Jump to content

Welcome to MSFN Forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account



Photo

does WD external hdd work in W2K ?

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1
FuNkiTo

FuNkiTo

    Newbie

  • Member
  • 10 posts
  • Joined 08-December 12
  • OS:Windows 2000 Professional
  • Country: Country Flag
Hi!

I need more room in my hdd so I have decided to buy an external hdd. As I can read, no one specifies about wk2 but only xp, 7 and those new ones. I'm specially interested in this one:

http://western-digit...se-9496708.html

Any idea?? Thanks!!


How to remove advertisement from MSFN

#2
submix8c

submix8c

    Inconceivable!

  • Patrons
  • 4,373 posts
  • Joined 14-September 05
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
?
As long as it's recognized, my impression is that Win2000 and up supports up to 2.2tb. Maybe Win2K isn't mentioned because it's an unsupported OS? Notice that MAC OS doesn't show older either (and unsure IF older would support it).

Someone will correct me if I'm wrong on this.

Edited by submix8c, 10 March 2013 - 11:40 AM.

Someday the tyrants will be unthroned... Jason "Jay" Chasteen; RIP, bro!

Posted Image


#3
dencorso

dencorso

    Iuvat plus qui nihil obstat

  • Supervisor
  • 6,017 posts
  • Joined 07-April 07
  • OS:98SE
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

I confirm it supports Seagate 2 TB Free Agent External USB HDDs. Now, 2 TB is 1.862 GiB... so that much I guarantee it supports OK. USB 3.0 HDDs are no problem either, since they are guaranteed to work in USB 2.1 mode (i. e. "USB 2.0 compatibility mode). I see no reason whatsoever for any of the current 2 TB USB HDDs in the market to have compatibility problems with Win 2k, regardless of their brand.

#4
tomasz86

tomasz86

    www.windows2000.tk

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,525 posts
  • Joined 27-November 10
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
As long as you've got SP3 or newer installed and a USB 2.0 / 3.0 port (in case of USB 1.1 you may need a special cable and connect it to two ports at once)

Edited by tomasz86, 10 March 2013 - 11:43 AM.

post-47483-1123010975.png


#5
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,657 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

(in case of USB 1.1 you may need a special cable and connect it to two ports at once)

These are "news" for me, care to expand on this? :unsure:
Or are you talking of the common Y-cable to allow more than 500 mA to power the disk drive?
I am not aware of a change in specs before 3.0 :w00t: , i.e. the max is 5 units (of 100 mA each) on both USB 1.1 and USB 2.0 and was upgraded to 6 units (150 mA each) in USB 3.0.

jaclaz

#6
tomasz86

tomasz86

    www.windows2000.tk

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,525 posts
  • Joined 27-November 10
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

Or are you talking of the common Y-cable to allow more than 500 mA to power the disk drive?

I meant a Y-cable :ph34r: like this one:

Posted Image

post-47483-1123010975.png


#7
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,657 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag


Or are you talking of the common Y-cable to allow more than 500 mA to power the disk drive?

I meant a Y-cable :ph34r: like this one:

Never seen one of those, you mean something like this one:
http://www.amazon.co...d/dp/B0052OJ97O

They seem to be needed for *any* of USB 1.1, 2.0 or 3.0. (in the sense that you still have a female "A" connector on the motherboard, and if it USB 3.0 you don't need the "Y cable", but if it is indifferently a USB 1.1 or 2.0 you may need it) of course if the disk has a USB 3.0 "micro-B" connector.
Or am I missing something?

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 10 March 2013 - 02:36 PM.


#8
FuNkiTo

FuNkiTo

    Newbie

  • Member
  • 10 posts
  • Joined 08-December 12
  • OS:Windows 2000 Professional
  • Country: Country Flag
Thanks so much for your replies. I got SP4 installed, and my motherboard supports USB 2.0 ... I'm gonna buy it tomorrow, as my PC is starting to crash doing weird noises and freezing :wacko: I blame it on the dvd but not sure at all. I'll give you some news!

#9
tomasz86

tomasz86

    www.windows2000.tk

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,525 posts
  • Joined 27-November 10
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

Never seen one of those, you mean something like this one:
http://www.amazon.co...d/dp/B0052OJ97O

Isn't it same as the one above?

post-47483-1123010975.png


#10
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,657 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

Isn't it same as the one above?

Yes :), only instead of linkig to the image aI linked to a page where there is some textual description.

Let's try to expand on the matter, I am just trying to understand if there is a misunderstanding.

A USB 1.1 connector on a motherboard is (normally) an A-type connector female and can provide by specs up to 5*100=500 mA.
A USB 2.0 connector on a motherboard is (normally) an A-type connector female and can provide by specs up to 5*100=500 mA..
A USB 3.0 connector on a motherboard is (normally) an A-type connector female and can provide by specs up to 6*150=900 mA.

The A-type connector is the same (actually "compatible) for USB 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0.

A USB 3.0 connector on a 2.5" hard disk external enclosure may be a (USB 3.0) B-micro type.

To connect the enclosure to a motherboard you need a USB 3.0 cable.

Normally, i.e. if you have a USB 3.0 motherboard, you need a USB 3.0 cable with a A-type male connector on one end and a B-micro-type on the other.
Normally, i.e. if you have a USB 1.1 or 2.0 motherboard, you can use that same cable, as the hard disk won't need more than 500 mA.

In some cases where the motherboard provides less current than specs or the enclosure/disk requires more than 500 mA (which are THE SAME for USB 1.1 or 2.0) you need an Y cable, capable of getting some more current from another USB port.

So you need a USB 3.0 cable with a doubled power connector A-type besides the standard data/power A-type connector on one end and a B-micro-type on the other.

I am saying that there is not AFAIK any particular difference between USB 1.1 and 2.0 (apart data transfer speed that you might get) when connecting a USB 3.0 device, you seemed to say that there is one.

jaclaz

#11
FuNkiTo

FuNkiTo

    Newbie

  • Member
  • 10 posts
  • Joined 08-December 12
  • OS:Windows 2000 Professional
  • Country: Country Flag
I have already bought and checked this HDD and it's working really fine. I just plugged and started playing :thumbup It has a simple usb cable, the only problem I can see it's copying data a bit slow because of my USB2.0 and my old IDE hdd.

#12
tomasz86

tomasz86

    www.windows2000.tk

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,525 posts
  • Joined 27-November 10
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

I am saying that there is not AFAIK any particular difference between USB 1.1 and 2.0 (apart data transfer speed that you might get) when connecting a USB 3.0 device, you seemed to say that there is one.

Well, I said that because I myself had problems with my USB 3.0 external HDD (2.5") which is detected properly on my desktop when it's connected to a USB 2.0 port but is not detected at all when connected to a USB 1.1 port on an older laptop.

It just acted as if it wanted to start but couldn't (the LED was blinking). Same thing happens if I try to connect it to my desktop using a USB 2.0 extension cable. It must be connected directly to the USB 2.0 port in order to start properly. In case of that laptop it couldn't start even though it was connected directly to the USB 1.1 port.

Edited by tomasz86, 11 March 2013 - 06:08 AM.

post-47483-1123010975.png


#13
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,657 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

Well, I said that because I myself had problems with my USB 3.0 external HDD (2.5") which is detected properly on my desktop when it's connected to a USB 2.0 port but is not detected at all when connected to a USB 1.1 port on an older laptop.

It just acted as if it wanted to start but couldn't (the LED was blinking). Same thing happens if I try to connect it to my desktop using a USB 2.0 extension cable. It must be connected directly to the USB 2.0 port in order to start properly. In case of that laptop it couldn't start even though it was connected directly to the USB 1.1 port.

I see :), maybe (being an "early" laptop) it provides less than spec current?

BUT the issue with an USB 2.0 extension cable is "queer". :w00t: :ph34r:

I mean. an extension cable is "passive" and if you give to it 500 mA at one end, you can surely can get AT LEAST 499.999 mA at the other end ;), though it is possible that you have a voltage drop, see how in practice:
http://www.girr.org/.../usb_stuff.html
It seems like *everything* or nearly everything is "out of specs", one way or the other.

Maybe they are two different causes (the one being the laptop not providing enough "juice", and the other one about the HD somehow *sensing* the extension cable as "not suitable" for data transfer, i.e. not related to current or causing a too high voltage drop). :unsure:

jaclaz

#14
Dagorlad

Dagorlad
  • Member
  • 6 posts
  • Joined 11-March 13
  • OS:Windows 2000 Professional
  • Country: Country Flag
The USB spec evolved quite a bit over the years. The latest USB 2 spec allows for as much as 1500mA to be drawn from a port if the port is capable of supplying that much current. The current power spec can be found here.

#15
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,657 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

The USB spec evolved quite a bit over the years. The latest USB 2 spec allows for as much as 1500mA to be drawn from a port if the port is capable of supplying that much current. The current power spec can be found here.

Yes :), but here we are talking of the "minimum" you can surely find on a USB port, that is the "old" specs of 5 "units".

jaclaz

#16
Tripredacus

Tripredacus

    K-Mart-ian Legend

  • Super Moderator
  • 9,958 posts
  • Joined 28-April 06
  • OS:Server 2012
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

The USB spec evolved quite a bit over the years. The latest USB 2 spec allows for as much as 1500mA to be drawn from a port if the port is capable of supplying that much current. The current power spec can be found here.


Some users may not click your link, expecting some sort of documentation but you have linked to a zip. In the future you are required to specify exactly what is in this type of download (which has 2 PDF files in the zip) ... see rule 1c.

:hello:
MSFN RULES | GimageX HTA for PE 3-5 | lol probloms
tpxmsfn1_zps393339c1.jpg

#17
tomasz86

tomasz86

    www.windows2000.tk

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,525 posts
  • Joined 27-November 10
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

BUT the issue with an USB 2.0 extension cable is "queer". :w00t: :ph34r:

I've just bought a USB 3.0 extension cable and replaced the old USB 2.0 extension cable with it. The HDD works correctly when connected through the new one so there's definitely something about it ;)

Edited by tomasz86, 29 March 2013 - 04:26 AM.

post-47483-1123010975.png





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users