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BYOD (ideas, opinions, whatever)


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4 replies to this topic

#1
jaclaz

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I personally find the whole idea of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) as being second in stupidity only to the cloud (when it comes to security, privacy, integrity of data).
But I would like to understand what other members think of the idea/approach, if they have any experience (poositive/negative/neutral) about it, etc.

Some "introductory" reference:

http://www.cio.com/a...nk_Again?page=1
http://www.cio.com/a...on_the_Decline_
http://www.cultofmac...-ipads-at-work/
http://www.infosecur...a-grip-on-byod/
http://www.theregist...security_snafu/
http://www.darkreadi...ck-ha/240157439

And some personal ideas on the matter:
http://www.forensicf...wtopic/t=10567/

jaclaz


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#2
bpalone

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Jaclaz, I agree that it is somewhat of an exercise in idiocy. What, if anything, is to keep the corporate/enterprise overlords from snooping on your personal data? I say absolutely nothing, and would further venture to suggest that it probably would be done, especially if you routinely handle sensitive data for your employer. They would want to know if you were fixing to jump ship and if you were seriously considering taking any data with you.

Now from the corporate/enterprise side of the equation. Knowing, John Q. Averages computing habits and skills, would you want your sensitive data on their hardware? I doubt it.

Now, if the employee does not handle sensitive data and the employee is willing to accept the snooping and the possible loss of all their data, then maybe.

Just my $0.02 worth, and worth just what you paid for it, nothing.

bpalone

#3
Formfiller

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We live in such greedy times, that employers are too cheap to buy work equipment for their employees.

Edited by Formfiller, 29 June 2013 - 07:36 AM.


#4
5eraph

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My thoughts exactly, Formfiller.

#5
HalloweenDocument12

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Coming from a smaller organization, the biggest problem is tech support. Buying a fleet of business-class machines and cloning onto them a tested and locked down deployment image makes support manageable but using arbitrary hardware opens the business up to every conceivable issue. If it's simply the user's personal machine then he wouldn't care too much if it were down for some amount of time but being used for work makes it a missing critical piece of equipment, even though the purchase is not approached as mission critical.

We tried it with VMs, but that radically increases the price to just about the point of two computers and non-tech people find VMs very difficult to operate, even if we leave hints like customized backgrounds and/or different themes.

The issue is not that much better with Macs, especially Macs that have been through the upgrade process, which doesn't work any better there than it does with Windows.

BYOD works best with tablets, which are significantly more locked down than PCs by default. But this tablet usage assumes the infrastructure already exists. For example, Salesforce's mobile version is competent. I expect to see more in the future but don't see how tablets, BYOD or not, graduate from companion devices. In our office, the iPads, which we provided, went from "I love it so much and use it for everything" to "I use it to check email on the road". After the initial euphoria wears off, which may take a few months, users start to notice suboptimal usage.

Edited by HalloweenDocument12, 29 June 2013 - 01:41 PM.





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