 2017:

http://www.msfn.org/...83-experts-say/

 

;)

 

jaclaz



#67
dencorso

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Check also what was published will be published in 2017: http://www.msfn.org/...83-experts-say/  ;)


"There are many vulnerabilities in Firefox," our IT analyst was told. "They have not been discovered yet and there is no proof to any of them, but this is no reason to feel complacent."


roll1.gif

#68
Dogway

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Yes, no April 2014 or whatever, XP died with the new Haswell targeted motherboards, not to manufacturer fault's but mostly Intel for its Intel parts (Audio, LAN, SATA, etc) lacking XP drivers. Intel is, just after Microsoft the one encouraging this position.

 

This is only a personal cry out when I found out after months (4 months!) of being decided to get a new Haswell CPU and after these recent days when refining my mobo choices that to my surprise I got to know that the new ones are not XP compatible, WTF? Couldn't they just wait for the next year when XP becomes officially unsupported? are they in a hurry or what? I'm very disappointed because I had on mind to set up a DUAL BOOT with W7 to make the transition the least traumatic experience possible.

 

I really don't know what to do, I'm surprised that after all these months reading here and there for building my rig nobody made this claim. XP is now officially outdated (only useable with old hardware), and this really pushed me to consider on building my new rig around a z77 based mobo.

 

I have been also said that XP and boards with UEFI isn't recommended. What's wrong with it?


Edited by Dogway, 29 August 2013 - 11:01 PM.


#69
MrJinje

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I wonder when people will start writing new drivers for XP. 


Edited by MrJinje, 29 August 2013 - 11:26 PM.


#70
CharlotteTheHarlot

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If you want to really make a difference here is what you can do.

Call or write letters ( not email ) to all the involved parties. Gigabyte, Asus, MSI, AMD, Intel ( ... etc ). Tell them to continue supplying drivers for Windows XP and 2003 ( aka Windows 5.1 and 5.2 ) and NOT just Vista, 7, 8, 8.1 ( aka Windows 6.0, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3 ).

Remind them that Windows XP accounts for fully 1/3 of all Windows installations. Here's some telemetry they can chew on: If they total up all of Vista and Windows 8 computers and then multiply it by four it is still less than Windows XP. Economically it makes no sense to support Vista or Windows 8. How would their shareholders feel about this sort of fiscal mismanagement?

Also mention that by following Microsoft's will they are complicit in their cynical planned obsolescence, willing co-conspirators with a convicted monopolist to obsolete perfectly working current hardware and future hardware. Tell them that you will be contacting your government representatives and asking them to once again punish Microsoft for predatory and monopolistic practices and will be suggesting that all collaborators should also be investigated and punished.

They play hardball in their backroom deals, it is time for the customers to do the same.

EDIT: typo

Edited by CharlotteTheHarlot, 30 August 2013 - 12:36 AM.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...


#71
Dogway

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I wonder when people will start writing new drivers for XP. 

I really don't see it. I made a quick google, and couldn't find anything serious, there are some sporadic and niche modded drivers for certain cards, etc. But I don't see a whole mobo (well actually the Intel stuff which is practically most of it) being supported by modded drivers. I hope to be wrong but... for now is more words than anything IMHO.

 

@CharlotteTheHarlot: I know it will be futile but I was really thinking on sending a complain email to Intel. I'm "one more" annoyed customer that I expect to sum for a great number if many of us do the same.

Really, what was their claim for dropping support all of sudden, did they say something on that? I mean what was the idea behind it? 1/3 of computers still use XP, and the OS is one year away from being unsupported by microsoft, what's the point of dropping support this year and not next, it doesn't make sense.



#72
Mijzelf

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Really, what was their claim for dropping support all of sudden, did they say something on that? I mean what was the idea behind it? 1/3 of computers still use XP, and the OS is one year away from being unsupported by microsoft, what's the point of dropping support this year and not next, it doesn't make sense.


It's not dropping support, it's 'not adding' support. For those new chipsets new drivers were needed. Most new chipsets are shipped in new computers, most new computers are shipped with a new OS.
So I guess Intel didn't think it is profitable to write XP drivers for the few people who put a new mobo in an old computer, or who install an old OS on a new computer.

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Economically it makes no sense to support Vista or Windows 8. How would their shareholders feel about this sort of fiscal mismanagement?

 

I'm sure AMD would love you to take care of Intel's shareholders. :angel



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CharlotteTheHarlot

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Economically it makes no sense to support Vista or Windows 8. How would their shareholders feel about this sort of fiscal mismanagement?

 
I'm sure AMD would love you to take care of Intel's shareholders. :angel


Not sure what you mean. Anyway I was just inverting the prevailing logic to expose the hypocrisy, because we always hear how it is expensive to develop drivers for an old Operating System and other such bullcrap.

From a pure demographic point of view, Vista and Windows 8 should be avoided at all costs by all hardware makers and software developers ...
 

sd3Bxwn.jpg

Vista 4.24% + Win8 5.4% = 9.64% x 4 = 38.56%. Windows XP usage is four times greater than Vista and Win8 combined!


That's for July ( August 2013 report ), in a mere 24 hours we should have August numbers ( September 1 report ) and naturally it will look much the same.

It is certain that if the numbers were reversed, ( i.e., WinXP at 4-5% ) both Microsoft and all her sycophants would be trumpeting this as reason number one to stop developing for it. Therefore it makes sense that with the current numbers they should be making an effort to "support" WinXP, anything else would be detrimental to the company according to every sane business strategy.

But you bring up a great point about AMD that I hadn't thought of. Letters wriiten to AMD should suggest they continue to release chipset drivers for Windows XP since Intel has abandoned 1/3 of the market. Play them against each other  :yes: AMD is nothing if not open to a surefire win in their endless battle with Intel. Letters to Intel should mention this dropping of XP as a clear opening for AMD and they should continue "supporting" Windows XP at the chipset level or else AMD will step in.

Recall how the news of potential future soldered CPU's got the "enthusiasts" in an uproar and AMD quickly responded by remaining committed to socketed processors. A day or two later Intel did the same, probably out of peer pressure.

I like this strategy. All we need to do is get one of the chipset producers onboard and the other will follow. Thanks Ponch for the great idea.  :thumbup

EDIT: spacing, typos

Edited by CharlotteTheHarlot, 31 August 2013 - 01:53 PM.

... Let him who hath understanding reckon the Number Of The Beast ...





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