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FaceMouth

Repair scratched CD

51 posts in this topic

My cousin told me to do this, but my cd got fully erased after i tried the toothpaste trick. It was probably the kind of toothpaste i was using, and i was quite careless too. So remember folks! BE GENTLE!!!

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@digiratiprime - Wow... that looks like a very very handy piece of software... *downloads*

Thanks! :thumbup

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Ditto as above.

Nice find!

jaclaz

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Be careful with extremely badly scratched discs, as in the high speed of rotation of most drives today (7000+ RPM) deep scratches can cause stress cracks and cause the disk to shatter under the force of the rotation.

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DigeratiPrime, awesome software!!! Thanks a lot.

Edited by bms
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I've been gone for quite a while and it's good to be back here. I've just been doing other stuff that takes up a lot of my time. I got another scratch removing tip, but BE WARNED, I'm not sure if it will work with cd's.

You can use furniture polish to fix scratches in glass, I used it on my glasses. Maybe someone less lazy than me can do a bit of research and see if it will work for discs. If I get time I'll look it up, but there just aren't enough hours in a day

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I would not recomend using gel toothpaste! The abbrasive in it is much coarser than in regular toothpaste.

Breathing on a disc deposits halitosis and water (in a small quantity). The amount of water shouldn't do any damage but the halitosis could peel the information layer off. Check first by breathing on wallpaper. If it peels, then use the toothpaste, gel or regular, on your teeth. Then breath on the disk.

DL

Ummm... dude? If your breath can peel wallpaper, you've got WAAAAAY bigger problems than a few scratched CDs :P :P :P

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use unstoppable copier with log mode enabled, then ask on here for the files that don't copy :)

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Plastic polish works good, just use a circular motion when applying let dry to a haze remove excess with a circular motion, Then make a backup copy.

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Plastic polish works good, just use a circular motion when applying let dry to a haze remove excess with a circular motion, Then make a backup copy.

Actually it is better to always apply polish radially, i.e. at 90 degrees to the "grooves", at least in final steps.

Any mark that is radial or however not tangential to the groove tends to be interpreted correctly by the reader while marks and scratches in the same or near to same direction of th grooves tend to cause mis-readings.

http://www.mcgee-flutes.com/scratches.html

a scratch which runs at an angle to the track usually poses no problem for the tracking mechanism. Indeed a well adjusted CD player should be able to track a disk on which a 1mm strip of black tape has been stuck - providing it is stuck on radially. But if a scratch is approximately tangential or circumferential, it can obscure the track below for enough time that the tracking or error correction cannot cope.

A complete guide:

http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/3100/2006/08/11/271@125577.htm

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz
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Good ol' disc wizard works for me :D for those times that i accidently bumped my xbox360 and circled my disc :P

But I got pads in my 360 now :D

Edited by undeadsoldier
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I have to agree with using any recovery software prior to physically polisihing the disc. This is of course, I hope for all of us, common sense. I'll have to check out digiprime's recommendation, as I constantly seem to save data on a few scratched DVD-RW's I have. Yes, I should thrwo them away, but it's just my nature to consistantly make the same bad errors in judgement. I don't learn the hard way, I learn the very, very, very hard way. :blink: The reason for recommendaing toothpaste was that it is something everyone, hopefully, has around the house. Wile brasso and other products may work better, I personally don't have these things lying around. If I'm going ot spend money on something to repair a disk, it may as well be something designed for hte task. I'm not knowcking the suggestions in any way, just giving my personal view on things. I still laugh at this thread every time I read it, not that it isn't hlepful, just that when I posted it I thought it would be removed for being in the wrong section. It was also one of my first poests, and seeing how people are constatntly being told to search for answers and warned about posts, I was unsure whether to even post this. I understand the warnings, I agree with them, I have rarely had to ask anything myself, as searching will eventually find 90% of whatever someone asks. It just amazes me how much input and how long this thread has added to. Guess you just never know what type of information really interests people.

enough of my bablbling, hopefully I'll get more involved with this site again. I think I wore myself out on tearing apart and rebuilding windows software.

Take care everyone

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If I'm going ot spend money on something to repair a disk, it may as well be something designed for hte task.

Well, it is your money, but a rapid google search would show you that a small (8 oz - 236 ml) can of Brasso can be bought for US$4.29 or a 150 ml one goes for GB£2.09

http://www.shop.com/op/~76523_8_OZ_BRASSO_...814?xit_recom=1

http://www.britsuperstore.com/acatalog/Brasso.html

(and it can usually be fond at the grocery around the corner)

A CD polishing paste, (first one I found):

http://www.gadgetsuk.com/Disc-repair-paste-p-17150.html

costs

Price: £6.95 (€ 9.73)

for a really tiny tube.

...and with Brasso you can also polish all your other metal or plastic hardware, or repair CD's for all your lifetime, that of your sons, of your nephews, and all other future descendants ....

jaclaz

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I'll second this one......

Or a comercial product that comes in 3 grades of coarseness.

http://www.modernplastics.com/novisplasticpolish.html

I bought this product, all three grades, at a Computer Show,

after I'd seen it demonstrated.

It not only polishes scratches out of CD's, but it did a nice job

of removing the road haze from my plastic headlight lenses on

my car. It works pretty well on scratched sunglasses B) too.

Good Luck,

Andromeda43 B)

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The only way your saliva would break down the cd is if the cd was made from bread. The enzymes in your saliva turn starch into sugar and that's about it.

I'm taking an anatomy class and we're at the digestive system atm :P

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old tip. been doin this for years. works 98% of the time. in my experience, the rougher the paste, the better.

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Well, haven't been here in forever, so I figured since this is one of my first posts, it would be fitting to add a new reply here. I have 2 new methods for repair (untested). First one is furniture polish, such as Pledge. The second is to use floor wax which is supposed to actually resurface (or fill in cracks) on the disk. Again I have not tried these, so it's at the users risk. good to be back, hopefully I won't drift away again for several months.

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There is also a "last resort" technique, really only useful to salvage data from a badly scratched CD, that will be thrown away afterwards.

The real problem with scratches is the "sides" of them that "confuse" the reader, by polishng as detailed above, you flatten the scratch, but sometimes the scratch is so deep that it is impossible to do that, so there is this other way, FILL the scratch with a transparent material.

Two candidates:

1) Car WAX

2) Car glass (windshield) silicon/teflon based spray coating

Of course you need to WAIT until the product has completely dried off, BEFORE polishing the CD with a cloth and insering it in the drive.

jaclaz

thnx man.... gr8 tip.....really saved a several cds i was gonna throw..... :thumbup

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