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Driver packs from DriverPacks.net in a customized WinXP cd

15 posts in this topic

Hi folks!

 

Many people suggest to include at least Chipset, Mass storage, CPU, LAN and WLAN packs in a customized installation cd of WinXP.

Firstly, WLAN pack in Driverpacks website is almost 30 MB, instead nLite shows a 1 MB pack (from WinXP SP3). Can I just keep the last one (for cd space reasons)? Will I face incompatibility's problems with the latest PCs in this case?

Secondly, DriverPacks provides about 12 MB of LAN and LAN-RIS drivers, while nLite shows 1,84 MB of LAN drivers. What if I keep the 1,84 MB of LAN drivers and then integrate the 12 MB packs? Will 1,84 MB be overwritten by the 12 MB packs? Or, more simply, do the 12 MB packs already include the older 1,84 MB pack (so I can safely remove the 1,84 MB)?

 

Apart from the above mentioned driver packs, there are quite heavy driver packs on DriverPacks website. I don't think those packs are suitable for a 700MB cd with WinXP SP3, updates (including POS ready ones), hardware drivers and software (scanner, printers, internet keys, etc.).

But as far as you know, would I need other driver packs if I wanted my WinXP correctly running on almost all the latest computers' hardware?

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Earlier(before 10 Years) it is hard to have a DVD-ROM at everyplace but now a days it is hard to find a CD-Writer so you can upgrade to DVD if space matters.

 

As you talking about Latest Hardware most of them cant be able to install XP (clearly i cant confirm because i stopped using XP after Windows 7) even then it is better to Installing Operating System from USB is nice for that situations.  You can easily modify(update) the files when ever you want.

 

As of my experience i just created AIO DVD with all driver packs integrated with Windows XP (Last used before 7-8 years i think).

 

Sometimes nothing works exactly what we think.  Building CD/DVD as per our preferences is good.

 

About nlite i used it but dont remember about that now, as i think(may not correct also) those small MB of drivers is already integrated with Operating System Disc

Edited by kmaheshkumar
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Closely related topic by you. One was enough.

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/175079-windows-xp-pro-sp3-drivers-to-remove-and-keep/

 

Seems you want to remove some but add some others. In addition to adding Post-Install Software.

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/174919-applications-to-remove-and-replace-with-addons/

 

On that note, I'll agree - go with a DVD if this is for "newer hardare".

Be aware that "newest hardware" may or may not work for XP.

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Thanks for your replies!

My intention is just to create an installation cd suitable for latest and oldest computers (from 2004 like mine).

In the latest machines I could run WinXP simply via Virtual Box: it's convenient in order to avoid rebooting PC (because of using another partition with WinXP). RAM is quite abundant nowadays, so Virtual Box (or similar) can easily manage this task.

My preference for CD comes from the incompatibility with USB installation (old motherboards, like mine, don't support it) and even from lack of DVD writer (or its malfunction).

My questions were related to computer's components, more than peripherals (printers, scanners, etc.). I mean HD, CPU, GPU and so on. And I heard that Chipset, Mass Storage (for SATA HD), CPU, LAN and WLAN driver packs are enough to successfully install WinXP on many of the newest machines (in a dedicated partition or even via Virtual Box).

You know it's time consuming to create a customized installation disc so I'd like to create just one 700 MB disc. After all, WinXP is very slim and it shouldn't be so difficult to keep it under 700 MB (including updates, hotfixes, peripherals' drivers and software and some utilities, the so called "addons").

But I need to know what is superfluous and completely unuseful and what should instead be kept. That's why I posted these messages and I hope I'll manage to create my slim installation disc with your precious support.

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Just for reference, it is possible to integrate a lot of drivers and stuff and keep Windows XP install source under 700 MB.

 

My Windows XP SP3 I386 source folder after integrating the latest updates is about 470 MB. This includes Internet Explorer 8 and Windows Media Player 11, the latest MassStorage Drivers 14.11.191, Ricks/YumeYao's Runtime Addon 2.2.3, Ricktendo and YumeYao's Common Printer Drivers and XPS Addon, User-Mode Driver Framework version 1.9 and more. To keep the size small I have removed a lot of legacy drivers. Remind you this is about drivers for very old hardware, released before 2001.

 

This results in a driver.cab file of only 19 MB.

 

Other things I have removed are Microsoft Netmeeting and MSN Explorer.

 

My complete CD is around 500 MB now (including DOCS, SUPPORT and ValueADD) excluding the OEM folder. I have kept the LANG folder though and not removed any critical files or services.

 

So you then have about 200 MB for Driver Packs. This allows integrating Chipset, Massstorage complete support, LAN and WAN drivers. The Sound driver pack is very big. I suggest to not bother integrating these, but install the sound drivers manually.

 

If you need help removing specific stuff you can contact me.

 

I also removed OOBE and OEMBIOS.BIN files, but I can not discuss removing that here.

 

About integrating additional software and stuff. This is also possible on a CD after integrating DriverPacks, but to accomplish this you will have to remove some Windows XP components that can affect the functionality. I do not recommend this, and instead I strongly recommend to use a secondary CD for these or better move to using DVD's as you won't have this problem and as a bonus have better read disc performance (I'm not really sure about this last statement, but I think so as DVD discs have a higher data density).

 

Currently my Unattended install folder contains about 1 GB of files of which the following are big:

 

Adobe Flash Player plugins for ActiveX and Firefox: 36 MB

Adobe Reader 11.0.14: 74 MB

LibreOffice 5.0.4 and latest help files: 217 MB

Microsoft Security Essentials including the latest security definitions: 127 MB

Microsoft .NET 2.0, 3.5SP1 and 4.0 and localized files: 104 MB

Mozilla Firefox 43.0.4 including addons, custom themes and more: 60 MB

Mozilla Thunderbird 38.5.1 including addons: 36 MB

Nero 8 Lite: 32 MB

Oracle Java JRE 8.0 update 72: 47 MB

 

Using a DVD I don't have to worry of running out of available disc space, when integrating newer versions of these software packages.

Edited by Acheron
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Just for reference, it is possible to integrate a lot of drivers and stuff and keep Windows XP install source under 700 MB.

 

My Windows XP SP3 I386 source folder after integrating the latest updates is about 470 MB. This includes Internet Explorer 8 and Windows Media Player 11, the latest MassStorage Drivers 14.11.191, Ricks/YumeYao's Runtime Addon 2.2.3, Ricktendo and YumeYao's Common Printer Drivers and XPS Addon, User-Mode Driver Framework version 1.9 and more. To keep the size small I have removed a lot of legacy drivers. Remind you this is about drivers for very old hardware, released before 2001.

 

This results in a driver.cab file of only 19 MB.

 

Other things I have removed are Microsoft Netmeeting and MSN Explorer.

 

My complete CD is around 500 MB now (including DOCS, SUPPORT and ValueADD) excluding the OEM folder. I have kept the LANG folder though and not removed any critical files or services.

 

So you then have about 200 MB for Driver Packs. This allows integrating Chipset, Massstorage complete support, LAN and WAN drivers. The Sound driver pack is very big. I suggest to not bother integrating these, but install the sound drivers manually.

 

If you need help removing specific stuff you can contact me.

 

I also removed OOBE and OEMBIOS.BIN files, but I can not discuss removing that here.

 

About integrating additional software and stuff. This is also possible on a CD after integrating DriverPacks, but to accomplish this you will have to remove some Windows XP components that can affect the functionality. I do not recommend this, and instead I strongly recommend to use a secondary CD for these or better move to using DVD's as you won't have this problem and as a bonus have better read disc performance (I'm not really sure about this last statement, but I think so as DVD discs have a higher data density).

 

Currently my Unattended install folder contains about 1 GB of files of which the following are big:

 

Adobe Flash Player plugins for ActiveX and Firefox: 36 MB

Adobe Reader 11.0.14: 74 MB

LibreOffice 5.0.4 and latest help files: 217 MB

Microsoft Security Essentials including the latest security definitions: 127 MB

Microsoft .NET 2.0, 3.5SP1 and 4.0 and localized files: 104 MB

Mozilla Firefox 43.0.4 including addons, custom themes and more: 60 MB

Mozilla Thunderbird 38.5.1 including addons: 36 MB

Nero 8 Lite: 32 MB

Oracle Java JRE 8.0 update 72: 47 MB

 

Using a DVD I don't have to worry of running out of available disc space, when integrating newer versions of these software packages.

Excellent help, Acheron! Thanks for your useful suggestions!

I've just checked the last version of MassStorage Driver Pack from http://driverpacks.net/downloads and it seems that this file is the most up-to-date: DP_MassStorage_wnt5_x86-32_1209.7z

But you wrote "the latest MassStorage Drivers 14.11.191". Did you find them on driverpacks.net or somewhere else?

 

Glad to know that I should have 200 MB left for integrating drivers! So I won't have any space problem if I integrate CPU, Chipset, MassStorage, LAN and WAN drivers. For these last 2 packs, would you recommend to firstly remove the ones coming from the XP SP3 I386 folder (less than 3 MB as nLite indicates), before integrating LAN and WAN packs from driverpacks.net?

 

You said you had removed a lot of legacy drivers. Actually, I wish to remove many legacy drivers as well: "Cameras and Camcorders", "IBM PS/2 TrackPoint", "IBM ThinkPad", "Logitech Wingman", "Microsoft SideWinder", "Printers" (nLite suggests to keep just a specific file needed for PDF printers, do you know its name?), "Scanners", "Sony Jog Dial", "Toshiba DVD decoder card". Do you have a similar list of removed drivers?

But I wish to keep other ones: "ATM", "Display Adapters", "Multifunctional", "Portable Audio", "SCSI/RAID", "Serial Pen Tablet", "Sound Controllers" and "Tape Drives". These all count just about 5 MB. Would you instead remove some of them? Why?

 

Finally, would you even remove "ISDN" and "Modems" drivers? They count more than 15 MB but I'd like to keep them. After all, I have a 56k modem integrated in my old laptop that I can use in particular but possible occasions (with router and ADSL modem out of order).

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I'm thinking he means from the Full Package (all of them), not just (only) Mass Storage Drivers. :unsure:

In any case, just get what you need.

 

HTH

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Just for reference, it is possible to integrate a lot of drivers and stuff and keep Windows XP install source under 700 MB.

 

My Windows XP SP3 I386 source folder after integrating the latest updates is about 470 MB. This includes Internet Explorer 8 and Windows Media Player 11, the latest MassStorage Drivers 14.11.191, Ricks/YumeYao's Runtime Addon 2.2.3, Ricktendo and YumeYao's Common Printer Drivers and XPS Addon, User-Mode Driver Framework version 1.9 and more. To keep the size small I have removed a lot of legacy drivers. Remind you this is about drivers for very old hardware, released before 2001.

 

This results in a driver.cab file of only 19 MB.

 

Other things I have removed are Microsoft Netmeeting and MSN Explorer.

 

My complete CD is around 500 MB now (including DOCS, SUPPORT and ValueADD) excluding the OEM folder. I have kept the LANG folder though and not removed any critical files or services.

 

So you then have about 200 MB for Driver Packs. This allows integrating Chipset, Massstorage complete support, LAN and WAN drivers. The Sound driver pack is very big. I suggest to not bother integrating these, but install the sound drivers manually.

 

If you need help removing specific stuff you can contact me.

 

I also removed OOBE and OEMBIOS.BIN files, but I can not discuss removing that here.

 

About integrating additional software and stuff. This is also possible on a CD after integrating DriverPacks, but to accomplish this you will have to remove some Windows XP components that can affect the functionality. I do not recommend this, and instead I strongly recommend to use a secondary CD for these or better move to using DVD's as you won't have this problem and as a bonus have better read disc performance (I'm not really sure about this last statement, but I think so as DVD discs have a higher data density).

 

Currently my Unattended install folder contains about 1 GB of files of which the following are big:

 

Adobe Flash Player plugins for ActiveX and Firefox: 36 MB

Adobe Reader 11.0.14: 74 MB

LibreOffice 5.0.4 and latest help files: 217 MB

Microsoft Security Essentials including the latest security definitions: 127 MB

Microsoft .NET 2.0, 3.5SP1 and 4.0 and localized files: 104 MB

Mozilla Firefox 43.0.4 including addons, custom themes and more: 60 MB

Mozilla Thunderbird 38.5.1 including addons: 36 MB

Nero 8 Lite: 32 MB

Oracle Java JRE 8.0 update 72: 47 MB

 

Using a DVD I don't have to worry of running out of available disc space, when integrating newer versions of these software packages.

Excellent help, Acheron! Thanks for your useful suggestions!

I've just checked the last version of MassStorage Driver Pack from http://driverpacks.net/downloads and it seems that this file is the most up-to-date: DP_MassStorage_wnt5_x86-32_1209.7z

But you wrote "the latest MassStorage Drivers 14.11.191". Did you find them on driverpacks.net or somewhere else?

 

Glad to know that I should have 200 MB left for integrating drivers! So I won't have any space problem if I integrate CPU, Chipset, MassStorage, LAN and WAN drivers. For these last 2 packs, would you recommend to firstly remove the ones coming from the XP SP3 I386 folder (less than 3 MB as nLite indicates), before integrating LAN and WAN packs from driverpacks.net?

 

You said you had removed a lot of legacy drivers. Actually, I wish to remove many legacy drivers as well: "Cameras and Camcorders", "IBM PS/2 TrackPoint", "IBM ThinkPad", "Logitech Wingman", "Microsoft SideWinder", "Printers" (nLite suggests to keep just a specific file needed for PDF printers, do you know its name?), "Scanners", "Sony Jog Dial", "Toshiba DVD decoder card". Do you have a similar list of removed drivers?

But I wish to keep other ones: "ATM", "Display Adapters", "Multifunctional", "Portable Audio", "SCSI/RAID", "Serial Pen Tablet", "Sound Controllers" and "Tape Drives". These all count just about 5 MB. Would you instead remove some of them? Why?

 

Finally, would you even remove "ISDN" and "Modems" drivers? They count more than 15 MB but I'd like to keep them. After all, I have a 56k modem integrated in my old laptop that I can use in particular but possible occasions (with router and ADSL modem out of order).

 

 

You can download the latest driver packs for Windows XP on the driverpacks forum here:

 

http://forum.driverpacks.net/viewtopic.php?id=6622

 

There are multiple threads for Windows XP. I would recommend to only use these, as the regular driver packs are not updated anymore. These nightlies are actively maintained by TechDud.

 

I haven't used a dial-up modem in a long time, but you should be able to remove the legacy modem drivers using nLite and still keep dialup support. I have the option to install a dialup modem still available. Most 'modern' modems built into laptops use the standard dialup modem driver.

I also remember ISDN. ISDN was a newer DSL technique with better speed 64kbps instead of 56kbps. You have to look up if your current dial-up connection is 56k6 or 64kbps.

 

Here in the Netherlands you can still use a ISDN connection, but all major ISPs are switching from ISDN to VDSL. If your current ISP connection is not over ISDN you can remove ISDN support.

 

I did ran into a problem using the software for my old Nokia when I removed the legacy modem drivers. You need to add mdmcpq.inf to the nLite exclude list to prevent issues with USB modem drivers:

 

KB837637 - How to use or to reference the Usbser.sys driver from universal serial bus (USB) modem .inf files

 

I removed IBM Thinkpad drivers, IBM PS/2 trackpoint driver, legacy display drivers, old Terminal Services Client, old Terminal Server Client for the Handheld PC, Toshiba DVD decoder card driver, legacy printer drivers, legacy scanner drivers, legacy multifunctional drivers, MSN Network HTTP authentication, old camera and camcorder drivers, portable audio drivers, Windows TabletPC and Windows MediaCenter references, old Network Monitor driver.

 

I did keep the Sony Jogdial support. This driver is not available online and you may run into issues when installing Windows XP on some old Sony laptop.

 

To further save space I removed Windows upgrade support. You should be able to remove everything from the I386\WINNTUPG directory except NETMAP.INF and NETUPGRD.DLL

 

You can also remove I386\WIN9XMIG and I386\WIN9XUPG folders safely and still keep recovery console support working.

 

Manual Install and Upgrade should also be functional, (starting Windows XP setup from within Windows).

 

I have not documented my XP reducing techniques in detail. My general procedure was to remove a specific component with nLite. Then manually revert any changes I didn't want, like the white space and comment removal changes applied by nLite, the nLite helper app added, etc... and then use the latest DriverPacks Base version to integrate the latest drivers. After running DriverPacks Base I did the same, removing any changes I didn't like. I integrated Ricktendo and YumeYao's Common Printer Drivers and XPS Addon 1.2.3 after removing the Printer drivers by nLite to keep printer support.

 

If you want to know which specific printer drivers I removed please send me a PM. If I load my current Windows XP Source in nLite I can still select Printers to remove as an option, file size 33.74 MB.

 

To keep track of everything I use version control.

 

I found a Printer driver keep list in my project reference folder that I probably used:

 

printer driver keep list.txt

locale.gpdp6disp.gpdp6font.gpdpcl4res.dllpcl5eres.dllpcl5ures.dllpclxl.dllpclxl.gpdpjl.gpdpscript5.dllpscript.hlppscript.ntfstdnames.gpdstdschem.gdlstdschmx.gdlttfsub.gpdunidrv.dllunidrv.hlpunidrvui.dllunires.dllpjlmon.dllremove the following:plotui.hlpplotui.dllplotter.dll

I am not sure if you can safely remove the MassStorage drivers, LAN and WAN drivers first using nLite, before integrating the latest driver packs.

The driverpacks do not include any drivers that are installed by default on Windows.

When you integrate the latest DriverPacks it should include updated drivers for most hardware. In case there was never made an update to the original driver included with Windows XP you can run into some issues.

I was thinking of updating the DriverPacks to add support for these legacy hardware so it wouldn't matter if integrating DriverPacks on a nLited source.

Edited by Acheron
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Thanks for all the tips, Acheron!

I've had a look at driverpacks forum and I think I'll include these particular packs:

DP_MassStorage_wnt5_x86-32_1412115.7z (10.5 MB)

DP_MassStorage-Utils_wnt5_x86-32_1411021.7z (573.02 KB)

DP_Chipset_wnt5_x86-32_1412311.7z (4.43 MB)

DP_WLAN_wnt5_x86-32_1501231.7z (23.78 MB)

DP_LAN_wnt5_x86-32_1412311.7z (12.26 MB)

DP_LAN-Utils_wnt5_x86-32_1412221.7z (15.94 MB)

DP_LAN_USB_wnt5_x86-32_1412241.7z (6.29 MB)

In addition, always using driverpacks Base, I'll put the 32bit Intel MSM textmode driver (mod+signed by Fernando) in the 3rd party driver folder. This is to avoid the risk of a BSOD when I get my XP installed via VirtualBox (http://www.win-raid.com/t22f23-Guide-Integration-of-Intels-AHCI-RAID-drivers-into-a-Windows-XP-W-k-W-k-CD.html).

As you clearly pointed out, it's better not to remove the original LAN and WAN driver packs because the latest ones from driverpacks website don't include any default XP driver but just updates.

Precious information your printer driver keep list (containing even 3 files to remove): I'm gonna copy and paste it in nLite!

But you wrote that you integrated Ricktendo and YumeYao's Common Printer Drivers and XPS Addon 1.2.3 after removing the Printer drivers by nLite to keep printer support. My intention is to only integrate the drivers of my current printers. After having done this and removed default printer drivers (saving your keep list), do I still need to integrate the drivers and addons you integrated (Ricktendo, YumeYao, XPS addon 1.2.3) in order to keep printer support?

As far as ISDN and modem drivers are concerned, I'm gonna keep both of them.

I could need ISDN support somewhere despite the fact that my current ISP provides DSL services.

Since I don't want to run into issues by removing legacy modem drivers (as you said it happened to you with your old Nokia), I keep the default modem drivers: along with the ISDN ones they are just about 15 MB.

Following your suggestions, I'll remove the drivers you mentioned (keeping Sony Jogdial support, just in case...).

As far as windows upgrade support is concerned, does its removal affect windows updates service? I still receive automatic updates (the POS ready ones) and so far I've never experienced any issue regarding OS instability. That's why I prefer to keep the automatic updates.

You then mentioned the recovery console support. As far as you know, is there an addon to get this recovery console installed with XP without the need to manually install it lately?

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I think you should be fine using these latest packs. If you use these you don't need to add DriverPacks CPU, as these are now part of DriverPack Chipset. Ignore the warning about the missing Driver Pack when using DriverPack Base.

I think you should look at your current modem connection. In almost any case the dialup modems in newer laptops are using the default Windows XP dialup modem driver. In very rare cases the manufacturer would probably have included a cd with modem drivers. These would probably be much newer than the ones from 2001.
When removing the Modem drivers using nLite it will keep the default driver for compatibility.
The only issue I ran into was about part of the Nokia Modem connection not working correctly without mdmcpq.inf.

You only need to add this file to the nLite exclusion list and you should be fine removing all the modem drivers. They take up a lot of space and slow down Windows XP setup.

You asked about removing the default printer drivers. These take up a lot of space. If you want to keep PDF printer support you have to add the files to the nLite exception list when removing the Printer Drivers.
You should run nLite multiple times, as removing components and integrating addons in the same run is asking for trouble.

The Ricktendo and YumeYao common printer driver pack contain the latest printer drivers. Probably your new printer also requires these files.
Most of the files included in this pack update the same files as on the exception list.
It will only increase the size of your I386 slightly, but it is still a lot smaller than when you keep all legacy printer drivers.

About ISDN. I would still check if any of the ISPs on Malta have implemented ISDN connections. You probably don't need it.

 

Here is some information from a Maltese ISP mentioning ISDN:

 

http://www.ozone.com.mt/services/telephony/post-paid.aspx

 

It mentions "SIP trunking" to replace "legacy" ISDN connections. So I don't think ISP's will offer new ISDN connections to customers, as this technology will be fully replaced by VDSL within 1-2 years at most.

About Windows Upgrade support. You can safely remove these folders. It only disables upgrading from Windows 98 or Windows 2000. You should still be able to run a upgrade install from an older version of Windows XP to your version, but you should generally avoid this at all costs, as a fresh install is the better solution.

 

It has no effect on Windows Update support.

 

Do not confuse this manual directory delete process with the Manual Install and Upgrade option offered by nLite. Using the Nlite option will remove winnt32.exe and additional setup files as well, not only removing upgrade support but also the ability to install the recovery console. If you don't want to install the recovery console ever you can select this option to save some space, but I do not recommend it.

 

Instead I recommend removing the legacy modem drivers, legacy isdn support and drivers, legacy printer drivers and replacing them with the latest common printer drivers without any general reduce in functionality.

 

About installing recovery console during setup I have the following lines in my SVCPACK.INF file
 

[SetupHotfixesToRun]"..\winnt32.exe /cmdcons /dudisable /unattend"

HFSLIP has an option to install the recovery console through the ANSWERFILE options.

Edited by Acheron
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Thanks again, Acheron!

I'll follow your clear and useful recommendations: out legacy modem drivers (adding mdmcpq.inf to the exclusion list), legacy isdn support and drivers, legacy printer drivers (using your printer driver keep list) and Windows upgrade support.

I'll avoid CPU Driverpack, along with the ones too heavy (Sound and Graphics above all).

 

As far as the recovery console is concerned, I was wondering where the SVCPACK:INF file is.

In i386 folder? Perhaps SVCPACK.IN_?

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I have replaced svcpack.in_ with an uncompressed svcpack.inf for easier version control. If you replace the svcpack.in_ with the uncompressed one you need to delete svcpack.in_ from the SOURCE folder.

 

I don't know how much room you will have left over. Instead of integrating all the DriverPacks you could also add a folder with for example the latest NVIDIA drivers for your card or the standard Realtek Sound Driver installer, or the sound driver installer for your sound card. I chose to remove as much as possible to speed up the installation phase of Windows XP.

 

It is too much of a hassle to generally support all graphics and sound cards. You can always download them later.

 

I also recommended removing MSN Explorer, MSN Messenger and Netmeeting.

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I have replaced svcpack.in_ with an uncompressed svcpack.inf for easier version control. If you replace the svcpack.in_ with the uncompressed one you need to delete svcpack.in_ from the SOURCE folder.

 

 

Hi Acheron!

I was wondering whether svcpack.inf is created by nLite (or RVMI) or must be manually created and modified, inserting all the content of svcpack folder (in my case, about 180 items!) and other information line by line.

I tried to open svcpack.in_ with notepad but there is no readable line.

Is there a way to avoid typing all manually in this svcpack.inf?

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Posted (edited)

You could try to expand these compressed files using the expand -r command to see the contents, or with the use of some 3rd party software like for example Universal Extractor.

 

I have created a custom installer for Universal Extractor you can download from my website:

 

http://updatepack.nl/custom_setup/

 

I have not tested nLite if it supports updating uncompressed svcpack.inf. I remember it did process these files, but recompresses them again. This makes it hard to compare changes when using version control.

 

HFSLIP 1.7.10 beta K enables processing uncompressed svcpack.inf and sysoc.inf files and does not recompress them to workaround these issues.

Edited by Acheron
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Thanks for having shared the link to Universal Extractor installer, Acheron!

Just downloaded and installed. Then in a few seconds I created a folder with svcpack.inf and added the line to install the recovery console during setup. I hope this will work.

 

I have not tested nLite if it supports updating uncompressed svcpack.inf. I remember it did process these files, but recompresses them again. This makes it hard to compare changes when using version control.

Do you know whether RVMI doesn't recompress svcpack.inf file?

If not, could HFSLIP (last version) be the best solution to overcome the recompression issues?

Does it still work only with the English version of Windows?

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