maximus-decim

Maximus-Decim Native USB Drivers

804 posts in this topic

Actually it is not even a PS/2 keyboard, it's older than PS/2 and is connected through the adapter, which is a bit heavy. I suspect that is the reason why the port is cranky.

That's typical of the old DIN connector:

http://pinouts.ru/Inputs/KeyboardPC5_pinout.shtml

Since the plug is "huge" it is likely that by accident some extra force is applied to it.

This will usually crack the soldering to the motherboard.

Get a soldering iron and re-heat/re-solder the connector solderings to the motherboard, it will last for another ten years....

jaclaz

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I have a question about using NUSB with a BlackBerry.

I tried this and it does let me access the micro SD card in my BB as a disk drive. (It doesn't support the BB completely, but I didn't expect that. I just want easy access to the micro SD card.) Trouble is, I can only read from the BB - I can't write to it. If I try I get a blue screen saying "Cannot write to E:".

This doesn't happen with other USB drives (memory sticks, etc.). Does anyone know of a way to fix this so I can write to the BB?

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Post a photo (easier) or a screenshot (harder... can it be done?) of the BSOD or copy its text *in full* and post it here. Without all the info available, it's hard to say anything.

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NUSB and USB Stack 2.0 was able to detect my usb microSD adapter. Thanks

My microSD is only 1 gig should I convert it to fat32 or leave it at fat16?

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If you intend to cram it to the brim with small datafiles or applications, FAT-32 is the way to go.

If not, it's not worth the effort. Moreover, if you use the micro-SD also in a camera, mobile phone or any other such device, you've got to check first whether all the devices you use it with support FAT-32, because some do require FAT-16 (if you thin that's odd, then what about older cameras that are known to require FAT-12 exclusively?). So consider all factors before reformatting.

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If you intend to cram it to the brim with small datafiles or applications, FAT-32 is the way to go.

If not, it's not worth the effort. Moreover, if you use the micro-SD also in a camera, mobile phone or any other such device, you've got to check first whether all the devices you use it with support FAT-32, because some do require FAT-16 (if you thin that's odd, then what about older cameras that are known to require FAT-12 exclusively?). So consider all factors before reformatting.

Well, this is the thing, I bought a DS Iplayer and I'm going to store it with Avi and mp3s. I got it yesterday from China, which shipped like in 8 days. Its supports fat16\32.The microSD card is from my girlfriend phone. Its fat16 so I read somewhere saying that I should use fat32 because of the large movie files. I plan on getting a 32gb SDHC card.

So before I format her card, until i get mine, I would like to know the way to go. Thanks everybody, and thank you china for the DS Iplayer.

Edited by PROBLEMCHYLD
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Just a warning, I installed the nusb22e.exe on my win98se machine and was not able to boot up after. first I got a message saying IOS.vxd in "C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM\VMM32" was corrupted or missing. Went into safe mode and after searching found that there were 3 instantces of IOS.vxd so I copied one of these extra IOS.vxd's and replaced the 'corrupted" one and rebooted. This stopped the bad IOS.vxd message but still no joy as it would just hang and never reach the desktop screen. Going back into safemode I saw in my 'system' that there was now an "unknown device" where there had'nt been before I ran this program. Tried disabling and even deleting it but I still can'nt boot up fully. Luckily I keep a spare HD with my OS on it which is what I'm useing now but unless I can figure it out I fear I will have to do a full ghost copy of this drive to get the other functioning. I can't say why this happened to me but be careful. What I can tell you is after searching for IOS.vxd on this extra HD I could only find the one instance in "VMM32" so it would seem this program probably creates/manipulates that file.

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Post a photo (easier) or a screenshot (harder... can it be done?) of the BSOD or copy its text *in full* and post it here. Without all the info available, it's hard to say anything.

OK. First, here's a screenshot of a 4DOS session showing me about to copy a file to the BlackBerry. (Same problem happens with, say, Windows drag & drop, but it's easier to show what I'm doing this way.)

post-283483-128224899122_thumb.jpg

Edited by Mathwiz
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Post a photo (easier) or a screenshot (harder... can it be done?) of the BSOD or copy its text *in full* and post it here. Without all the info available, it's hard to say anything.

And when I press Enter, here's a (blurry but legible) pic of the BSOD.

When I "press any key," the desktop reappears but Windows is locked up.

post-283483-12822491558_thumb.jpg

Edited by Mathwiz
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Are you using NUSB 3.3? If not, update to it (just install the newer one over the older). What is the VIP and PID of the BlackBerry?

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Are you using NUSB 3.3? If not, update to it (just install the newer one over the older).

Yes, it's version 3.3 (the latest).

What is the VIP and PID of the BlackBerry?

Sorry, but I'm a bit ignorant about USB. How do I determine these?

Wait: I found the following registry key on my XP machine:

My Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\USB\Vid_0fca&Pid_0004&MI_01\6&1b9c87ee&0&0001

The description in the registry is USB Mass Storage Device. So if I'm reading that right, the VID is 0FCA and the PID is 0004.

One problem might be that the BB is a composite device. Is that what the &MI_01 is for? There's another key with &MI_00 which I assume is the other device (that I don't expect to work on Win98SE).

Edited by Mathwiz
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Use Microsoft's own USBView (v. 5.1.2600.2180, from Win 2k DDK) works under Win 9X and provides useful information about the USB ports in a computer and the devices therein attached. Note that VID = Vendor Id and PID = Product Id. Note also that USBView will give you a duplicate entry for each of your physical USB connectors since it sees each as both a USB 1.1 and a USB 2.0 connectors, which it lists under the appropriate controller. Since your device is 2.0, it should be one of the entries under the EHCI (Enhanced Host Controller Interface = USB 2.0), OK?

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Use Microsoft's own USBView (v. 5.1.2600.2180, from Win 2k DDK) works under Win 9X and provides useful information about the USB ports in a computer and the devices therein attached. Note that VID = Vendor Id and PID = Product Id. Note also that USBView will give you a duplicate entry for each of your physical USB connectors since it sees each as both a USB 1.1 and a USB 2.0 connectors, which it lists under the appropriate controller. Since your device is 2.0, it should be one of the entries under the EHCI (Enhanced Host Controller Interface = USB 2.0), OK?

Copied from the USBView screen on my Win98SE machine with the BB attached:

idVendor: 0x0FCA (Research In Motion, Ltd.)

idProduct: 0x0004

This matches the registry key from the XP machine.

I have NUSB 3.3 installed, but not the USB 2.0 stack.

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