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Windows 10 - First Impressions


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#1276
JorgeA

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You don't need much fantasy to see a sado-masochist theme going on there. It's no secret that many dominatrix-customers are well-off business people:

 

Wow, that's an intriguing possibility. If there is truth to it, then it must be mainly from the M side of S&M, as there can't possibly be all that many high-powered Windows users to make a viable business model out of abusing your users.

 

http://www.alternet....to_dominatrixes

 

Olivia Severine, a transsexual dominatrix living in San Francisco, says most of her clients were “very high-powered” men weighed down by responsibility. “They came to see me as a brief escape when no one was looking at them for direction or leadership,” she says. “The time with me is when they were told what to do, what to feel and how to act … and all the weight of their careers, families, lives, is lifted from them for a cherished few hours.”

 

[emphasis added]

 

Looks like there's still a chance for me to enter this lucrative line of work...  ;)

 

--JorgeA


Edited by JorgeA, Yesterday, 09:50 AM.



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#1277
JorgeA

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I'll have to check this out on my Win10 test machine, but Neowin reports that Microsoft has relented on the issue of forced Windows Updates:

 

Microsoft releases tool to allow you to block automatic Windows 10 updates

 

A new troubleshooting package, KB3073930, however, allows you to hide or block Windows or driver updates.

 

Maybe what finally pushed them into (maybe) doing the right thing, is the fact that Updates were now affecting even one of Windows's own core functions, Explorer:

 

An update pushed out on Saturday is reportedly causing Explorer to crash and many users are complaining about the latest Windows 10 driver updates from NVIDIA.

 

Betanews gives a few more details about this move by Microsoft. Reading the post and the comments at the bottom, there seems to be less to it than you would think, but at least now maybe there is something, whereas before we definitely had nothing.

 

--JorgeA

 



#1278
modernponderer

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Browsing through an otherwise totally unrelated board, I found this little gem:

 

http://www.digitalho...since-98se.html

 

Is this knowledge slowly spreading to the masses? (And look, it even points out that XP was already on the downhill slope, unlike what many here seem to think...)



#1279
JorgeA

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^^ Nice find, thanks!

 

The views expressed by that "audacity" guy/gal amount to saying that if you're in a jail cell inside a locked fortress, then you have "more control" because you won't get mugged.

 

--JorgeA


Edited by JorgeA, Yesterday, 08:56 PM.


#1280
JorgeA

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I'll have to check this out on my Win10 test machine, but Neowin reports that Microsoft has relented on the issue of forced Windows Updates:

 

Microsoft releases tool to allow you to block automatic Windows 10 updates

 

A new troubleshooting package, KB3073930, however, allows you to hide or block Windows or driver updates.

 

Maybe what finally pushed them into (maybe) doing the right thing, is the fact that Updates were now affecting even one of Windows's own core functions, Explorer:

 

An update pushed out on Saturday is reportedly causing Explorer to crash and many users are complaining about the latest Windows 10 driver updates from NVIDIA.

 

Betanews gives a few more details about this move by Microsoft. Reading the post and the comments at the bottom, there seems to be less to it than you would think, but at least now maybe there is something, whereas before we definitely had nothing.

 

--JorgeA

 

The tool worked. I downloaded and then launched it in Windows 10, and it told me there was a Windows Defender update available, which I was given the choice to hide.

 

--JorgeA



#1281
NoelC

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If a modern version of Windows on a modern gigacomputer would only run, on the average, the number of instructions those old DOS-based Windows systems would run on their megacomputers before crashing or needing a reboot, you'd get at most a few minutes of run time.

 

-Noel


Edited by NoelC, Yesterday, 10:45 PM.


#1282
modernponderer

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I'm assuming you're responding to my post...

 

I agree that 9x was obviously not exactly something to hold up as an example of a great OS line if only because of the stability issues, but did you actually read the topic? It's about features being removed since then, not so much that the Windows versions back then were all that awesome otherwise...



#1283
Formfiller

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Given the progress of Windows 10, here are the probable features of W12:

 

-Built-in hardware-destroyer (CPU & GPU overheater) that activates when you were offline for more than a day. You know, hackers might do funny stuff with your PC otherwise!

-Automatic credit-card charger for the crapstore: It charges 10$ for every day you don't buy something to check whether everything's alright!

-Uploader tool: It automagically uploads your documents to an intelligency agency of your choice, that way bandwidth will be saved.

-Fart app choice screen on every boot-up.


Edited by Formfiller, Today, 02:23 AM.


#1284
jaclaz

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-Uploader tool: It automagically uploads your documents to an intelligency agency of your choice, that way bandwidth will be saved.
 

You got it wrong :w00t::

-Uploader tool: It automagically uploads your documents to an intelligency agency of your their choice, that way bandwidth will be saved.

;)

:lol:

 

jaclaz

 

@all

Let us not mix in the same bag Windows 98/Me with Windows 2K, ok?

http://www.msfn.org/...-ram/?p=1091646

http://www.msfn.org/...-ram/?p=1091652


Edited by jaclaz, Today, 04:35 AM.


#1285
Formfiller

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-Uploader tool: It automagically uploads your documents to an intelligency agency of your choice, that way bandwidth will be saved.
 

You got it wrong :w00t::

-Uploader tool: It automagically uploads your documents to an intelligency agency of your their choice, that way bandwidth will be saved.

 

 

WROOOONG

 

 

[Neowin/Channel9 mode="ON"]

 

Unlike EVIL Google and Apple, Microsoft will offer that choice to the users! See, Microsoft cares. Stop hating and trolling!

 

[Neowin/Channel9 mode="OFF"]



#1286
jaclaz

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I wasn't meaning "them" as the good MS guys (which obviously have the greatest respect for users preferences/choices liar.gif), I was referring to "them" as the intelligence agencies. :whistle:

 

jaclaz



#1287
JorgeA

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Paul Thurrott weighs in, schizophrenically, on forced Windows Updates:

 

Windows 10 and Automatic Updates

 

After lecturing his audience patronizingly about the need to submit to Microsoft's will --

 

I view this like a motorcycle helmet law, in that it’s just regulating common sense. And it’s designed to keep everyone safe, because your insecure PC could infect others.

 

-- he then turns around and informs the reader that, not to worry, Microsoft has made available a tool to hide Updates, with which

 

you can proactively protect yourself from stupidity

 

So, which is it, Paul? Hmm??

 

Incidentally, reading about Windows security patches over the years, it strikes me that a lot of them (I don't have statistics) address problems that were used in literally one or two instances where the perpetrators were going after highly targeted individuals or organizations, whereas the problems caused by patches can affect hundreds of thousands or even millions of users. In any case, many vulnerabilities are plugged up by AV vendors well before Microsoft gets around to issuing the patch; AV companies eagerly tell you how they're protecting you from the latest flaw in Windows. So, bottom line, the philosophy Thurrott advocates puts millions at risk in order to protect a limited set of victims, most of whom will be potected by their security software anyway. How is that a reasonable tradeoff?

 

--JorgeA

 

 



#1288
JorgeA

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Wayne Williams of Betanews follows up on a pro-Win10 post with a new one giving the other side:

 

10 reasons NOT to upgrade to Windows 10

 

There’s Too Much Mobile Influence

 

If you intend to use Windows 10 on a PC, then the mobile elements might grate with you. It’s not going to be as awful as the full screen calculator app on Windows 8, but even so. It’s clearly been designed to run on every kind of device, and some of the design choices look more at home on Windows 10 Mobile than Windows 10 for PCs.

 

Apps

 

The Windows 8 app store is awful, with loads of rubbish knock off apps, and plenty of big names missing. Microsoft is hoping that with Windows 10 this will improve. It’s making it much easy for developers to port over iOS and Android apps, but frankly I prefer to play powerful 3D games on my PC, and leave mobile games to mobile devices. PC programs (or "legacy apps" as Microsoft likes to call them) tend to be much better, and more feature rich because they are designed for the one powerful platform.

Windows 7 Is Still Just as Good -- Or Better

 

Take away the free price and the fact it’s new, and what are you left with? An operating system that rights many of the wrongs of Windows 8, but isn’t massively better, or even in some places even as good, as Windows 7. The truth is Windows 7 is a great OS, and it will take something very special to beat it. Is Windows 10 that OS? A lot of Windows 7 users will say no.

 

Upgrades Will Be Forced on You

 

Yes, this sounds like a good idea, on paper. No more outdated systems at risk out there, and all Windows 10 users running the exact same version of the OS... but what happens if a faulty, problematic update gets pushed out? We've already seen two examples of that here and here. Also, any unwanted new features and changes will be installed whether you want them or not. I think it’s worth waiting to see how things pan out here.

 

--JorgeA

 

 

 



#1289
NoelC

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I'm assuming you're responding to my post...

 

I agree that 9x was obviously not exactly something to hold up as an example of a great OS line if only because of the stability issues, but did you actually read the topic? It's about features being removed since then, not so much that the Windows versions back then were all that awesome otherwise...

 

Yes I read the post.

 

Yes, I know what the point is.  And neither do I like that serious features (Windows 7 Backup, anyone?) are being systematically removed.  But that doesn't mean the functionality is not there.  You just need to know how to get to it.  It's been true all along that 3rd party software is often better than Microsoft's own implementations (Classic Shell, anyone?).

 

As a professional software engineer who uses my systems for highly technical and complex things I can unreservedly say that I get more out of Windows (I'm presently running Win 8.1 x64 Pro/MCE) now than I got back when DOS was still involved.  Way more.

 

Bear in mind that I've been tweaking and augmenting operating systems to get the most they can give going back since well before Windows was even Bill Gates' wet dream.  I'm not even remotely talking about an "out of box" experience nor "technically challenged user" experience.  At the expert level an argument that Win 9x is even remotely in the same league as an NT-based OS is just ludicrous.

 

At the top of the list of things that I clearly remember held me back in "the bad old days":  The inability to trust a computer to just run right for more than a short time and not corrupt data.  The inability to process a LOT of data without some failure.  Having to be distracted by things like de-corrupting disks on bootup, or even just booting up at all.  Dealing with a poor quality display.  Having stuff just degrade for no apparent reason.  And that was with computers 1,000 times less powerful than we enjoy today.

 

Now, even though we do thousands or even millions of times more things, I get my work done and the OS just runs for weeks, stepping out of the way and doing what I need.  I find paying attention to it is FAR less necessary now than ever before once it's set up well.

 

It's not about running the OS.  It's about the system facilitating what you need to get things done.  And for that - for me at least - there's none better than an adeptly configured and augmented Win 8.1 system.  Windows 10 is still too new to fill those shoes, but who knows what it will become?

 

Your mileage may vary.

 

-Noel


Edited by NoelC, Today, 12:04 PM.


#1290
modernponderer

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I'm assuming you're responding to my post...

 

I agree that 9x was obviously not exactly something to hold up as an example of a great OS line if only because of the stability issues, but did you actually read the topic? It's about features being removed since then, not so much that the Windows versions back then were all that awesome otherwise...

 

Yes I read the post.

 

Yes, I know what the point is.  And neither do I like that serious features (Windows 7 Backup, anyone?) are being systematically removed.  But that doesn't mean the functionality is not there.  You just need to know how to get to it.  It's been true all along that 3rd party software is often better than Microsoft's own implementations (Classic Shell, anyone?).

 

As a professional software engineer who uses my systems for highly technical and complex things I can unreservedly say that I get more out of Windows (I'm presently running Win 8.1 x64 Pro/MCE) now than I got back when DOS was still involved.  Way more.

 

Bear in mind that I've been tweaking and augmenting operating systems to get the most they can give going back since well before Windows was even Bill Gates' wet dream.  I'm not even remotely talking about an "out of box" experience nor "technically challenged user" experience.  At the expert level an argument that Win 9x is even remotely in the same league as an NT-based OS is just ludicrous.

 

At the top of the list of things that I clearly remember held me back in "the bad old days":  The inability to trust a computer to just run right for more than a short time and not corrupt data.  The inability to process a LOT of data without some failure.  Having to be distracted by things like de-corrupting disks on bootup, or even just booting up at all.  Dealing with a poor quality display.  Having stuff just degrade for no apparent reason.  And that was with computers 1,000 times less powerful than we enjoy today.

 

Now, even though we do thousands or even millions of times more things, I get my work done and the OS just runs for weeks, stepping out of the way and doing what I need.  I find paying attention to it is FAR less necessary now than ever before once it's set up well.

 

It's not about running the OS.  It's about the system facilitating what you need to get things done.  And for that - for me at least - there's none better than an adeptly configured and augmented Win 8.1 system.  Windows 10 is still too new to fill those shoes, but who knows what it will become?

 

Your mileage may vary.

 

-Noel

 

Okay, but look at Windows 2000. Released in 1999, this OS has basically none of the problems you're describing, yet also virtually none of the degradation issues that XP and later do. It's really such a shame that so much hardware and software simply doesn't support 2000 these days - although I've noticed that even XP support is now being dropped in many cases, and not just by the big names...



#1291
NoelC

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I'm really not trying to be argumentative, but no.  Not saying Win 2000 wasn't good - it was.  But its time came and went.

 

I used Win 2000 for everything it was worth.  Then I used XP, which was better.  Vista as initially released was NOT better.  Then I used Vista after SP2 (I think it was), which was better.  Then I used Win 7, which was better.  Win 8.0 was NOT better.  Then I used Win 8.1, which was better.

 

Only in Vista was I first able to achieve the kind of "runs for weeks without fault" stability that I needed.  All predecessors ground down over time, using up resources, and ultimately starting to get flaky - Win 2000 and XP included.  This was on systems, for example, that were engineering workstations or had no other function than to do software build after software build, or machines in server type roles.

 

I made all these judgments to adopt the newest system with eyes open, by being critical of needs and doing return-on-investment analysis each time, after learning what I could do to tweak and augment each system and whether it would meet my needs and the needs of the engineers in my groups.

 

At this point I rank Win 10 with Win 8.0 and pre-service pack Vista - not yet ready to support serious work.  It has no advantage I can detect over, say, Win 7 or 8.1, but it is not without promise.  Trouble is, Microsoft doesn't really want it to be a General Purpose OS - and THAT's a problem.

 

-Noel


Edited by NoelC, Today, 01:33 PM.





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