Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

MSFN is made available via donations, subscriptions and advertising revenue. The use of ad-blocking software hurts the site. Please disable ad-blocking software or set an exception for MSFN. Alternatively, register and become a site sponsor/subscriber and ads will be disabled automatically. 



Sign in to follow this  
Phaenius

Capped (clipped, whatever) sound with Audigy sound card

Recommended Posts

Phaenius    0

I can't rule out the sound card, since it sounds bad via headphones, unless all headphones are faulty (quite unlikely). Besides, what can go wrong inside a headphones set ? They only have basically 2 electric devices, 2 coils. Passive components. They can either have a mechanical failure (coil rubbing the magnets or membrane broken) or a wire failure due to excessive heat melting the isolation or simply discontinuity. Not the case. Why do I say it sounds better via receiver and passive speakers ? Because somehow they tend to "enhance" the sound somehow, both receiver and active speakers have all sorts of filters, EQs and so on, a set of headphones doesn't have. Plus, headphones are connected in close vicinity of your ears, you spot faults easier.

I didn't test the receiver extensively at all sounds and levels and sources, because so far, I didn't have to. When I bought the card, I plugged it into computer, connected the headphones on front panel, it worked fine, then connected the sound card to receiver and I used headphones on receiver, it sounded even better, perfect (to my likening) I should say. Then I moved and unpacked the computer at first, without receiver, passive speakers (which are big and heavy) and other big devices and decided to use the front panel sound headphones plug on the sound card for a while. Result was bad, somehow, during my listening via receiver, sound card went bad (and I failed to notice). Or perhaps during the moving of computer. So, I stopped using receiver and passive speakers to avoid inflicting damage to it. I bought this set of active speakers and connected to the coaxial output.

I know the thread title is about "capping", but I am more concerned at the moment about the general sound I am getting via headphones, more than capping. I am sure the active speakers were faulty when I bought them, with this limitation of sound somewhere. If the capping is happening inside the active speakers, at least one problem is solved. Maybe they simply fail to supply the amplifier with enough current to withstand "heavy" passages of music, I really don't know.

Not three sets of headphones, 5 sets, Sennheiser, AKG, Philips, Samsung and Sony.

But let us wait until I will clean the card and try to do the best I can in replacing ribbon cable, moving to another slot, whatever I can and report the results. It is clear as it stands, nothing can be done without a direct action to sound card. I would have LOVED to have (and/or to know how to use it) a software program that could detect imperfections in DACs or analogue amplifiers. Something like generating some predefined sounds and prompting me to watch some sine waves on a software oscilloscope and notice if the visual waves stay within normal limits. I am fearful the card may have a voltage leakage somewhere that mixes with the "correct" sound.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jaclaz    943

I would have LOVED to have (and/or to know how to use it) a software program that could detect imperfections in DACs or analogue amplifiers. Something like generating some predefined sounds and prompting me to watch some sine waves on a software oscilloscope and notice if the visual waves stay within normal limits. I am fearful the card may have a voltage leakage somewhere that mixes with the "correct" sound.

You were actually provided with some, but again having a software and learning HOW to use it, are two separate steps, the first one can be easily reached through "third party action" (the given suggestions) the latter only by your time and will (and curiosity).

jaclaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jaclaz    943

It implies you already know what to do.

....or that you learn about how to do it.... :whistle:

I mean, it's not brain surgery, nor rocket science .... :no:

jaclaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bphlpt    104
When I bought the card, I plugged it into computer, connected the headphones on front panel, it worked fine, then connected the sound card to receiver and I used headphones on receiver, it sounded even better, perfect (to my likening) I should say. Then I moved and unpacked the computer at first, without receiver, passive speakers (which are big and heavy) and other big devices and decided to use the front panel sound headphones plug on the sound card for a while. Result was bad, somehow, during my listening via receiver, sound card went bad (and I failed to notice). Or perhaps during the moving of computer. So, I stopped using receiver and passive speakers to avoid inflicting damage to it. I bought this set of active speakers and connected to the coaxial output.

I don't think I had seen this info before (moving). :) When you clean the entire computer, not just the sound card, but everything in the entire hardware chain from motherboard all the way to the speakers, be very attentive and careful when you put everything back together to make sure that all connections are straight, snug, and clean, absolutely nothing is touching anything else that it shouldn't, etc. The moving brings up the possibility of a mechanical event that could have caused the electrical problem that is evidenced in your aural symptom.

Cheers and Regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phaenius    0

Yes, but weird, isn't it, ONLY to audio ? Everything else works peachy.

I avoided mentioning the moving because first I don't think it is of much importance and second, I was SURE you would blame that. :D

Edited by Phaenius

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
submix8c    89

:lol:

NOW you see what we've all been going through - "dis-and/or-mis-and/or-lackof-information"...

"Move that good connection to the Monitor Amp, would you? O crap! It's making NOISE now!"

I rest my case Your Honor!

(edit to fix descriptive example)

Edited by submix8c

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bphlpt    104

Yes, but weird, isn't it, ONLY to audio ? Everything else works peachy.

I avoided mentioning the moving because first I don't think it is of much importance and second, I was SURE you would blame that. :D

Maybe weird, but you have no proof that it's not to blame. And I don't like to believe in coincidence.

Cheers and Regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phaenius    0

It's a long shot. Moving the car from one place to another each day can cause disruptions in the electrical systems ? Not to mention cars suffer heavy exploits, like weather changing and mechanical shocks. I didn't said it didn't happened, but it has a low to zero probability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bphlpt    104

The difference is that the car is made to move, made to withstand the environment, made to withstand the mechanical shocks, etc, and even then movement does cause parts of the car to fail as well, whereas the desktop computer is not made to move by any stretch of the imagination. I don't care who built it, not even me. Assuming you were very careful in the move, I think the odds are more probably in the low to mid range. Depending on the bumps it encountered it could be above mid, but there is no way in h*ll it is near zero. There are just too many interconnected pieces in your system that are not solidly locked together and incapable of any movement. or having something bump up against something else, etc. Also, from what you describe above, you noticed the problems suddenly, right after the move, not gradually as you said earlier. It's just too coincidental. But I tell you what. I won't speculate anymore if you won't either. Otherwise I might start yelling like submix8c, or just ignore you. :) Just tell me what you find after you clean and reassemble everything, and I mean everything, the computer and the entire hardware chain, and retest. Then we'll talk again.

Cheers and Regards

Edited by bphlpt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jaclaz    943

It's a long shot. Moving the car from one place to another each day can cause disruptions in the electrical systems ? Not to mention cars suffer heavy exploits, like weather changing and mechanical shocks. I didn't said it didn't happened, but it has a low to zero probability.

This is one of the advantages of Italian.

A car is related to the concept of mobilità=mobility.

A house is related to the the concept of immobiliare=real estate.

Cars are made to move, houses are made to stay where they are :yes:.

Relative accessories tend to be the same.

JFYI, a very common issue since the advent of SATA disks is that their senseless (theoretically 50 insertions worth :w00t: ) connector will often disconnect when moving.

The issue is so serious that most OEM's have one way or the other to "fix" the connector to allow safely shipping to the end customer.

For the record, old ISA cards had a very similar tendency.

jaclaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phaenius    0

bphlpt, I noticed problems suddenly, because I started using the sound card's headphones output suddenly. Otherwise, I might have not noticed it.

jaclaz, I don't know what you are talking about SATA and ISA and insertions. I kept the computer suspended in mid air while moving, using my Jedi powers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bphlpt    104
bphlpt, I noticed problems suddenly, because I started using the sound card's headphones output suddenly. Otherwise, I might have not noticed it.

So you have no way of knowing whether it was actually gradual or sudden. I guess you'll believe what you want and I'll do the same. Let me know what happens after the cleaning.

Cheers and Regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bphlpt    104

Pretty much what we've all been saying all along, but now with a very possible reason as to why/how. It could be that something, board, cable, whatever, is ever so slightly loose causing a poor connection. Or a small piece of something got into a connection point causing interference, short, and/or signal degradation. Stress of movement caused a cable to fail or weaken internally. Movement caused torque which strained a connector or connection causing an iffy signal path. Movement caused something conductive to touch something it shouldn't, and it still is. If one of the various boards involved is damaged, it could have been caused by this same mechanism or by the mechanical stress of the collision. While any electrical component can fail on its own for various reasons, the likelihood of damage increases exponentially when electrical and/or mechanical stress is applied. Look, I really don't want to speculate anymore and I don't want you to either. I'll talk to you again after you do "the job", and I'm serious about doing everything, the computer and the entire hardware chain. I'm done until then.

Cheers and Regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×