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Falcor

objShell.Run issues...

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Geej    0

Since David Wang post caption is "HOWTO: Detect Process Bitness"

and bphlpt also quoted from his post it is "The logic that I use from a program to detect whether the OS is 32bit or 64bit looks like this:"

So here we have a conflict of information from his post.

However, MSDN post is that PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432 is an environment variable use in 'WOW64 Implementation Details (Windows)'

Here is another quote ss64.com where he quoted David Wang post too. (But look at the title: it is 32 bit or 64 bit process detection)

Hence the batch file is really a process bitness check, not OS bitness.

Just to lighten this discussion, MS also provide an article how to determine whether a computer is running a 32-bit version or 64-bit version of the Windows operating system.

The best part of it is in the 'Next Steps'. (Call support if unsure, LOL)

Regards

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Truthfully I was expecting the AMD64 to be returned.

I added a couple more line to get CPU ID and X6432, I was expecting that my CPU ID would be the same'.

post-5386-0-16388000-1362528778_thumb.pnpost-5386-0-56879500-1362528788_thumb.pn

I also tested on my x64 adding Wscript.Path, my Scripting App is 32 bit

post-5386-0-52671100-1362529417_thumb.pn

X6432 this variable the only constant thing about it is value of Nothing, so it totally useless in a VBS environment.

Here is a full list of Technet Environment Variables

Here is my theory on a 32 bit OS the CPU is in x86 mode any will not run any 64 bit apps, on 64 bit OS you are running

in x64 bit mode period. Individual process can exists in either 32 or 64 bit architecture on 64 bit OS.

I would like to see someone install a x86 Os on to a x64 CPU and keep it at 64 bit and have more than 4 Gb of ram. This

does not include using any type of virtual machine

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bphlpt    104
Here is my theory on a 32 bit OS the CPU is in x86 mode any will not run any 64 bit apps, on 64 bit OS you are running

in x64 bit mode period. Individual process can exists in either 32 or 64 bit architecture on 64 bit OS.

EXACTLY!!!

Cheers and Regards

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bphlpt    104

...

So here we have a conflict of information from his post.

...

Hence the batch file is really a process bitness check, not OS bitness.

...

Just to lighten this discussion, MS also provide an article how to determine whether a computer is running a 32-bit version or 64-bit version of the Windows operating system.

The best part of it is in the 'Next Steps'. (Call support if unsure, LOL)

I appreciate you trying to lighten the mood. But I don't think there is a conflict of information in David Wang's blog. I'll stand by what was as posted as the "heading" of the code snippet itself. The result of the code snippet indicates the OS bitness. The value of %PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE% by itself is an indicator of process bitness..

Cheers and Regards

Edited by bphlpt

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1:\ PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE is more than enough to determine if the OS is x86 or x64

2:\ W6432 does not work in VBS, any code posted in Cmd I tried always got more? on every line

3:\ PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE is not enough to determine if a individual process is x86 or x64

4:\ There Win32_Processor that has a way to determine OS Bitness, AddressWidth

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bphlpt    104

Since you insist on proof:

osbitness.jpg

I made a very simple html file with the following (Don't laugh, I'm not much of a script or HTML coder):


<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script language="javascript">
function myFunction()
{
var wshell = new ActiveXObject("WScript.Shell");
proc_arch = wshell.ExpandEnvironmentStrings("%PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE%");
proc_arch6432 = wshell.ExpandEnvironmentStrings("%PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432%");
alert("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE=["+proc_arch+"]\nPROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432=["+proc_arch6432+"]");
}
</script>
</head>
<body>

<input type="button" onclick="myFunction()" value="Show bitness">

</body>
</html>

Here is the relevant info from System Information:


OS Name Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate
Version 6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601
System Type x64-based PC
Processor AMD TX(tm)-6100 Six-Core Processor, 3300 MHz, 3 Core(s), 6 Logical Processor(s)
Installes Physical Memory (RAM) 16.0 GB

In the image above:

* On the top is shown the code (test.html)

* On the bottom left is an instance of 32-bit IE9 v9.0.8112.16421 - Update Versions: 9.0.13 (KB2792100)

* On the bottom right is an instance of 64-bit IE9 v9.0.8112.16421 64-bit Edition - Update Versions: 9.0.13 (KB2792100)

I opened the exact same test.html code in a window of each browser. As you can see:

In the 32-bit browser:

%PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE% = x86

%PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432% = AMD64

In the 64-bit browser:

%PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE% = AMD64

%PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432% = %PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432% [meaning it's value is undefined]

So, to address your previous conclusions,

1:\ PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE is more than enough to determine if the OS is x86 or x64 -- FALSE

2:\ W6432 does not work in VBS, any code posted in Cmd I tried always got more? on every line -- It works fine in Javascript, surely there is a way in VBS, unless maybe VBS always runs in 64-bit mode if possible?

3:\ PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE is not enough to determine if a individual process is x86 or x64 -- FALSE, or it sure seems like that to me

4:\ There Win32_Processor that has a way to determine OS Bitness, AddressWidth -- From what you've shown me I can't argue with that.

I never said there weren't other ways to determine OS bitness. But you kept saying "my" way was wrong, wouldn't work, and wasn't necessary. I hope I've proven my point. If not, I really don't know what else you want as proof.

Cheers and Regards

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Geej    0

bphlpt is right in David Wang's case. I realise I got it wrong.

Base on bphlpt's post #10 detection logic and also Yzöwl's post #18 batch logic,

and using GSM post #11 code but slighly modify, I think the vbscript should look like this:

Dim Act :Set Act = CreateObject("Wscript.Shell") 
Dim SysVar : Set SysVar = Act.Environment("System")
If SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE") = "AMD64" OR SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432") = "AMD64" Then
WScript.Echo "x64 OS bit"
else
WScript.Echo "x32 OS bit"
End if

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1:\ Wow trying to put words into my mouth. :rolleyes: Please show me anywhere in this thread where I used the code you

posted, and said the results are always correct. :w00t:

2;\

Dim Act :Set Act = CreateObject("Wscript.Shell")
Dim SysVar : Set SysVar = Act.Environment("System")

Now lets get this correct when I mention PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE it in the above context. Show me anywhere in this

thread where I posted second rated code that you produced for your test and got the correct results, they are correct you just

do not understand the context. Do you know what environment ExpandEnvironmentStrings access?

ExpandEnvironmentStrings Method

You shown you don't read my links here a bit about what is access.

The ExpandEnvironmentStrings method expands environment variables defined in the PROCESS environment space only.

3:\ Perhaps if you had taken the time to read my link to the Environment Variables .You could of scripted something like below

and show that if you used Process will return your results in the HTA that you produced.


Dim Act :Set Act = CreateObject("Wscript.Shell")
Dim SysVar : Set SysVar = Act.Environment("System")
'Dim SysVar : Set SysVar = Act.Environment("Process")
If Right(SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE"),2) = "64" Then
WScript.Echo "64 Bit Os " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE") & _
vbCrLf & "CPU ID " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER") & _
vbCrLf & "W6432 " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432") & _
vbCrLf & WScript.Path
Else
WScript.Echo "32 Bit Os " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE") & _
vbCrLf & "CPU ID " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER") & _
vbCrLf & "W6432 " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432")& vbCrLf & WScript.Path
End If

Instead you go way out of context post something that I have not reference and using innuendo that I was at fault and wrong.

Again show me where I used ExpandEnvironmentStrings in this thread and say it results are correct.

Using the above code I tested on x86 and x64 OS and it always return the correct results, see if you can produce your results

using my script and using System. I tried on 2 different OS and got always the correct results.

Just for fun I made some minor changes check the results.


Dim Act :Set Act = CreateObject("Wscript.Shell")
Dim SysVar : Set SysVar = Act.Environment("System")
'Dim SysVar : Set SysVar = Act.Environment("Process")
Dim A
If Right(SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE"),2) = "64" Then
A = "64 Bit Os " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE") & _
vbCrLf & "CPU ID " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER") & _
vbCrLf & "W6432 " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432") & _
vbCrLf & WScript.Path
Else
A = "32 Bit Os " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE") & _
vbCrLf & "CPU ID " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER") & _
vbCrLf & "W6432 " & vbTab & SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432")& vbCrLf & WScript.Path
End If
WScript.Echo A & vbcrlf & _
"Test W6432 : " & Act.ExpandEnvironmentStrings("%PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432%")

Results x86 app x64 OS

post-5386-0-66840200-1362634142_thumb.pn

You can see I am getting the correct results using my scripting app output, you W6432 = AMD64

and Wscript Script Host W6432 = %PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432% and each show 64 Bit Os AMD64.



var Act = new ActiveXObject("WScript.Shell");
var Env = Act.Environment("System")
var a, b ="Test W6432\t" + Act.ExpandEnvironmentStrings("%PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432%")
var A = new Array(Env("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE"),"CPU ID \t"+
Env("PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER"),"W6432 \t"+Env("PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432"),
"App Path \t"+WScript.Path)
function MyTest(a){if(Right(A[0],2) == "64")
{a ="64 Bit Os \t"+A[0]+"\n\r"+A[1]+"\n\r"+A[2]+"\n\r"+ A[3]+"\n\r"}
else
{a ="32 Bit Os \t"+A[0]+"\n\r"+A[1]+"\n\r"+A[2]+"\n\r"+ A[3]+"\n\r"}
return a + b}
function Right(str, N){return str.substring(str.length, str.length - N);}
WScript.Echo(MyTest(a))

Same script in Jscript returns the same results

post-5386-0-70101600-1362634215_thumb.pn

Now in these two scripts it really proves one thing and that is how wrong you are.

bphlpt is right in David Wang's case. I realise I got it wrong.

Base on bphlpt's post #10 detection logic and also Yzöwl's post #18 batch logic,

and using GSM post #11 code but slighly modify, I think the vbscript should look like this:

Dim Act :Set Act = CreateObject("Wscript.Shell") 
Dim SysVar : Set SysVar = Act.Environment("System")
If SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE") = "AMD64" OR SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432") = "AMD64" Then
WScript.Echo "x64 OS bit"
else
WScript.Echo "x32 OS bit"
End if

Not really the SysVar("PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432") return nothing in either script

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bphlpt    104

I think I realize now that GSM and I have been talking about slightly different things. He is the scripting master after all, as my poor attempts show with my "second rated code", while I come more from a CMD batch scripting background. It seems that he is able to take advantage of abilities via VBScript or Jscript that I did not realize you could do. I did not realize that you could get the value of an Environment Variable at the SYSTEM level, no matter what process you currently were in, if I understand things correctly. This is a completely foreign concept of course to a CMD batch script programmer who only has access to one %PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE% variable, for example, the one for the process that he is in. Even after reading his referenced links I still had to reread them a couple of times, stare at his code for a while, and work it through. I'm still learning and I guess that was the new thing I was meant to learn today.

So while I stand by the detection logic I posted in post #10, or Yzöwl's post #18, or Geej's post #37 as the safest logic to use for any script language, (CMD batch, VBScript, or JScript), that is able to run from any process on any Windows OS, (at least XP+), and accurately determine the OS bitness, I also agree that if you are indeed able to to read the Environment Variables at the SYSTEM level, then %PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE% alone seems to be just as accurate to determine OS bitness. In this regard GSM was right and I was wrong. I humbly ask his forgiveness for doubting him and I hope we are still friends with no hard feelings.

Cheers and Regards

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bphlpt any Cmd prompt code must of been correct or Yzöwl would of said something

Your hta was correct, retrieving the correct information, it just in VBS JS Environments there more information to

access than Cmd, that where the confusion sets in. As you see there are a couple of Environments, and I have not

tested them all and only these two Process and System and they return different results depending on what

Environments it was being processed by. See you, learned something new from all this.

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Geej    0

Sorry if my code is wrong.

I was just trying to relate the cmd logic directly into vbscript when I look harder at the cmd code.

Seems like Obj.AddressWidth method is much easier in vbscript. (in Post #20)

vbscript is not something I look or consider scripting as my first choice of language, also there are always so much to learn...

Cheers

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bphlpt    104

I guess this will show how both GSM and I can get the same result with different methods:

osbitness2.jpg

Same arrangement as last time. My revised "second rated code" :):


<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script language="javascript">
function myFunction()
{
var Act = new ActiveXObject("WScript.Shell");
var proc_archP = Act.ExpandEnvironmentStrings("%PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE%");
var proc_arch6432P = Act.ExpandEnvironmentStrings("%PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432%");
var SEnv = Act.Environment("System");
var proc_archS = SEnv("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE");
var proc_arch6432S = SEnv("PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432");
alert("Process\nPROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE=["+proc_archP+"]\nPROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432=["+proc_arch6432P+"]\n\nSystem\nPROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE=["+proc_archS+"]\nPROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432=["+proc_arch6432S+"]");
}
</script>
</head>
<body>

<input type="button" onclick="myFunction()" value="Show bitness">

</body>
</html>

Note that now I get the values of %PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE% and %PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432% at both the process and the system level.

32-bit IE9 is still on the bottom left and 64-bit IE9 is still on the bottom right.

So to get the OS bitness you can use the same logic that I have advocated all along, testing the values of both %PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE% and %PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432%, using either the process or the system level variables will give the same result, or you can just check the value of only the SYSTEM %PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE%, if you are smart enough to know that you can do that. AFAIK, you can't do the latter via CMD batch script.

Geej, I don't think the code you posted in post #37 is "wrong". I think it will work correctly, it's just that since you were testing the SYSTEM level variables, you really didn't need to test them both. Testing only %PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE% should give the same result.

Cheers and Regards

Edited by bphlpt

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Yzöwl    30
Seems like Obj.AddressWidth method is much easier in vbscript. (in Post #20)

vbscript is not something I look or consider scripting as my first choice of language, also there are always so much to learn...

How difficult is the single line batch/comand using WMIC I posted in post 21?

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It not second rated now you are using the correct object for the tasks. You could use ExpandEnvironmentStrings to

get the w6432, it uses the process environment. My only critique is instead of alert it might of been nicer to have

it display the information in the HTA.

Example

<!-- Hta And Script By Gunsmokingman Aka Jake1Eye This code is property of Gunsmokingman and Or Jake1Eye and you must have his permission to use. This is only posted as example code and meant only to used as such.--><TITLE>Test</TITLE><STYLE type="text/css">Body{Padding-Top:5pt;Padding-Bottom:1pt;Margin:1pt;Font-Size:10.25pt;Font-Weight:Bold;Font-Family:Segoe Ui, Arial,Tahoma,Comic Sans MS;Color:Black;BackGround-Color:#EFE9E3;Text-Align:Center;Vertical-Align:Top;}DIV{Font-Size:9.25pt;Font-Weight:Bold;Color:#008181;Font-Family:Segoe Ui, Arial,Tahoma,Comic Sans MS;width:250;}</STYLE><script LANGUAGE='JScript'>//-> Resize And Place In Approx centerwindow.resizeTo(327,150)window.moveTo(screen.availWidth/2-(327/2),screen.availHeight/2-(150/2))//-> Onloadwindow.onload=function(){var Act = new ActiveXObject("WScript.Shell");var Env = Act.Environment("System")var W6432 = Act.ExpandEnvironmentStrings("%PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432%");Tx1.innerHTML= '<TABLE>PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE=['+Env("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE")+']<TABLE>'+'<TABLE>PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432=['+W6432+']<TABLE>'}</SCRIPT><BODY><DIV ID='Tx1'>  </DIV></BODY>
post-5386-0-50886100-1362683657_thumb.pn

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Geej    0
Seems like Obj.AddressWidth method is much easier in vbscript. (in Post #20)

vbscript is not something I look or consider scripting as my first choice of language, also there are always so much to learn...

How difficult is the single line batch/comand using WMIC I posted in post 21?

Certainly not hard at all. I always have this "WOW' or "awesome" feeling for a single line code.

I wonder why David Wang comes up with such a confusing method using batch. He certainly confuse me :)

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