Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
glaurung

W98_Slip: genuine slipstreaming for windows 9x

54 posts in this topic

Yep. And I even have about a week left on a RapidShare premium account I bought when I wasn't patient enough to wait for somebody's huge file split into a bunch of 100MB parts. I could have just uploaded it.

Still, all's well since I don't think he needed all that stuff.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello ,

to use W98_slip , on my XP'computer ,I delete 2 lines:

if not exist %windir%\system32\extract.exe goto instructions

if not exist %windir%\system32\xcopy.exe goto instructions

and I copy extract.exe and xcopy.exe in the same folder as W98_slip.bat

and IT RUNs

PS: sorry for my english , ...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have there been any updates on this? Version .002? Or have any such projects ever actually completed?

--iWindoze

PS: I managed to slip the unoffcial SP for Win98SE using the method posted by reno7, but still saw some errors in the actual install, though they mostly seemed to revolve around the ISPs (like AOL and MSN, etc) and did not seem to cause any actual issues while installing except redundent error messages like the one about missing amsn.dll or some such.... Has anyone made any progress since?

Edited by iWindoze
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmm... i feel the need to bump this.

i really like the idea of a fairly updated 98; and although soporific (which i do feel gratitude for all your hard work) has come up with the Unattended Boot CD, i like throwing my stuff on cd... i also copy my win9x files on for se2me & revolution.... and there's not a whole lot of room left. i generally use sesp for simplicity's sake, & tack on some Maximum-Decim stuff. i've tried Auto-Patcher some & have the Unattended Boot CD (haven't used it yet).

i used to use bart's old isolinux multiboot (which doesn't work on xp) to give me the option of booting up with a home brewed presizer\savepart floppy image or 98 install image; yet defaulting to harddrive. created the iso... burned the disk... yeah... it was nice; but now outdated.

i also have an issue with redundancy, and keeping multiple versions of files where the old ones will almost surely NEVER be used (with programs that can be different).

i've dabbled with inf files some, and more or less stopped when i realized there was se2me & revolution. finding the cabs were linked and wouldn't work unlinked... bummer. i have info somewhere on what ones were linked and what each generally contained but i've let things collect i guess. need to sort.

i have no intention to take over, i just can't see this fade away so easily.

hopefully i will be able to talk with a like minded individual. maybe we can figure out somethin'.

i have seen several update packs, and like ideas i see, although i have to admit that it has been a while since i've tried some of the different update packs out there or tried to figure out their workings (life happens), so i readily admit ignorance.

i don't feel there will ever be a magical "coming together for the sake of 98" that would really benefit.

i'm not all knowing... or any other such nonsense. i just know some guys here have killer scripts; batches; infs; and whatnots. they all have their knowledge (and modesty :D). i've used some of it here and there in my own installations. (don't even ask; mine is far from good enough to share.)

but i believe i still have my resources of which there were a few different sources. perhaps i'll start organizing them so i can either add them to this post or bump as need be. at least throw some ideas on the table. i even had W98_Slip once... just didn't find the time to dabble with it. -jaymo

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree this project has great promise.

I am looking for a method to Slipstream gapes unofficial service pack + 98SE2ME + NUSB + LLXX's 137GB + patch

this might just be the tool for it.

makecab.exe can be found here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310618

I also found this information that might come in handy

Infinst.exe

What Infinst.Exe does:

It adds an inf file and the associated drivers to a Windows 98 setup share.

When Windows 98 is installed on other machines from the share, the added drivers will be

installed as if they were part of the original Windows 98 setup. These drivers may be for

any type of hardware or for additional network clients, protocols or services.

To automatically install network clients, protocols or services you will need to add them

to your msbatch.inf. This can be done using Microsoft Batch 98.

How to use Infinst:

Note: the tool requires a Windows 98 setup share with write permissions.

It will not add files to a CD-ROM.

1. Start the tool by double clicking it.

2. Enter the path and filename of the inf you wish to add to Windows 98 setup.

3. Enter the path and filename for Setup.exe on the Windows 98 setup share you wish

to add the inf to.

4. Click Add Inf.

Infinst does the following when adding an inf:

* It copies the inf and the driver files needed (listed in the CopyFiles= sections of

the inf) to the Windows 98 setup share. If a catalog (.cat) file or

layout (.inf) file is specified in the inf, Infinst also adds it.

* It adds the appropriate entries to the following files: all previous inf files with

matching PnP IDs, the Custom.inf, and the Infinst.log. The files are changed as

outlined below.

Note: Infinst copies all files listed in the inf's CopyFiles= section to

the setup share; however Infinst does not automatically process any infs listed in

the CopyFiles= section. These infs may need to be added manually for setup to

complete successfully.

How Infinst.Exe works:

1. It creates two directories in the Windows 98 setup share. One (Oldinf) is for infs

that are replaced by new infs of the same name, and one (Wininf) is for storing

the infs included with Windows 98.

2. It checks the versioning of the infs to be added (only infs with version $CHICAGO$

should be added, although Infinst.Exe will correct certain versions to $CHICAGO$

automatically).

3. It searches the inf to be added for its PnP IDs (Plug and Play IDs).

4. It compares the found PnP IDs of the new inf with the PnP IDs contained in all the

infs that are in the Wininf directory.

5. If an inf with a matching PnP ID is found, Infinst.Exe copies it to the directory

containing the Windows 98 setup files, as long as there is not an inf file of the

same name there already.

6. It compares the found PnP IDs of the new inf with the PnP IDs contained in all the

infs that are contained in the Windows 98 setup share.

7. If an inf with a matching PnP ID is found, the matching PnP IDs are commented out.

8. It copies the new inf and all necessary driver files to the directory where the

Windows 98 setup files reside.

9. It edits the Custom.inf file. Note: Infs and drivers of install media classes

(such as net) are added to more sections of the Custom.inf than those of other

classes, because they may be needed earlier in setup.

10. It appends to the Infinst.log.

Infinst.Exe can add infs for single or multiple PnP device(s), whether or not they are

supported by Windows 98. Drivers added by Infinst.Exe should install properly whether

Windows 98 is setup locally or across a network, regardless of whether it is a clean

install or an upgrade. In other words, you can install all the infs you want and run

setup any way you want.

Design Limitations:

1. Adding an inf with the same name as one included with Windows 98 or one previously

added will eliminate all functionality of the previous inf, regardless of PnP IDs.

2. You must have write permission to the location of the Windows 98 setup files for

Infinst.Exe to work. (I.E. it will not work on a CD-ROM).

3. Adding an inf containing the same PnP IDs as an inf already included in the setup

share will result in eliminating those PnP IDs from the already included inf.

Trouble Shooting:

1. When adding an inf to a Novell server, Maximum File Locks per Connection must be

greater than 600 or infinst will be unable to add the inf correctly.

2. All infs and drivers being added must not be marked as read only.

Edited by galahs
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am on the quest to build a slipstreamed version of the best Windows 98 Second Edition I possibly can.

I am thinking of one that has all the official MS hotfixes, all critical Unofficial hotfixes, + compatible WinMe files + adding Native USB support + copy2GB patch + 48bit LBA for larger disk drives over 137GB

Being an industrial designer, I love to make things simpler and easier to use. I find having to apply a series of updates to get Win98SE back in shape after a reinstall frustrating to say the least.

I know there are other unattended installations around (but they all add 3rd party apps) but I want one that just installs the most up-to-date Win9x Operating System possible. Nothing more, nothing less. No IE6, DX9 or WMP9. These should be left to the user to decide on.

Now my problem is I need to work out how to slipstream additional files not originally included in Win98 CD (ie. adding new files, not replacing existing ones). Do you know how this would be possible?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How can I modify this for slipstreaming files into Windows ME since I need to because of my Win2k8 Project at WPC?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Now my problem is I need to work out how to slipstream additional files not originally included in Win98 CD (ie. adding new files, not replacing existing ones). Do you know how this would be possible?

(I answered your PM, but figured I should reply on the forum as well)

I haven't had time to do any further work on the w98_slip project for quite a while.

Adding extra files is complicated because the install process depends on the file being referenced in at least three different places: layout*.inf, copy*.inf, and the individual inf file that actually covers the components you're adding. Plus, of course, you have to include any necessary registry keys (especially instructions for self-registering files) for the new files.

Layout* and copy* appear to need to be parallel (so a file referenced in layout1 needs to appear in copy1, it can't be in copy2 or the initial file copy phase of setup will fail).

You could in theory avoid the requirement that the new files appear in both layout* and copy* by forcing the file copy process to happen after setup reboots (using a runonce command), and creating your own additional layout file that points to a cab where all the new files are stored. But making everything go through runonce adds a layer of complexity.

Alternately, you could use custom.inf. There is basically no documentation on this online that I can find, but if a file named "custom.inf" appears in the setup directory, setup will perform any file copy commands contained in it automatically, expecting to find the files whereever custom.inf tells it to look. (Custom.inf was originally intended for OEMs to allow them to automatically install drivers and driver infs). So just put the new files in a new cabinet, create a custom.inf that grabs those files and puts them where they belong. I'm not sure if custom.inf supports adding registry entries, I'd suspect it doesn't. You can find a model custom.inf in the intel motherboard drivers for win9x; the main wrinkle to using it is that for at least some files (including disk driver files and all infs, IIRC), you have to specify them being copied twice, once to setup's temp directory where precopy is expanded to (there's a special section for that in Custom.inf), and again to where they are supposed to ultimately go.

Either way, my thinking on this, before I set it aside, was to create a few new files in the setup directory: a newstuff.cab (containing all the binaries we're adding), newfiles.inf (layout file), and newstuff.inf (containing either just the registry information, or registry information and file copy directives), plus custom.inf if I decided to use that. Doing it that way rather than trying to shoehorn things into the existing layout* and copy* system would, I thought, be more flexible and also easier to script automatically, since we'd be building the inf files from scratch rather than trying to amend existing ones.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How can I modify this for slipstreaming files into Windows ME since I need to because of my Win2k8 Project at WPC?

First, Considering that W98_slip has lain fallow on my hard drive for over a year now, I doubt I will ever have the time or inclination to adapt it for an OS I don't own. That said, since I don't own ME, I have no idea of what problems would arise from trying to apply this slipstreaming method to it. If ME's setup files are digitally signed, for instance, then you're probably SOL.

THe place to start in adapting w98_slip to work with ME would be to look at my first follow up to the original post in this thread, in which I described some of the ins and outs of SE's cab files. Read up on Cabinet files and makecab (the Cabinet SDK documentation isn't the best but it's still the place to start) so what I said in that post makes sense, and then experiment with ME's setup files and see if they behave the same way as SE's file do or not. The size of the cabs doesn't matter so much as whether they are linked in a chain or not. If ME's cabs are not linked in a chain the way SE's are, then you'll have to do significant extra modifications to make W98_slip work for WinME.

Assuming that the ME cab files are chained together, then making it work with ME shouldn't be too terribly hard; the main thing you'll have to do is modify the scripts that generate the makecab directive file so that they create cabs that break at the breakpoints you find in ME rather than the breakpoints found in SE.

The hard part, of course, is finding all the little quirks that need to be addressed. For instance, a short file name in SE contains a parenthesis, IIRC, which is a character that Minitrue treats as special; the entry for that file in the file list had to be specially handled to take out the parenthesis before I could use Minitrue to process the entire file list. ME may or may not have similarly named files, but you can be quite sure it has something quirky.

W98_slip is not nearly as hard to hack as, say, HFslip; as batch files go, it's pretty basic, and the hardest part for me was learning to use Minitrue to do the donkey work of manipulating file lists into makecab directive files and layout*.inf files. That will be the hard part for you, too -- fortunately, minitrue's documentation is fairly complete and well-written, and you'll have my original minitrue scripts to crib from.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed with Gapes Unofficial Service pack, he claims tou can semi slipstream some updates by simply putting them in the Win98 setup folder.

Does that mean Windows 98 has a built in support for slipstreaming newer versions of existing files?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also note that you can create a bootable cd of 98lite

Maybe it would give some hints as to how we could make a slipstreamed win98SE. IF 98lite unpacks all the files, then installs windows, it might be possible to replace the existing files with newer versions, this would basically be a slipstreamed version of Windows.

There is a trick to do that, but you can only choose one version (micro, sleek, chubby etc.), as all the win98 files will be changed to install only one of the 98lite enterprise license version

First boot from floppy disc (assuming you have the latest 98lite on floppy):

* at the A:> dos prompt type "98pro47" this will start the installer up..

* select "install"

* type in your key code to allow the installer to decompress

* use the default path for the files if you want, namely "c:98setup"

..at this point the installer should decompress and dump a few files onto the clean hard disk in the c:98setup folder.

* at the A:> dos prompt type "C:" to change to the C:> dos prompt.

* at the C:> dos prompt type "cd 98setup" to change to the 98setup folder. The dos prompt should now be C:98setup>

* at the C:98SETUP dos prompt type "98lite /cd" [You can pass a switch command to the installation, for older hardware ie: /NM switch - this is passed to the windows setup and means "no minimum", or /NG switch also (no VGA graphics in 98lite) just to lower the burden on the system. or any other switch ] to start 98lite - it should fire up and show you a couple of screens of disclaimers etc and then stop with a menu of options with the first option being "1. Clean Install"

* press the "1" key to choose the clean install

* 98lite will then ask you to insert your win98 CDROM and it will copy all of the windows setup files from the CDROM to the c:98setup folder

* 98lite will then ask if you want to copy the win95 explorer files to the hard disk in case you want to use the MICRO or SLEEK desktop option. This is an optional step - but if you insert your 95 CDROM or tell the installer where the files are (e.g. you may have them on a floppy or another hard disk) the files will also be copied to the C:98setup folder

... at this point you should now have a C:98setup folder that contains:

1. the 98lite program files

2. the win98 installation files, and optionally,

3. the win95 files (explorer.exe v4.00.950, Shell32.dll v4.00.1111 and Comdlg32.dll v4.00.951)

... 98lite is now ready to install windows for you and it will start the process itself - you can also stop here if you want, and make it a bootable CD.

* if you have the original bootable CD for windows 98, use Winiso or other program to make an ISO file, and edit the ISO image, then rename the folder in C: drive from "98setup" to "win98" and replace it into the ISO image (delete the original win98 folder in ISO image). burn the image to Disc.

That's all!

now you have a bootable CD with your 98lite installation.

I have also been looking around for EXE and INF tools (because I sure don't want to learn too much coding)

I found that Windows 2000 and XP have an EXE maker built into them called Iexpress.

There is an older version available here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/237803

A guide to using Iexpress can be found here: http://babek.info/libertybasicfiles/lbnews...34/iexpress.htm

For creating your own INF 's I found this handy freeware tool. INF-Tool --- http://www.inner-smile.com/dl_inf.htm

Some good information on INF files can be found here: http://www.ryston.com/x/INF_web/main.htm

More info here: http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms790220.aspx

And here is a good guide to making Batch files (.bat)

http://home.att.net/~gobruen/progs/dos_batch/dos_batch.html

The only decent Batch Creation utility I have found is Shareware (15 uses) called Easy Batch Creator --- http://www.octosoft.co.uk/ebb/

Hope this is helpful.

Edited by galahs
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I noticed with Gapes Unofficial Service pack, he claims tou can semi slipstream some updates by simply putting them in the Win98 setup folder.

Does that mean Windows 98 has a built in support for slipstreaming newer versions of existing files?

Yes; there's no need to use w98_slip unless you want to have a neat and clean looking setup folder... which some people enjoy having. (also if your setup cd is jammed with extras, integrating updated files into the cabs takes less room).

If you just put the updated versions of the files into the setup folder, setup will preferentially grab files from the folder before rooting around in the cabs for the same file. This behaviour is the basis for how 98lite does its magic; it modifies existing *.inf files and drops them in the setup folder.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I also note that you can create a bootable cd of 98lite

Maybe it would give some hints as to how we could make a slipstreamed win98SE. IF 98lite unpacks all the files, then installs windows, it might be possible to replace the existing files with newer versions, this would basically be a slipstreamed version of Windows.

98lite only unpacks some of the inf files (about a dozen or so), which it then modifies to make certain components removable. You can do much the same thing yourself if you've learned how to hack inf files. Removing some unwanted components is childishly simple (comment the relevant files out of setuppp.inf), while removing others takes a lot of work (eg, de-integrating internet explorer).

Because 98lite is payware, it puts code in the updated infs that causes them to be automatically deleted once setup has completed. "98lite /cd" just tells it to not automatically launch setup once it creates the modified .inf files, which means the modified files remain on disk for hacking, integrating into the precopy*.cabs with w98_slip, burning to cd, or whatever.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.