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Windows 10 - First Impressions


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#401
NoelC

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Make sure to look up how to deconfigure Skype from making your system into a SuperNode.

 

-Noel




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#402
JorgeA

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Windows 10 won't be the operating system I was hoping for

When Microsoft announced it would be listening to users and implementing changes based on feedback, I was excited. Sure, a camel is a horse created by a committee, too many cooks spoil the broth and all that, but at least it meant that the sort of blatant usability problems Microsoft managed to somehow miss in Windows 8 wouldn’t occur in Windows 10. However, as time has ticked past I've started to doubt that Microsoft is listening as closely to Windows Insiders as it claims to be.

 

Remember when then-Windows division CFO Tami Reller said of the demand for a Start button, "We've really tried to understand what people are really asking for when they're asking for that", and the end result was the introduction of a Start button in Windows 8.1 that was not -- in the slightest -- like anything anyone had asked for? Windows 10 seems a bit like that.

 

In Build 9841 we actually had a decent Start menu. I liked it. I found it to be the perfect blend of old (Start menu) and new (Start screen). We still have that menu, right? Well yes and no. With the original version, the tiled area on the right expanded or contracted as you added or removed tiles. So if you like apps, it would spread right across the desktop. If you hate tiles, just unpinning them all would give you a standard old school Start menu. Not now. Unpin every app and you end up with a giant blank space on the right. The original Start menu could be resized by clicking and dragging on the top edge. Now you have the choice between large and full screen, and that’s it.

 

I can’t imagine Windows testers shouted for that change. That’s pure Microsoft just not wanting to let go of the Start screen concept.

 

--JorgeA

 

 



#403
JorgeA

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What's a SuperNode?

 

(Forgive my ignorance, I haven't used Skype since it was bought and changed by Microsoft.)

 

--JorgeA



#404
JorgeA

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Windows 10: Smooth user experience it ain't

 

It seems that Microsoft is aware that Windows 10 could be something of a disappointment. So keen is the company to get it installed on as many devices as possible, the company recently announced that there will not be obstacles placed in the way of upgrading from pirated copies of Windows 7 and 8.

 

I hadn't thought of this angle, interesting.

 

--JorgeA

 

 

 



#405
vinifera

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dunno if here was mentioned

but they also doing s*** to be able be installed on Android devices


If you want true Windows user experience
try Longhorn builds: 3718, 4029, 4066

#406
TELVM

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Epic comment:

 

... Windows 10 so far is a slight elaboration of Win 8, nothing more. Microsoft is not willing to abandon its silly Win8 experiment and Win10 is simply another way of forcing down our throat the stupid "Metro" idiocy. I understand that Microsoft desperately wants to be a player in the mobile OSes, but this is not the way to do it. It is now trying to use Win10 as a vehicle for its "Universal Apps" but these "Universal Apps" are not really universal because nobody with a sane mind would use them in a desktop environment. These are simple mobile apps.

 

Many companies enter into this group think vision where all kinds of resources are thrown to the pursuit of a market segment. Many end up being destroyed by these pursuits.

 

My prediction of what is going to happen: Microsoft would finally release this mongrel called Win10. A variety of utilities will come out to convert it to something that looks and behaves like Win7. People are going to get the free upgrade and then buy these utilities. Nobody would worry or bother to run these "Universal apps". In fact, I predict that there would be all kinds of programs removing them automatically for a "Metro-free" experience. In the same manner, Windows Phone 10 would not go anywhere.

 

I think that this would be Microsoft's last hurrah in pursuing the mobile OS market. After a while, the company is going to settle in the new reality and maybe, just maybe release a decent desktop OS.

 


Edited by TELVM, 27 March 2015 - 01:43 AM.


#407
jaclaz

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What's a SuperNode?

 

(Forgive my ignorance, I haven't used Skype since it was bought and changed by Microsoft.)

Basically something that betters your experience on the internet ;) making use of your PC and bandwidth for Microsoft use.

http://community.spi...g-for-windows-7

 

jaclaz



#408
NoelC

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There would be those who would say that if everyone refused to be made a full fledged cloud member (i.e., sharing one's resources with the world for their use on demand) that the whole cloud concept wouldn't work.

 

I've often wondered...  What would be wrong with that?

 

Clearly people do not like the ugly truth when it's presented plainly, and probably a lot of them would not choose to share THEIR resources for others' use freely, so Microsoft has to coerce and mislead (or just outright do it with assumed permission) in order to get people to do it.

 

There is a TV commercial going on presently here in the US that claims (in a roundabout way) that doctors will only be able to cure cancer if they use the resources of the Microsoft cloud, because the processing needed on computers the doctors themselves could fund would take weeks to do what the cloud could do in minutes.

 

Socialized computing.  Just what we need to bring everyone down to the same level.

 

-Noel



#409
jaclaz

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Well, but there are ways where "socialized computing" makes some sense, if we temporarily set aside the actual meaningfulness of the "final" scope (which may well be subject to debate) initiatives like (say) SETI @ Home:

http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/

or the Great Mersenne Prime Search:

http://www.mersenne.org/

are examples of "complete waste of computing power in a social way" (waste in the sense that people can cry and stamp their feet as hard as they can, still an used computer will draw more power from the mains than an idle one), while Bitcoin mining is an example of wasting even more power in an completely selfish way.

 

BUt if you look at a more complete projects list here:

http://en.wikipedia....puting_projects

some, related to research in medicine and/or biology (i.e. IMHO slightly more "relevant" or "practical" problems than - say - finding a unique Sudoku solution or decrypting a WW 2 enigma cyphered message) might well :yes: (on a voluntarily basis of course) be worth the electricity costs and/or the bandwidth usage (and each and every of these can be turned off at will).

 

Now, should we allow the good MS guys to use our electricity and bandwidth to the scope of delivering more updates or deliver them faster?

Or help two kids chat and have some LOLZ doing their homeworks socially when online through SkyPe? 

 

Are these  "social scope" :w00t: or plain "resource stealing" :ph34r:

 

And in any case, did they ask us for that? :unsure:

 

The whole set "opt out" (as opposed to "opt in") approaches always smell fishy to me, not only these MS examples.

 

jaclaz 


Edited by jaclaz, 27 March 2015 - 11:22 AM.


#410
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dunno if here was mentioned

but they also doing s*** to be able be installed on Android devices

 

Good luck to them on that. Of the three major smartphone UIs (even though calling Metro a "major" phone UI is rather a stretch ;) ), Microsoft's is by far the least visually attractive. You'd have to be married to MSFT to choose that over the Android look.

 

--JorgeA



#411
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Epic comment:

 

... Windows 10 so far is a slight elaboration of Win 8, nothing more. Microsoft is not willing to abandon its silly Win8 experiment and Win10 is simply another way of forcing down our throat the stupid "Metro" idiocy. I understand that Microsoft desperately wants to be a player in the mobile OSes, but this is not the way to do it. It is now trying to use Win10 as a vehicle for its "Universal Apps" but these "Universal Apps" are not really universal because nobody with a sane mind would use them in a desktop environment. These are simple mobile apps.

 

Many companies enter into this group think vision where all kinds of resources are thrown to the pursuit of a market segment. Many end up being destroyed by these pursuits.

 

My prediction of what is going to happen: Microsoft would finally release this mongrel called Win10. A variety of utilities will come out to convert it to something that looks and behaves like Win7. People are going to get the free upgrade and then buy these utilities. Nobody would worry or bother to run these "Universal apps". In fact, I predict that there would be all kinds of programs removing them automatically for a "Metro-free" experience. In the same manner, Windows Phone 10 would not go anywhere.

 

I think that this would be Microsoft's last hurrah in pursuing the mobile OS market. After a while, the company is going to settle in the new reality and maybe, just maybe release a decent desktop OS.

 

 

Yeah, that WAS pretty good! :thumbup

 

Especially loved the line about "this mongrel called Win10." :lol:   The author should participate in our threads here. :yes:

 

--JorgeA



#412
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The whole set "opt out" (as opposed to "opt in") approaches always smell fishy to me, not only these MS examples.

 

jaclaz 

 

Apropos of that...

 

THE TYRANNY OF THE DEFAULT

 

--JorgeA



#413
bpalone

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&nbsp;

There would be those who would say that if everyone refused to be made a full fledged cloud member (i.e., sharing one's resources with the world for their use on demand) that the whole cloud concept wouldn't work.
&nbsp;
I've often wondered...&nbsp; What would be wrong with that?
&nbsp;
Clearly people do not like the ugly truth when it's presented plainly, and probably a lot of them would not choose to share THEIR resources for others' use freely, so Microsoft has to coerce and mislead (or just outright do it with assumed&nbsp;permission) in order to get people to do it.
&nbsp;
There is a TV commercial going on presently here in the US that claims (in a roundabout way) that doctors will only be able to cure cancer if they use the resources of the Microsoft cloud, because the processing needed on computers the doctors themselves could fund would take weeks to do what the cloud could do in minutes.
&nbsp;
Socialized computing.&nbsp; Just what we need to bring everyone down to the same level.
&nbsp;
-Noel

&nbsp;

First thought through my shallow mind was, are we moving from STDs to CTDs?

Sounds like sure fired recipe for a MAJOR security issue. From our computer history, it seems that we as humans seem to lack the ability to test things well enough before we release them and thus have a terrible record as for security. This is all OSes, not just Redmond's beast. The various government spook agencies love the idea though.

#414
JorgeA

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What's a SuperNode?

 

(Forgive my ignorance, I haven't used Skype since it was bought and changed by Microsoft.)

Basically something that betters your experience on the internet ;) making use of your PC and bandwidth for Microsoft use.

http://community.spi...g-for-windows-7

 

jaclaz

 

 

Thanks very mcuh jaclaz, I've applied the Registry tweak. We'll see what (if anything) happens.

 

--JorgeA



#415
JorgeA

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&nbsp;

There would be those who would say that if everyone refused to be made a full fledged cloud member (i.e., sharing one's resources with the world for their use on demand) that the whole cloud concept wouldn't work.
&nbsp;
I've often wondered...&nbsp; What would be wrong with that?
&nbsp;
Clearly people do not like the ugly truth when it's presented plainly, and probably a lot of them would not choose to share THEIR resources for others' use freely, so Microsoft has to coerce and mislead (or just outright do it with assumed&nbsp;permission) in order to get people to do it.
&nbsp;
There is a TV commercial going on presently here in the US that claims (in a roundabout way) that doctors will only be able to cure cancer if they use the resources of the Microsoft cloud, because the processing needed on computers the doctors themselves could fund would take weeks to do what the cloud could do in minutes.
&nbsp;
Socialized computing.&nbsp; Just what we need to bring everyone down to the same level.
&nbsp;
-Noel

&nbsp;

First thought through my shallow mind was, are we moving from STDs to CTDs?

Sounds like sure fired recipe for a MAJOR security issue. From our computer history, it seems that we as humans seem to lack the ability to test things well enough before we release them and thus have a terrible record as for security. This is all OSes, not just Redmond's beast. The various government spook agencies love the idea though.

 

 

Yup, this is really asking for trouble. It's not hard to imagine some future hacker finding a flaw in Skype that, thanks to Microsoft's foray into social computing, will give him control of hundreds of millions of Win10 computers.

 

I'm taking bets on who's going to be the first AV suite to flag Windows as a PUP.  ;)

 

--JorgeA



#416
NoelC

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Don't confuse Skype with the peer to peer Windows Updates.  Imagine the sheer temptation, if you're a malware author...  A Windows Update staged by Microsoft themselves on your very own computer, automatically being fed out to others. 

 

I predict the time for someone to figure out how that's being managed to be measured in mere days.  A way to exploit it is probably already known.

 

-Noel



#417
JorgeA

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Dedoimedo discusses running Classic Shell in Windows 10 and Microsoft's attempts to blacklist this Start Menu alternative.

 

I am not really sure if Microsoft is just playing it silly, or if it's trying to shoot itself in the foot with a 20mm cannon, Classic Shell only mildly notwithstanding. But the thing is, the only really optimal way of using the preview version of Windows 10 Build 9926 is with Classic Shell. And it just might not be installable. Stupid and revolting, and it sure won't please the nerds, who are Microsoft's champions of good will out there.

 

--JorgeA

 



#418
NoelC

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Doesn't anyone think that kind of stuff (and tons more Microsoft is doing) is anti-competitive?

 

I sell my software online.  Not terribly long ago one of my new release installers (and yes, I have a valid code signing certificate) came up in Internet Explorer, courtesy of Smart Screen, with "This kind of file is dangerous and can damage your computer".

 

Is our justice department just a bunch of wusses permanently distracted by their smart phones?

 

-Noel



#419
jaclaz

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Is our justice department just a bunch of wusses permanently distracted by their smart phones?

No. :no:

That was last year, this year they are distracted by their brand new Windows tablets. ;)

:lol:

 

jaclaz



#420
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Windows Hello: Microsoft is making the password obsolete in Windows 10

 

Windows Hello is an authentication system that uses a variety of biometric signatures and combines hardware and software to allow for seamless and secure user recognition and sign-in. According to Microsoft, the ideal scenario here would be for you to simply look or touch a new device running Windows 10 and to be immediately signed up.

 

Windows Hello relies on common hardware, but takes everything to the next level: fingerprint scanners, cameras with infrared sensors and so on. The software analyzes input from such hardware to confirm your identity and then signs you in, without requiring you to remember a password.

 

I'm dubious about replacing biometric data being more secure than passwords. In some respects, probably. But from a legal/judicial standpoint at least, in the U.S. you are more secure from police and perprosecutors with a password than (say) a fingerprint, as you can be compelled to provide a fingerprint but you cannot be forced to provide a password:

 

Judge Steven C. Frucci ruled this week that giving police a fingerprint is akin to providing a DNA or handwriting sample or an actual key, which the law permits. A pass code, though, requires the defendant to divulge knowledge, which the law protects against, according to Frucci's written opinion.

 

"Windows Hello"? Goodbye! :thumbdown

 

--JorgeA

 

 



#421
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A self-proclaimed "avid fan of Windows 8.1" forecasts doom for the major reason Windows 8 was created (putting Windows on mobile devices such as phones):

 

The End of Windows Phone?

 

I don’t own a Windows Phone, and I’ve never really used one for any serious period of time. I did, however, seriously consider buying one for a while--and researched them quite a bit. I also hear, over and over, that Windows Phone really is an amazing operating system. Based upon what I’ve experienced with Windows 8 in tablet form, I’m inclined to believe that Windows Phone would be a truly fantastic operating system. Despite all of this, I can’t help but think that Windows Phone is all but dead.

 

Further analysis at the link...

 

--JorgeA

 



#422
MagicAndre1981

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With Win10 the UI is now a mix of iOS, Android (Hamburger menu) and a bit left from the old WP (but without transparent tiles). I'll only hope they release Win8.1 GDR2 and I will stay on this version. If I want Android, I would buy a Samsung crap device.


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