Jump to content

Welcome to MSFN Forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account



Photo

Diminutive Device to Detect Drones Hovering Overhead


  • Please log in to reply
120 replies to this topic

#1
monroe

monroe

    Friend of MSFN

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 953 posts
  • Joined 21-May 07
  • OS:XP Pro x86
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

Just now read an interesting article about this Drone detector ... I have seen pictures of tiny bug like drones that look like dragon flies and mosquitoes, but I don't think they are flying yet to be looking in our windows and such. Just posted for thoughts from others. I'm not familiar with that $25 computer but reading more on it now.

Tiny Device Will Detect Domestic Drones

http://www.usnews.co...domestic-drones

A Washington, D.C.-based engineer is working on the "Drone Shield," a small, Wi-Fi-connected device that uses a microphone to detect a drone's "acoustic signatures" (sound frequency and spectrum) when it's within range.

The company's founder, John Franklin, who has been working in aerospace engineering for seven years, says he hopes to start selling the device sometime this year. He is using the Kickstarter-like IndieGoGo to finance the project.

The device will cost $69 and will be about the size of a USB thumb drive. It will use Raspberry Pi – a tiny, $25 computer – and commercially available microphones to detect drones. He says he imagines that people will attach the Drone Shield to their fences or roofs to protect their home from surveillance.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Insect Spy Drone

http://www.snopes.co...insectdrone.asp

I stand corrected ... this mosquito drone must be in production ... it not only takes pictures but can land on you and get a DNA sample.

... where are the "olden days" ?

Edited by duffy98, 02 May 2013 - 09:51 AM.



How to remove advertisement from MSFN

#2
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,863 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

Insect Spy Drone

http://www.snopes.co...insectdrone.asp

I stand corrected ... this mosquito drone must be in production ... it not only takes pictures but can land on you and get a DNA sample.

... where are the "olden days" ?

Oww, come off it.
Snopes,com is a place where URBAN LEGENDS are collected (and usually debunked):
http://www.snopes.com/

Welcome to snopes.com, the definitive Internet reference source for urban legends, folklore, myths, rumors, and misinformation. Use the search box above to locate your item of interest, or click one of the icons below to browse the site by category.


http://www.snopes.co...insectdrone.asp

The specific mosquito-like object pictured above is, however, just a conceptual mock-up of a design for a MAV, not a photograph of an actual working device "already in production." And although taking DNA samples or inserting micro-RFID tracking devices under the skin of people are MAV applications that may some day be possible, such possibilities currently appear to be speculative fiction rather than reality.


In any case from the page of the project:
http://www.indiegogo...ts/droneshield/

DroneShield is a device that detects the presence of nearby drones (including RC helicopters, quadrotors, etc) and issues alerts via email, sms, and/or a flashing light. The goal is to help preserve your privacy from low-cost remote-control air vehicles with video cameras.

By definition *anything* used by the US Government is NOT low cost (except maybe a number of their employees) ;).

One of the best urban myths around is about the awful amount of money that NASA supposedly spent for developing the "space pen":
http://www.snopes.co...us/spacepen.asp

Like most Urban Myths it has however some grounds, the 34 pencils costed $128.84 apiece :w00t:
http://www.thespacer...m/article/613/1

Earlier in the month, several newspapers reported that the mission would carry two pencils that cost $128.84 apiece. NASA had spent $4,382.50 to purchase 34 of the pencils.


jaclaz

#3
monroe

monroe

    Friend of MSFN

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 953 posts
  • Joined 21-May 07
  • OS:XP Pro x86
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

So the drone mosquito is still a myth ... that's what I had read last year, just an idea ... but the article seem to be updated from a year ago. I added that site to my Favorites.

However, this article has since come out since I posted earlier today ... not as real looking as the mosquito drone but they are "flying".

Flight of the RoboBee

http://www.csmonitor...ot-creates-buzz

May 02, 2013

The successful controlled flight of the tiny RoboBee – designed by a team at Harvard – represents a key step in the development of insect-size drones with a range of potential uses.

A robotic fly with a body not much taller than a penny standing on edge has taken to the air, passing its tests with flying colors. The Robobee, as it's called, is the smallest artificial insect yet flown, according to the team that built it.
...

Edited by duffy98, 02 May 2013 - 08:30 PM.


#4
dencorso

dencorso

    Iuvat plus qui nihil obstat

  • Supervisor
  • 6,126 posts
  • Joined 07-April 07
  • OS:98SE
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

Wow! RoboBee, indeed... It exists, weighs about 80 mg, takes off and flies controlledly (for a time) then crash-lands, at present. However, it's still tethered because power source and computer-flight-control are not onboard. It weighs 80 mg! The reference is: Ma et al., Controlled Flight of a Biologically Inspired, Insect-Scale Robot, Science 340, 603-607 (3 May 2013); DOI: 10.1126/science.1231806

#5
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,863 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
Yeah, sure :).
Please, do wake me up when those things will have some decent fying time/range, a camera, remote image transmission (or recording capabilities) and become low-cost.

Sincerely yours,
Rip Van Winkle ;)

#6
monroe

monroe

    Friend of MSFN

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 953 posts
  • Joined 21-May 07
  • OS:XP Pro x86
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

OK ... so there is more work to be done! ... I will still be looking more "closely" at dragonflies and mosquitoes from now on!
:P

Dragonfly

http://www.theverge....ckward-in-video


http://theawesomer.c...y-drone/206931/

...

Edited by duffy98, 03 May 2013 - 04:28 AM.


#7
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,863 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
The Bionicopter dragonfly is a really nice project/thingie, still even without the senseless "Drone Shield" I presume I can detect (even without my glasses on) a 44 cm long (63 cm wingspan) dragonfly hovering near my window....


jaclaz

#8
monroe

monroe

    Friend of MSFN

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 953 posts
  • Joined 21-May 07
  • OS:XP Pro x86
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

Very funny ... I will admit I also haven't seen any dragonflies that large in the wild ... at this time I don't happen to live near a nuclear plant, so I can't be absolutely sure what could be "hovering" around there!
...

#9
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,863 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

I will admit I also haven't seen any dragonflies that large in the wild ...


...or more likely you need better glasses or a "Dragonfly Shield" device.....

More seriously, you might have heard either hunters or fishers claiming ;) to have catched one, once.....


jaclaz

#10
monroe

monroe

    Friend of MSFN

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 953 posts
  • Joined 21-May 07
  • OS:XP Pro x86
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

Well look at this ... the drones are flying ...

Seattle Man Hovers Drone Over a Family’s House for ‘Research’

http://betabeat.com/...e-for-research/

...

#11
dencorso

dencorso

    Iuvat plus qui nihil obstat

  • Supervisor
  • 6,126 posts
  • Joined 07-April 07
  • OS:98SE
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

Non-tripulated flying devices, capable of stationary flight are there for a long time already... here's a Brazilian one, used mainly in agriculture: VANT. I see no big deal in them, they make a real loud sound while hovering or flying, one cannot really overlook them.

#12
monroe

monroe

    Friend of MSFN

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 953 posts
  • Joined 21-May 07
  • OS:XP Pro x86
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

Interesting photo ... I really didn't pay too much attention to drones till about 8 months ago ... the only drones I was actually aware of were what the US military was using and some other governments in various parts of the world. In the last 8 months the use of drones has exploded in the US with different police departments and the government using them for everything ... in my opinion (only) I can see them as a real benefit in fighting crime but I can also see them being used by criminals to check an estate out to be robbed or a peeping tom looking in windows or someone in the backyard sunbathing ... thinking they are very private. As I said, this is all very new as these things begin to get into the hands of people that shouldn't have them ... a little like hidden cameras in motel / hotel rooms or restrooms, maybe drones are a little worse, since they can quickly move away and disappear but someone has to take a chance and go back into a restroom or motel room and get rid of the "evidence" ... just my opinion on this new form of spying ... I can see a private detective really having use for one of these "spy drones". I don't watch many detective shows these days but I'll bet we will start seeing episodes with drones being used to spy or check some "bad guys" out ... I just can't say that small drones haven't already been in an episode of a private detective or police show. It's a whole new thing.

#13
dencorso

dencorso

    Iuvat plus qui nihil obstat

  • Supervisor
  • 6,126 posts
  • Joined 07-April 07
  • OS:98SE
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

"Drone", in that sense, was a relatively rarely used word in English, outside comics, for a long time until the news about military uses and police uses began to hit the net, perhaps starting as far as two years ago. In that sense, a "drone" usually meant a fairily big and expensive unmanned plane-like machine, capable of taking great pictures from high altitude, or to hit some target literaly "out of the blue", in which case there uses to be an explosive payload, instead of just cam hardware. This much comes mostly from my watching and reading mainly CNN International (but also Fox News sometimes).

Now, the possibility of snooping -- as you painted it -- was there from much before that, because miniature autonomous recording cams (aka "spy cams") are inexpensive and available all over the internet for more than 5 years, and remote controlled plane and helicopter aeromodels to transport and host them are around for far longer than 20 years already and are very inconspicuous, however loud, because they're usually seen as harmless toys. It's just a matter of putting one of each together, and there you got your own personal snooper drone. I'm really surprised, now you made me think of it, that I've never heard of it having been done... then again, this doesn't mean it really hasn't, since it may simply really go unnoticed most of the time, and forgotten about the rest of it.

BTW, look here, for instance.

*B*U*T* --- there's a *real* long way between all this and a picture-taking, working, mechatronic mosquito.

#14
Tripredacus

Tripredacus

    K-Mart-ian Legend

  • Super Moderator
  • 10,022 posts
  • Joined 28-April 06
  • OS:Server 2012
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

"Drone", in that sense, was a relatively rarely used word in English, outside comics, for a long time until the news about military uses and police uses began to hit the net, perhaps starting as far as two years ago. In that sense, a "drone" usually meant a fairily big and expensive unmanned plane-like machine


Maybe times are changing, but I still think of bees and ants when I hear or read the word "drone" as well as the song by Fear Factory.
MSFN RULES | GimageX HTA for PE 3-5 | lol probloms
tpxmsfn1_zps393339c1.jpg

#15
monroe

monroe

    Friend of MSFN

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 953 posts
  • Joined 21-May 07
  • OS:XP Pro x86
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

For sure "times are changing" ... Perhaps tiny small spy drones don't exist yet ... the size of a mosquito but perhaps one day. Just found this larger drone that runs on batteries and not gasoline ... it's the "spying" part that I think is a real threat to all of us ... whether in the hands of the "good boys" or the "bad guys".

Men Build Small Flying Spy Drone that Cracks Wi-Fi and Cell Data - Digital Trends

http://mstanley2265....-digital-trends

http://www.digitaltr...-and-cell-data/


Built by Mike Tassey and Richard Perkins, the Wireless Aerial Surveillance Platform (otherwise known as the WASP) is a flying drone that has a 6-foot wingspan, a 6-foot length and weighs in at 14 pounds. The small form factor of the unmanned aerial vehicle allows it to drop under radar and is often mistaken for a large bird. It was built from an Army target drone and converted to run on electric batteries rather than gasoline. It can also be loaded with GPS information and fly a predetermined course without need for an operator. Taking off and landing have to be done manually with the help of a mounted HD camera, though. However, the most interesting aspect of the drone is that it can crack Wi-Fi networks and GSM networks as well as collect the data from them.

It can accomplish this feat with a Linux computer on-board that’s no bigger than a deck of cards. The computer accesses 32GB of storage to house all that stolen data. It uses a variety of networking hacking tools including the BackTrack toolset, as well as a 340-million-word dictionary to guess passwords. In order to access cell phone data, the WASP impersonates AT&T and T-Mobile cell phone towers and fools phones into connecting to one of the eleven antennas on-board. The drone can then record conversations to the storage card, and avoids dropping the call due to the 4G T-mobile card routing communications through VoIP.


also ...

America's Smallest Military Spy Drone Can Land on Your Window Sill

http://voices.yahoo....ur-7895750.html


The Nano Hummingbird looks and flies like a real hummingbird. In fact, though, it is a tiny spy drone, capable of flying onto your window sill, recording data, and then flying back to its military handlers. With tiny spy technology like the Nano Hummingbird available, no government's secrets are safe.

Imagine how easy it would be to use the Nano Hummingbird to spy on foreign diplomats. It would simply have to land on their window sill and record audio and video. But while the Nano is a hummingbird now, we have to believe that someday it will be a bumble bee, or a gnat. In other words, someday it will be unnoticeably small, capable of flying stealthily through the interior of a building, recording and transmitting information, without being detected.

also ...

I posted about this dragon fly drone earlier but this is a different web site with more info


This tiny robotic dragonfly drone only costs $119

http://www.geek.com/...ts-119-1533241/


I can see stealth drones all the rage one day ... they are probably in the works now or maybe quietly flying already. Too expensive for "ordinary folks" but tiny little spy drones don't seem to be out of the reach of ordinary people.
...

Edited by duffy98, 16 May 2013 - 08:50 AM.


#16
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,863 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
But still, you will not need a tiny device to detect these :ph34r: :
http://www.dailymail...ll-targets.html
BTW the idea of recharging batteries from power lines is IMHO great! :thumbup

And they can be lethal, not completely unlike ninja cats :w00t: :
http://bunkstrutts.f...jpg?w=450&h=360
Spoiler


@duffy98
JFYI, that dragonfly is not the same dragonfly as the one you talked about previously.

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 16 May 2013 - 09:15 AM.


#17
monroe

monroe

    Friend of MSFN

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 953 posts
  • Joined 21-May 07
  • OS:XP Pro x86
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

Well jaclaz, as rloew posted in another thread under Windows 9x ... "Since you just love to nitpick. Show me where any of us said it is the ONLY way." ... with emphasis on the word "nitpick" ! :thumbup

I actually got my 6 inch thick magnifying glass out and checked both images ... they look pretty close to me ... maybe a different name. ... but the price matches and the images look the same at two different angles.

1st mention:

http://theawesomer.c...y-drone/206931/


2nd mention:

http://www.geek.com/...ts-119-1533241/


Oh well, no matter ... all in good fun! ... I will let others be the judge. This is all new stuff and rapidly changing as I see it. We can all joke about it now but in the future some (or many) may not find it so funny.
...

#18
dencorso

dencorso

    Iuvat plus qui nihil obstat

  • Supervisor
  • 6,126 posts
  • Joined 07-April 07
  • OS:98SE
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

The entry below is from the Oxford English Dictionary. Please notice the dates of the quotes for the use of interest. It's clear that it must have started as part of military jargon from WWII and slowly gained some foothold in general usage from that point. However, while it was just a concept, devoid of reality, it never became an important sense to "drone", until very recently. Things have changed already: they do exist, operate and can kill. Next step is to miniaturize (which procedure enhances their threat and/or paranoia potential)!

drone, n1

2. fig. b. A pilotless aircraft or missile directed by remote control. Also attrib.
1946 in Amer. Speech (1947) XXII. 228/2 The Navy's drones will be led — by radio control, of course — to a landing field at Roi. Ibid., The drone planes. 1947 Britannica Bk. of Yr. 840/2 Drone, a plane handled by remote control from a control or mother ship. 1958 Illustr. London News 10 May 770/3 The C-130 will be adapted for the launching and direction of drone missiles. 1966 M. Woodhouse Tree Frog iii. 26 Nobody in their right minds would fly a drone out into that sort of radar cover. Ibid. v. 41 A long-range, high-altitude drone surveillance aircraft. 1970 Daily Tel. 7 Jan. 4 Unmanned spy aircraft—drones—are to be developed by the American armed services.



#19
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,863 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

Well jaclaz, as rloew posted in another thread under Windows 9x ... "Since you just love to nitpick. Show me where any of us said it is the ONLY way." ... with emphasis on the word "nitpick" ! :thumbup

Maybe there is a misunderstanding. :)

We earlier talked about the Festo BionicOpter dragonfly, which you mentioned on post #6 of this thread as 1st item, and that I referenced in post #7 as "Bionicopter dragonfly".

If you prefer in post #6 you gave links to two different "dragonfly" projects, one by Festo and one by Techjet, and later I posted about the (relatively big) size of the Festo one.

In post #15 you posted about the second (Techjet) much smaller device and it's price.

jaclaz

#20
monroe

monroe

    Friend of MSFN

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 953 posts
  • Joined 21-May 07
  • OS:XP Pro x86
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

All in good fun .... no matter. Things are changing as posts are added. Now there is "dancing with the drones"

Dances With Drones

Dancing with drones demonstrates robotic integration into human world.

http://www.usnews.co...nto-performance


... This Drone Can Fit In Your Palm

http://blogs.smithso...t-in-your-palm/

The Norwegian-manufactured machines currently rank as the world’s smallest military-grade spy drone, weighing just 16 grams and measuring at 4 inches long. Dubbed the Black Hornet, the sneaky little choppers carry just a steerable camera that takes still and video images.


Now this is interesting ... I have been thinking of small flying drones but just how big can a flying drone be? I missed this drone special that aired January 23, 2013 on PBS, the show Nova.

Program Description:

Drones ... These unmanned flying robots–some as large as jumbo jets, others as small as birds.

http://www.pbs.org/w...the-drones.html


I hadn't given much thought to how large an actual drone might be ... some as large as jumbo jets.

...

Edited by duffy98, 16 May 2013 - 10:52 AM.


#21
dencorso

dencorso

    Iuvat plus qui nihil obstat

  • Supervisor
  • 6,126 posts
  • Joined 07-April 07
  • OS:98SE
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

Large drones present very-few to no technological challenges at this point in time, since the onboard remote-control and/or guidance-AI are necessarily relatively not very heavy and conventional fuels very energy efficient at those scales. A mosquito-sized drone would need to have most or all of its guidance-AI off-board and a very tiny, almost weightless, remote control unit. That's feasible, although very difficult. But the only energy source efficient enough to have it flying and doing anything useful at all for at least some minutes would be a stasis-field trapped Kamehameha (viz. かめはめ波) orb, or the like, which is, of course, beyond science.

#22
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,863 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
Now it would be the right time to get some tacos delivered to you by a drone :thumbup :
http://tacocopter.com/

BUT :(:
Spoiler


jaclaz

#23
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,863 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

The entry below is from the Oxford English Dictionary. Please notice the dates of the quotes for the use of interest. It's clear that it must have started as part of military jargon from WWII and slowly gained some foothold in general usage from that point.


This source:
http://www.etymonlin....php?term=drone

drone (n.)
Old English dran, dræn "male honeybee," from Proto-Germanic *dran- (cf. Middle Dutch drane; Old High German treno; German Drohne, which is from Middle Low German drone), probably imitative; given a figurative sense of "idler, lazy worker" (male bees make no honey) 1520s. Meaning "pilotless aircraft" is from 1946.
Drones, as the radio-controlled craft are called, have many potentialities, civilian and military. Some day huge mother ships may guide fleets of long-distance, cargo-carrying airplanes across continents and oceans. Long-range drones armed with atomic bombs could be flown by accompanying mother ships to their targets and in for perfect hits. ["Popular Science," November, 1946]
Meaning "deep, continuous humming sound" is early 16c., apparently imitative (cf. threnody). The verb in the sound sense is early 16c.; it often is the characteristic sound of airplane engines. Related: Droned; droning.


suggests that it has an onomatopeic origin and quotes Popular Science Magazine as source in 1946.

BUT, here there is a somehow more convincing ehtimology/history:
http://usmilitary.ab...mor/a/words.htm

DRONE. A drone is a collective name for pilotless aircraft. But original meaning was and is 'the male of the honeybee and other bees'. This particular kind of the insect through clear associations was connected with such notions as 'one who lives on the labor of others', 'an idler', 'a sluggard'.

These associations underlie the transfer of the meaning to an aircraft which was steered by remote control without a pilot. Initially, pilotless aircraft were used as air targets for training AA gun crews. These targets were marked with black stripes along the tail part of the fuselage. These stripes looked like those of a drone (the insect). Hence, the nickname. Nowadays pilotless aircraft are distinguished as drones and RPVs (remotely-piloted vehicles). Drones are program-guided while RPVs are piloted from a distance by operators. It is curious to know that bomber air crews called jokingly air gunners 'drones'. Probably because air gunners were idle during flights and had only lots of things to do when firing at enemy fighters.


And now, for NO apparent reason, xkcd! :thumbup
Spoiler


:lol:

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 17 May 2013 - 06:38 AM.


#24
dencorso

dencorso

    Iuvat plus qui nihil obstat

  • Supervisor
  • 6,126 posts
  • Joined 07-April 07
  • OS:98SE
  • Country: Country Flag

Donator

BUT, here there is a somehow more convincing ehtimology/history:
http://usmilitary.ab...mor/a/words.htm

DRONE. [...] Initially, pilotless aircraft were used as air targets for training AA gun crews. These targets were marked with black stripes along the tail part of the fuselage. These stripes looked like those of a drone (the insect). Hence, the nickname. Nowadays pilotless aircraft are distinguished as drones and RPVs (remotely-piloted vehicles). Drones are program-guided while RPVs are piloted from a distance by operators.[...]

Bravo! Posted Image

That makes sense as the origin of the meaning, and comes from military use as expected (and is probably pre-1946, of course, since by 1946 the usage was so widespread it leaked into common usage).

#25
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,863 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

That makes sense as the origin of the meaning, and comes from military use as expected (and is probably pre-1946, of course, since by 1946 the usage was so widespread it leaked into common usage).

Yep, and additionally I have an actual pic, the interesting part being that some were yellow with black stripes:
http://www.bombercom...a/lysander.html

225 Lysanders were built in Canada by National Steel Car of Toronto. Many were painted in distinctive yellow and black stripes and used primarily as target drone tugs at Bombing and Gunnery schools of the BCATP.


Posted Image

You cannot actually look at it and not think to a bee or wasp or drone. :thumbup

See also the PIA (no, not a PITA ;)) for google drones bugs:
http://amberhawk.typ...ection-law.html

The 3D StreetView Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) appended to Google’s Privacy Policy, shows how it complies with European Data Protection laws. For instance, to ensure maximum transparency of data collection, the drones are to be repainted in wasp-like reflective yellow and black stripes and to be fitted with loudspeakers.

The Assessment recommends that the drones should not be silent and “should emit a suitable sound, something like the low frequency buzz of a Doodlebug” (a reference to the Nazi V1 flying bomb). Other suggestions for a sound is the continual emission of the Morse Code for Google to identify the data controller (“--.” : “---“ : “---“ : “--.” : “.-..” and “.”)

The PIA does not call its drones, “GoogleBugs” but I am sure that this name is likely to catch on as Google develops its drone functionality. However, the PIA does recommend that the drone’s facility to intercept satellite communications is switched off “to avoid issues similar to the capture of WiFi logon-details by StreeView camera cars”.


jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz, 17 May 2013 - 11:27 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users