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jaclaz

Another reason why the IoT may not be that good an idea ...

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Reminds me of the Michael Hastings case. Maybe Paul Walker too, althouth naysayers would immediately connect the 'Fast & Furious' movie franchise to the event saying he just asked for it.

One of the reasons I would never own or drive a car and as much as possible avoid being a passenger in one.

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This is the reason the "Internet of Things" is doomed to fail. Some things just should not be accessed remotely.

In 10 years or so, when your car's manufacturer changes to the next body-style for a specific model, what happens when they cease to update its remote software? Do they expect people to buy new cars?

I own a 1997 Jeep Wrangler. It has an OBD-II compliant engine control unit, but no wireless capability. I also have a 1965 Mustang--with no computer whatsoever. I'll keep these for as long as I can. They have a huge aftermarket parts supply, and can be rebuilt nearly from scratch out of a catalog. :)

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The internet needs to stay where it belongs, on computers. It does NOT need to be in cars or anything else. No wonder cars are so crappy today, they're so worried about software and whatnot to run their cars that they don't have time to actually focus on quality control or better yet, focus on what people actually want in cars, and what they don't want.

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I know that along with Anti-lock brakes needs to go. Having an computer on board things like cars, is stupid enough. I do not like the idea to have an GPS inside of my car that can track where it has been. I do not like the idea of having an pace-maker that could be controlled wireless. I do not like these things at all and we do not need them. We just need fuel efficient cars that can limit usage of gas and not overheat.

If military tanks can run on water I do not see why can't we make cars that can run on water. Electricity is run through the water separating the molecules, and when the hydrogen is burnt the leftover material is water. It is the greatest idea ever. I mean people are dumb thinking the thing will turn into an bomb because the hydrogen is not separated all at once.

Instead we have dumb helium cars outside right now in the US. While r-tards are making hydrogen stations. Water is everywhere and almost any water from your urine to sea water could create hydrogen cars. A man did it back in 1970's and patents was taken out. The man had no college education at all. Self educated person, with regular grade school education.

Edited by ROTS
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This is the reason the "Internet of Things" is doomed to fail. Some things just should not be accessed remotely.

In 10 years or so, when your car's manufacturer changes to the next body-style for a specific model, what happens when they cease to update its remote software? Do they expect people to buy new cars?

I own a 1997 Jeep Wrangler. It has an OBD-II compliant engine control unit, but no wireless capability. I also have a 1965 Mustang--with no computer whatsoever. I'll keep these for as long as I can. They have a huge aftermarket parts supply, and can be rebuilt nearly from scratch out of a catalog. :)

 

I'm with you. Unfortunately, it may take several high-profile cybersecurity nightmares for the public to sour on the idea of connecting everything they own to the Internet. For the time being, though, the "coolness of it all" factor may have the upper hand.

 

And good point about car software. How long before "if it saves even one life" demagogues will start demanding that people "upgrade" their cars to stay current with the new safety software that's "incompatible" with previous years' models?

 

--JorgeA

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And yet another (though this isn't going to affect the consumer, it is still worth of note):

http://www.eweek.com/security/defcon-hackers-tell-how-they-cracked-brinks-safe-in-60-seconds.html

DefCon Hackers Tell How They Cracked Brink's Safe in 60 Seconds

...

While the DefCon research is specifically about the CompuSafe Galileo, security issues are common across Internet of things connected devices, he said. "Security is a pervasive issue for IoT devices. So here we have a device, a safe, that used to work just fine protecting valuables, but now it is being hooked up to a computer and it opens up an entire set of new problems."

 

jaclaz

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I remember some years ago, watching some presentation of a car show where a car manufacturer was showing off their newest technology. Of them, similar to keyless ignition, was some method of having keyless locks for the car doors. I don't remember exactly what the details were but I do remember, at the time, I thought it was a monumentally bad idea and I would never buy that car.

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Well, that line was drawn a bit earlier, your car either have a remote for unlocking and locking doors or it has them not.

http://jalopnik.com/5736774/how-hackers-can-use-smart-keys-to-steal-cars

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/jul/26/scientist-banned-revealing-codes-cars

http://www.wired.com/2014/08/wireless-car-hack/

 

Not that plain, mechanical locks are any more "difficult" but at least they need the thief to get NEAR the car and fumble with the actual door/lock for a little bit of time, not have all the time needed while staying within a - say - 500 m radius.

 

In any case one thing is the security of the car (being more difficult to be opened/stolen) another is it's actual safety (while you are driving it) :ph34r:.

 

jaclaz

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And yet another reason the Internet of Things is not such a hot idea:

 

The phenomenon, dubbed the "Internet of Things," promises to usher in an era of automated homes outfitted with locks, lights, thermostats, entertainment systems and servants such as the Echo that respond to spoken words.

 

It's also raising the specter of Internet-connected microphones being secretly used as a wiretap, either by a company providing a digital service, government officials with court orders or intruders that seize control of the equipment.

 

A blue light on the Echo also comes on when it's recording and remains illuminated when it's listening. [...]

 

Despite what Amazon says, Steven Combs has noticed the Echo's blue light illuminate at times when it hasn't been asked during the six months he has been using a test version of the device in his Columbus, Indiana, home. [...]

 

--JorgeA

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Some devices already transmit spoken words across the internet. Your TV can spy on you.

Samsung has been accused of playing fast and loose with consumer privacy ever since some users discovered wording in their SmartTVs' privacy policy warning users not to say sensitive things in front of the TV. “To provide you the Voice Recognition feature, some voice commands may be transmitted (along with information about your device, including device identifiers) to a third-party service that converts speech to text or to the extent necessary to provide the Voice Recognition features to you,” the privacy policy states. “Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party through your use of Voice Recognition.”

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I've already read some time ago - can't remember where - reports from people that sniffed the Internet traffic from their Samsung TV and noticed that all the file names contained on a Flash stick connected to that TV unit were being transmitted to certain outside server(s). How about that for a privacy gone out the window?!? What should we do: use arbitrary numeric names for our files and keep a list of them all on devices that have no contact whatsoever with the Internet? Or just dump all the "smart" (way too smart and way too dangerous) devices and start living more sane and live lifes? I know I left my TV set broken a few years ago, pulled out the TV tuner from my computer, my phones still have keys and no internet capability and my refrigerator is about 30 years old and still working with a simple power outlet connection.

 

But keep this in mind y'all: it's not the technology that's bad - it's the people and their (mis)use of it. Especially the people in a position that can take advantage of the capabilites and/or flaws of the technology for their own (obscure) interests which usually are against common people's interests.

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^^ Totally with you on dumping "smart" devices. For the longest time, we used the "dumbest" cell phones we could find. Even today we turn on the smartphone only to make a call or receive an expected call. All right, also when negotiating tricky directions to an unfamiliar place, I do turn on the GPS navigation function.  :)  But once there I turn both it and the phone back off. And we don't have Google accounts that can be associated with any of this.

 

In our household, there is no interest in TVs or DVD/BD players that connect to the Internet.

 

--JorgeA

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Recently I was riding "shotgun" with my ex-girlfriend somewhere out of city. And we got to another city where I happened to spend a couple years of my highschool. Many years went by. Her phone's GPS kept telling us to go right when the only way out was left and so on. Eventually I told her: "look around, use your common-sense and we'll find our way out". And so we did.

 

GPS was trying to kill us both. People should stop trusting those tools because they may just end up in the wrong place, to say the least.

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I never use GPS. When I had rental/loaner cars with those things I would tape a piece of paper over the display because it was too distracting. I still keep paper maps in my car for areas that I travel often. When I go to new areas, I will try to find a paper map. If it is not found, I will look at the area map in a phone book, such as if I am in a hotel. Worst case scenario, I will actually TALK TO ANOTHER PERSON to get directions.

GPS sounds great but when it tells you that you are driving in the Atlantic Ocean there is a problem.

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