Jump to content

Welcome to MSFN Forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account



Photo

Norton and WMD


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1
JorgeA

JorgeA

    FORMAT B: /V /S

  • MSFN Sponsor
  • 3,225 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10
  • OS:Vista Home Premium x64
  • Country: Country Flag

Symantec is offering me an updated version of their Norton 360 suite, and when I went to read the EULA I came across the following text there:

 

USE OR FACILITATION OF SYMANTEC PRODUCT IN CONNECTION WITH ANY ACTIVITY INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, FABRICATION, TRAINING, OR TESTING OF CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, OR NUCLEAR MATERIALS, OR MISSILES, DRONES, OR SPACE LAUNCH VEHICLES CAPABLE OF DELIVERING WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION IS PROHIBITED, IN ACCORDANCE WITH U.S. LAW.

 

Now some folks here might want to joke about Norton possibly being a "weapon of mass (PC) destruction" ;) , but more seriously I'd be curious as to what you all think the section above could be talking about. The only WMD connection I can think of is that the EULA prohibits using Norton products to try to stop packages like Stuxnet that are intended to mess up the computers running production facilities such as (but not only) uranium enrichment centrifuges. Could that be it? Any other possibilities? :unsure:

 

Other than that, I'm scratching my head.

 

--JorgeA

 




How to remove advertisement from MSFN

#2
jaclaz

jaclaz

    The Finder

  • Developer
  • 14,579 posts
  • Joined 23-July 04
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag

Actually it could be a form of advertisement (or to have full legal compliance with some Lawyers only know obscure US Defense/NSA regulations).

 

Of course if I were a some-non-US-country war lord or a terrorist or more simply Dr. Evil (or a top villain from SPECTRE :w00t: ) and I wanted to play a little with chemical or nuclear weapons my first thought would be to call my IT guy and order him to make sure that all software has the proper license and is respecting the EULA's beforehand.

You see, if by chance you survive my nuclear or chemical attack and manage to get your hands on me, I don't want (besides being processed as a War Criminal) to be charged for breaking a software license and risk being fined for it, or even have, say, two years added to my infinite prison sentence (or death sentence) :ph34r:

 

jaclaz


Edited by jaclaz, 28 September 2013 - 12:59 PM.


#3
TELVM

TELVM

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 303 posts
  • Joined 09-February 12
  • OS:Windows 7 x64
  • Country: Country Flag

Review_AdmiralAckbarTVC_stillA.JPG

 

"That's it! That's the Death Star's weak spot we were looking for!"



#4
ROTS

ROTS

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 233 posts
  • Joined 22-September 12
  • OS:none specified
  • Country: Country Flag
http://www.engadget....friday-runaway/

The bottom line they do not want people to have any privacy so, that "Super cops" could continue to be on Uncle-Sams tab. Basically alot of ex-military types need bread on their tables, and it is easy to abuse people who do nothing harmless, to anybody at all, then to go after real criminals.

Norton, is not built into the operating system, as with many programs that keeps unwanted guests out. If you understand how OS are oriented, then you also understand that a Super-Cop would want to get as much dirt on somebody before that attacked them. Because most officers nowaday avoids being sued.

Eitherway their is nothing to fear but fear itself. So we should not think in that manor. I also see alot of hidden messages in various "programs" that informs me of my activities. The bottom-line is that you should not support advancement in technology as possible. Boycotting holidays is a must.

Edited by ROTS, 29 September 2013 - 07:18 PM.


#5
MrJinje

MrJinje

    Toolâ„¢ Developer

  • Developer
  • 1,051 posts
  • Joined 14-October 09
  • OS:Server 2012R2
  • Country: Country Flag

Norton is big and clunky, see how much effort they put into the timing clock. 

 

281.jpg

 

A better choice might be to use McAfee. Just plug and play.

 

283.jpg






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users