LeaflameSD

Why you should avoid buying Windows 8

150 posts in this topic

I also had wanted something more out of Microsoft Bob. The strange thing about it is that it is designed to appear like a point and click adventure game. I knew it wasn't a game but I was always interested in the concept of it. I had no use for such a program as a kid as I didn't know anything about checkbooks or whatever else you could do in there. It probably made things more confusing for people than it needed to be. I'd expect that adults didn't like it because it looked too much like a game, and kids didn't like it because it looked like a game but wasn't.

I wonder how things would have turned out if Microsoft Bob had been MSFT's next official OS after, say, Windows 95. Not as an add-on, but built into the PC as the primary interface, just like Metro in Win8.

--JorgeA

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P.S. (and OT): Looking at your signature, in 2012 how could someone try out those Longhorn builds?

vmware 6.5 :P (not 6.05 but 6.5)

OK, but how does one go about getting a hold of Longhorn builds 3718, 4029, or 4066 today, in 2012?

--JorgeA

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I wonder how things would have turned out if Microsoft Bob had been MSFT's next official OS after, say, Windows 95. Not as an add-on, but built into the PC as the primary interface, just like Metro in Win8.

It would be interesting indeed. I'd just think we'd see some other window manager surface to relevance for professional use without the toy'ish appearance. Still remember as a teenager when Win95 came up, that thing just looked hypnotizing and modern when compared to other options such as DOS and Win 3.x.

I wonder if teenagers are indeed feeling the same "wow" experience with Win8 nowadays.

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As a matter of fact I wasn't at the time that much impressed by the Start button of Windows 95/NT4.

I came (like everyone else) from Windows 3.11, but I had on most machines Norton Desktop that provided a nice "mac like" kind of interface to it.

What I remember as "astounding" was when i first installed (from floppies!) a Windows 95 Beta were the graphics of the installer, can you remember those bluish images that flickered on your screen at night hinting hidden future marvels such as the MS ergonomic keyboard, CD's and strange new cables, with the buzzing of the floppy drive accessing sectors chanting a lullaby in the background .... :rolleyes:

Windows_95_NT_4_Setup_Logo_by_DOS_Commander.jpg

of course, as often happens, things that happened when you were some twenty years younger tend to have an augmented aura of mystics when remembered....

jaclaz

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I loved Win95 OSR-2! In MS-DOS 6.22 or Win 3.11 I used Norton Commander to do my job and later on was DOS Navigator. I didn't like the Win 3.11 interface, but when I installed Windows 95 OSR-2 for the first time I was so freakin' excited about the look. I loved it!

For me, Win8 is just Win 3.11 on LCD display, that's it, nothing more.

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I wonder how things would have turned out if Microsoft Bob had been MSFT's next official OS after, say, Windows 95. Not as an add-on, but built into the PC as the primary interface, just like Metro in Win8.

It would be interesting indeed. I'd just think we'd see some other window manager surface to relevance for professional use without the toy'ish appearance. Still remember as a teenager when Win95 came up, that thing just looked hypnotizing and modern when compared to other options such as DOS and Win 3.x.

I wonder if teenagers are indeed feeling the same "wow" experience with Win8 nowadays.

I'm not sure if we will ever experience those days anymore. Computers are a lot more accessible and a way of life than it was say in the early 90s. Nearly everyone (here in the US) has a computer of some sort. Back in the early 90s, not everyone had computers and I recall that not even all schools had computers in them. It seems to me that computing even in the early 90s carried over a lot of the hobbyist feeling to it from the 80s. If I were a kid nowadays, I probably wouldn't see a computer as being some rare mystery machine that I wanted to learn more about, simply because they are everywhere and are no mystery.

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I didn't like the Win 3.11 interface, but when I installed Windows 95 OSR-2 for the first time I was so freakin' excited about the look. I loved it!

For me, Win8 is just Win 3.11 on LCD display, that's it, nothing more.

same for me. I never liked 3.11 and was so excited about Win95 :thumbup

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people need to stop complaining cause they dont know how to use windows 8 new features and design. if you dont like to try new things then go back to XP !

People need to stop assuming that everybody who doesn't like Metro can't figure out how to use it.
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I think it's by far the worst version not only of Windows, but of all their operating systems since MS DOS 3.x at least. It even makes Vista seem like a nice upgrade. If MS continues in that direction they're going to find themselves in big trouble pretty quickly.

We're all in trouble if this rumor proves true ...

Intel’s Haswell Could Be Last Interchangeable Desktop Microprocessors - Report. ( Xbit Labs 2012-11-22 )

Intel's Haswell May Be Last Interchangeable Desktop CPU? ( Tom's Hardware 2012-11-27 )

Intel to kill off desktop as we know it, reports claim ( CNet 2012-11-27 )

Intel's Broadwell Goes BGA Only: Implications for Future Desktops ( PC Perspective 2012-11-27 )

Could Intel kill off the removable CPU? ( NeoWin 2012-11-28 )

If the news proves true, this will have a huge impact on the PC industry, especially the DIY upgrade market. Users of mainstream desktops won't be able to manually swap out one processor for another if the original CPU fails or the user wants to upgrade. Instead, mainstream consumers will be stuck with whatever they bought, forced to upgrade the entire desktop at a higher price.

Xbit labs points out that because the Intel chips will be soldered into the motherboards, OEMs will be required to stockpile a large number of different mainboards with various features and dissimilar processors just to provide adequate choices for customers. This not only increases business risks for smaller desktop makers, but decreases the ability for motherboard manufacturers to differentiate themselves from their rivals.

What this means is that we have maybe one more tick-tock cycle and then it is all over. Done. Both halves of the Wintel duopoly will have successfully destroyed the home PC in their quest chasing after the fickle consumerist sales model. As I mentioned a while back, this happens in industry when the suits care more about Wall Street than Main Street and decide to go for the quick buck and quantity over quality. Rapid adoption of cheap digital cameras, LCD displays, etc, completely destroyed existing technologies even if they were equal or superior. We may have dodged a bullet with SSDs not wiping out HDDs ( well not yet ). But this trend is all around us. Apple lives in this universe and exploits it, Microsoft envies it.

IMHO this paradigm, catering to the lowest common denominator is at the root of much of the criticism of Windows 8, at least with me. We know when we see the move from quality to McDonalds mass consumerism. Nothing short of full and utterly thorough failure of Windows 8 and the complete sacking of their management and board of directors will slow this computer devolution. Unfortunately if Intel is getting onboard, even a normal Windows release will not matter.

EDIT: more links

EDIT2: update below at Post #129.

Edited by CharlotteTheHarlot
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As a matter of fact I wasn't at the time that much impressed by the Start button of Windows 95/NT4.

How about that. My reaction when I first understood the Start Button was very different -- I remember thinking, "Wow, this Windows thing is starting to make sense now!!" Up until then, I didn't think that Windows (3.x) was any real improvement over MS-DOS, I tended to view it as just an added layer of crud and complexity. To my mind, the Start Button + Taskbar made a world of difference in terms of usability.

--JorgeA

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I am just so sad about where this whole thing is headed. Dumb consumers have no sense of quality and don't see the poor quality of the Windows 8 OS. They just want to run Apps. For them it's just a platform to run their Apps. And there is no other company in a leadership position to deliver quality OSes that advance computing. Whatever company tries to do their own commercial well-developed OS, Microsoft and Apple will drive them out of business with their patent lawsuits. American evil tech corporations suck for not delivering quality products in the constant money-sucking short life cycles. :(

Edited by xpclient
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well, such american corporations indeed addicted to 'Planned Obsolescene'.

Whenever possible, they want the life cycles to be as short as possible.

Edited by Joseph_sw
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I am just so sad about where this hold thing is headed. Dumb consumers have no sense of quality and don't see the poor quality of the Windows 8 OS. They just want to run Apps. For them it's just a platform to run their Apps. And there is no other company in a leadership position to deliver quality OSes that advance computing. Whatever company tries to do their own commercial well-developed OS, Microsoft and Apple will drive them out of business with their patent lawsuits. American evil tech corporations suck for not delivering quality products in the constant money-sucking short life cycles. :(

I'm slightly more hopeful than you. I think that there will always be a market for regular desktop PCs and the more-serious applications (not "apps"!) that they offer. The kind of PCs that you and I use may eventually be redesignated as "high-end devices," but as long as there are enough people out there who want to buy them, there'll be somebody willing to sell them.

If Microsoft gets bad enough and Apple no better, there's always Linux. If Windows continues on its current path to cretinization, I wouldn't be surprised to start seeing commercial PCs coming out with some user-friendly flavor of Linux preinstalled, and developers getting serious about putting out serious Linux-based alternatives to things like MS Office. (I've tried LibreOffice, and sorry to say it doesn't hold a candle to MS Office.)

That said, the Linux folks will really have to get off this model of issuing a new OS every six or twelve months, then supporting each edition for a couple of years at best. It's not money-sucking, instead it's time-sucking. I'm not into reinstalling every d*mn thing on my PC every few months just to stay current. :angry: That's definitely one area where Microsoft runs circles around the Linux community.

--JorgeA

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My main distro is linux and you'll get a technical support for 5 years just keep it updated as you do with windows.No reinstalling ever 6 M unless you just want to.

I also Have windows 8 on a drive ! What I find is a matter of preference . I do everthing with linux I can do with windows.

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